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The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly,

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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 08:33
"but it usually gets the full attention of a country's leaders" -------> can only modify coup.

Replace it with "the coup" in the original sentence and you can see whether it points to coup.

The typical military coup blah blah, but the coup usually gets the full attention of a country's leaders, and eventually, blah blah, the ideology behind blah blah

Hussain15 wrote:
What is "It" referring to in option "C"?? How can we say with surity that "it" is referring to coup??

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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 09:01
I think you are mixing independent clauses with main clause. You can connect independent clauses with conjunctions.
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 09:06
ykaiim wrote:
I think you are mixing independent clauses with main clause. You can connect independent clauses with conjunctions.



Hi ykaiim,

As from what I know, a main clause and an independent clause are synonymous terms!

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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2010, 04:11
izaidi wrote:
ykaiim wrote:
I think you are mixing independent clauses with main clause. You can connect independent clauses with conjunctions.



Hi ykaiim,

As from what I know, a main clause and an independent clause are synonymous terms!

Thanks



Hi Guys,

These are important terms to clarify, so it's good that you're having this discussion!

A clause is simply a subject and verb, but there are 4 kinds:

1) Independent
2) Dependent
3) Main
4) Relative (a.k.a. Subordinate)

Ex. I eat when I am hungry.
Independent: I eat (This clause can be a sentence on its own.)
Dependent: when I am hungry (Because of the "when", this clause cannot be a sentence on its own.)

Ex. Frogs that live in trees eat flies.
Main: Frogs eat flies (The main clause is the clause on the outside.)
Relative: that (referring to frogs) live in trees (This clause starts with a relative pronoun and is the clause on the inside.)

So while a main clause (outside) is always independent, an independent clause is not necessarily a main clause. When we talk about main clauses we are referring to outside (versus inside) clauses.

Let me know if this is at all confusing...

Best,
Sarai
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2010, 22:21
Thanks for the help Sarai. But MGMAT SC Guide says that main/independent are the same. and subordinate/dependent are the same.

But otherwise i'm good. I was really looking for clarifications on how many you can string together, and you helped me with that. Thanks
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2010, 23:19
izaidi wrote:
Thanks for the help Sarai. But MGMAT SC Guide says that main/independent are the same. and subordinate/dependent are the same.

But otherwise i'm good. I was really looking for clarifications on how many you can string together, and you helped me with that. Thanks


Hi izaidi,

I'm glad the post helped. Regarding the terminology, while I haven't seen MGMAT's wording, it is important for students to diffentiate between relative clauses and dependent clauses because they have such different functions. Since relative clauses begin with relative pronouns, they refer to a specific word in the sentence, making the position of this clause in the sentence matter. Where they are placed in the sentence in many cases determines whether a sentence is correct. Relative clauses are also important to parallelism, as two relative clauses must start with the same relative pronoun to be parallel. Dependent clauses, on the other hand, are not relative to any word; they simply come before or after an independent clause.

Anyways, this really doesn't affect you in any way, so you can ignore this digression ;)

Best of luck! :)

Best,
Sarai
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2010, 11:20
Hi Sarai
I have a question on the usage of "and"
See this SC and tell me if its ok for "and" to appear twice in the list of things. I believe "and" can come only before the last item in the list.

The labor agreement permits staff reductions through attrition with increased pension benefits and a special early-retirement program for speeding it up.
(A) attrition with increased pension benefits and a special early-retirement program for speeding it up
(B) attrition and provides increased pension benefits and a special early-retirement program to speed the attrition process
(C) attrition, which will be speeded up by providing increased pension benefits and a special early-retirement program
(D) attrition, which, by their providing increased pension benefits and a special early-retirement program, will speed the process
(E) attrition, which provides increased pension benefits and a special early-retirement program for speeding the attrition process

Or this is like -
permits x and provides (y and z) ---> Second "and" is combining the subitems y and z and NOT with x. In that case the second "and" is valid.

Please comment.

SaraiGMAXonline wrote:
Hi izaidi,

Technically no-- but you wouldn't string too many clauses together with "and".

Ex. Correct: I eat steak, and my brother eats fish, but our parents are vegetarians. (3 independent clauses)

Incorrect: I eat steak, and my brother eats fish, and my parents are vegetarians.

Let me know if this is still confusing.

Best,
Sarai

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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2010, 00:58
Are you guys talking about the Powerscore verbal bible? What's GMAT HACKS?

ykaiim wrote:
Hi,

I think this source is valid. I find the level of questions fair enough to polish your grammar. Gmat Hacks doesnt give huge questions bank but many of the given questions are good, worth a try.

serhio wrote:
hey I found where you got this one from.
Verbal bible.
and th answer is not Е :( because it is not parralell.

Could anyone tell me whether this source is representative of the real GMAT? I mean does anyone have positive experience using this source?
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 17 Jul 2010, 03:23
Hi there-- sorry for the delay. This is a good question for all to see, so I'm putting it in a new post!
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 06 Nov 2010, 09:14
Entering pretty late on this one, but one thing to clarify, for anyone who references this in future.

The first part of the sentence, an Independent clause, is:

The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly , amassing little support, collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power.

Remember that Independent clauses can stand on their own, in the sense that they are complete sentences in themselves. But, is the following a complete sentence?

The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly, amassing little support, collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power.

Draw parallels with the following sentence:

The teacher arrived early in the classroom, surprising students, alerting the monitor.

Clearly the above is not a complete sentence. The correct construction would have been:

The teacher arrived early in the classroom, surprising students and alerting the monitor.

Similarly, in the question under consideration, the correct first Independent clause would be:

The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly, amassing little support AND collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power.

Since and is missing in the original sentence, it is wrong. B has the same issue.
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 06 Nov 2010, 09:26
Yup go with C for parallelism.

1. ... typical military coup FAILS (plus the amassing and collapsing - subsidiary clauses)

2. ... but it usually GETS the full attention... (as in C; only such answer choice).
Re: The typical military coup   [#permalink] 06 Nov 2010, 09:26
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