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The suicide wave that followed the United States stock

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The suicide wave that followed the United States stock [#permalink] New post 26 Jan 2010, 09:06
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

56% (02:15) correct 44% (02:15) wrong based on 55 sessions
14. The “suicide wave” that followed the United States stock market crash of October 1929 is more legend than fact. Careful examination of the monthly figures on the causes of death in 1929 shows that the number of suicides in October and in November was comparatively low. In only three other months were the monthly figures lower. During the summer months, when the stock market was flourishing, the number of suicides was substantially higher.
Which one of the following, if true, would best challenge the conclusion of the passage?
(A) The suicide rate is influenced by many psychological, interpersonal, and societal factors during any given historical period.
(B) October and November have almost always had relatively high suicide rates, even during the 1920s and 1930s.
(C) The suicide rate in October and November of 1929 was considerably higher than the average for those months during several preceding and following years.
(D) During the years surrounding the stock market crash, suicide rates were typically lower at the beginning of any calendar year than toward the end of that year.
(E) Because of seasonal differences, the number of suicides in October and November of 1929 would not be expected to be the same as those for other months.


OA is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
c
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Re: Lsat Test II [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2010, 15:02
vaivish1723 wrote:
14. The “suicide wave” that followed the United States stock market crash of October 1929 is more legend than fact. Careful examination of the monthly figures on the causes of death in 1929 shows that the number of suicides in October and in November was comparatively low. In only three other months were the monthly figures lower. During the summer months, when the stock market was flourishing, the number of suicides was substantially higher.
Which one of the following, if true, would best challenge the conclusion of the passage?

(A) The suicide rate is influenced by many psychological, interpersonal, and societal factors during any given historical period.

Not helpful for contradicting the argument. This neither supports nor hurts the conclusion of the passage. Whatever the cause of the suicide rate in Oct/Nov 1929, the researchers are arguing it was something else, perhaps some other psychological, interpersonal or societal factors. Someone contradicting the researchers, however, would need to use the same logic since the suicide rate is lower than you'd expect if the legendary relationship existed. There may be other psychological, interpersonal and societal factors at play, in addition to the stock market crash, that made it somewhat lower in absolute terms.

(B) October and November have almost always had relatively high suicide rates, even during the 1920s and 1930s.

This would at best have no effect on the argument and at worst help the researchers. If the suicide rates in historically deadly months are very low in 1929, you'd have to assume that something about that year caused people to want to live more than in other years. It'd be seemingly impossible to tie that back to the stock market crash without additional info.

(C) The suicide rate in October and November of 1929 was considerably higher than the average for those months during several preceding and following years.

This seems like the right one. Even if the suicide rate was low in absolute terms it could still be high compared to other Oct/Nov close to 1929. In that case, it would be easy to argue that something specific to 1929 caused it to spike and that thing could be the stock market crash.

(D) During the years surrounding the stock market crash, suicide rates were typically lower at the beginning of any calendar year than toward the end of that year.

Just like B, this would have no effect or help the researchers. If the rate should be higher than other months but actually ended up lower, it would be hard to argue that the stock market crash caused more suicides and a higher rate.

(E) Because of seasonal differences, the number of suicides in October and November of 1929 would not be expected to be the same as those for other months.

This is very close and could be the most difficult answer to set aside. Obviously this is what the opposition would use as a premise to answer C. Baked into the argument that Oct/Nov 1929 was relatively high for other Oct/Novs could be the assumption stated in E: seasonal differences would make the "baseline" or "expected suicide rate" lower than the overall suicide rate. However, E is made a much weaker choice because it lacks a direction. Due to the ambiguity, the suicide rate in Oct/Nov could be higher because of seasonal differences

OA is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
c



This is a pretty good CR and I agree that the answer should be C.
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Re: Lsat Test II [#permalink] New post 05 Feb 2010, 01:24
Conclusion: suicide wave was not caused by the stock market's meltdown

Statement 1: The crash happened in Oct 1929.
Statement 2: Suicide rates in Nov and in Oct was comparatively low
Statement 3: some months later, the number of suicides grew, as well as the value of the stocks

Assumption made: suicide is instantaneously related to the stock's values


IMO is C, because it goes against the statement that nov and oct had low suicide rates.
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Re: Lsat Test II [#permalink] New post 24 Apr 2010, 03:53
Difficult one. Took 3 min to resolve it.
We need to find the choice which weakens/chellenges the conclusion. Conclusion is:
The “suicide wave” that followed the United States stock market crash of October 1929 is more legend than fact.

We have to prove that this was not the case. If you take a close look then you will find we are mentioned about the the number of suicides while the choices mentioned have the suicides rate. This could be a trap. Beware!!!
Only C clearly proves the weaking.


vaivish1723 wrote:
14. The “suicide wave” that followed the United States stock market crash of October 1929 is more legend than fact. Careful examination of the monthly figures on the causes of death in 1929 shows that the number of suicides in October and in November was comparatively low. In only three other months were the monthly figures lower. During the summer months, when the stock market was flourishing, the number of suicides was substantially higher.
Which one of the following, if true, would best challenge the conclusion of the passage?
(A) The suicide rate is influenced by many psychological, interpersonal, and societal factors during any given historical period.
(B) October and November have almost always had relatively high suicide rates, even during the 1920s and 1930s.
(C) The suicide rate in October and November of 1929 was considerably higher than the average for those months during several preceding and following years.
(D) During the years surrounding the stock market crash, suicide rates were typically lower at the beginning of any calendar year than toward the end of that year.
(E) Because of seasonal differences, the number of suicides in October and November of 1929 would not be expected to be the same as those for other months.


OA is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
c

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Re: Lsat Test II [#permalink] New post 24 Apr 2010, 10:00
good one . thanks for sharing.
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Re: Lsat Test II [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2011, 11:25
The answer is C.

Conclusion of passage: Suicides in October and November are more legend than fact and not related to the stock market crash.

C shows this is not the case.
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Re: Lsat Test II [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2011, 02:16
+1 for C
Re: Lsat Test II   [#permalink] 07 Aug 2011, 02:16
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