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The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly,

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The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly, [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 06:11
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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  5% (low)

Question Stats:

28% (03:08) correct 71% (01:34) wrong based on 21 sessions
The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly, amassing little support, collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but, having usually gotten the full attention of a country's leaders, eventually, once an initial retaliation period ends, the ideology behind the coup makes subtle inroads in the nation's government.

(A) support, collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but, having usually gotten the full attention of a country's leaders,

(B) support, collapses within hours of its first public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders gotten,

(C) support and collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but it usually gets the full attention of a country's leaders, and

(D) support and collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders, and

(E) support, collapses within hours of its first making a public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders, and


Though I marked the correct OA, I want to confirm my reasoning. So, please comment.
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 10:31
hi,
where did you find this one? :)
I believe it is Е

I`ll post my explanations later
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 10:37
I think these are parallel : fails, collapses, makes.

hence, E.

Pls. correct, if i'm wrong ! :)
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 11:21
hey I found where you got this one from.
Verbal bible.
and th answer is not Е :( because it is not parralell.

Could anyone tell me whether this source is representative of the real GMAT? I mean does anyone have positive experience using this source?
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 16:10
I would choose C.

1. amassing and collapsing are in parallel.
2. use of "but" and "and" to connect phrases - to avoid run-on.
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 19:44
IMO C.
amassing and collapsing are in parallel. Also i feel "it usually gets the full attention " makes a more clear meaning than the other options
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 20:02
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IMO C, for parallelism

amassing and collapsing - should be parallel, they occur almost at the same time

(fails... ) ...but it usually gets the full attention of a country's leaders, and ...ends... makes... - parallel , shows the sequence of actions aptly
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 31 May 2010, 21:17
Hi,

I think this source is valid. I find the level of questions fair enough to polish your grammar. Gmat Hacks doesnt give huge questions bank but many of the given questions are good, worth a try.

serhio wrote:
hey I found where you got this one from.
Verbal bible.
and th answer is not Е :( because it is not parralell.

Could anyone tell me whether this source is representative of the real GMAT? I mean does anyone have positive experience using this source?

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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 01 Jun 2010, 02:34
thanks - I will definetely go through this book
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 07 Jun 2010, 06:31
phew....it took so much time to decide on one option

I think it is C....what is the OA?

The military coup fails bloodlessly, amassing little support and collpasing within hours of its first public claim to power, but it gets.....and .......makes inroads to government.

The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly, amassing little support, collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but, having usually gotten the full attention of a country's leaders, eventually, once an initial retaliation period ends, the ideology behind the coup makes subtle inroads in the nation's government.

(C) support and collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but it usually gets the full attention of a country's leaders, and

(D) support and collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders, and - not parallel

(E) support, collapses within hours of its first making a public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders, and
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 07 Jun 2010, 09:20
OA is C.
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 07 Jun 2010, 20:13
nice question ! I chose C too; however I was a bit hesitant because this sentence has two main clauses and one subordinate clause.

How many main and subordinate clauses can you join in one sentence (provided that you are using proper punctuation and conjunctions)?.

Actually I just made a new post for this question: how-many-main-and-subordinate-clauses-can-you-join-95465.html
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 02:26
Good ques....I choose the correct ans :-D :-D
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 04:40
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ykaiim wrote:
The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly, amassing little support, collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but, having usually gotten the full attention of a country's leaders, eventually, once an initial retaliation period ends, the ideology behind the coup makes subtle inroads in the nation's government.

(A) support, collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but, having usually gotten the full attention of a country's leaders,

(B) support, collapses within hours of its first public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders gotten,

(C) support and collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but it usually gets the full attention of a country's leaders, and

(D) support and collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders, and

(E) support, collapses within hours of its first making a public claim to power, but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders, and


Though I marked the correct OA, I want to confirm my reasoning. So, please comment.


Let's look at clause structure here:
The original contains 2 independent clauses (each could be its own sentence):
1)The coup fails
2)once an initial retaliation period ends [dependent clause], the ideology makes subtle inroads [independent clause]

But there is no word joining the two independent clauses; there is only a comma!! On the GMAT SC you cannot join 2 independent clauses with just a comma:

Ex. Incorrect: I am hungry, I will eat.
Correct: I am hungry; I will eat. OR... I am hungry, and I will eat.
So A and B are out.

Notice that in D and E, "but with the usual full attention of a country's leaders" is a prepositional phrase-- a modifier-- that is not attached to anything it can logically describe.

Finally, C give the correct intended contrast: The coup fails... but it gets attention...



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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 06:42
What is "It" referring to in option "C"?? How can we say with surity that "it" is referring to coup??
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 06:55
izaidi wrote:
nice question ! I chose C too; however I was a bit hesitant because this sentence has two main clauses and one subordinate clause.

How many main and subordinate clauses can you join in one sentence (provided that you are using proper punctuation and conjunctions)?.

Actually I just made a new post for this question: how-many-main-and-subordinate-clauses-can-you-join-95465.html



SaraiGMAXonline could you answer this, Is there any limit to the number of clauses in a sentence?
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 07:29
IMO there can be just one main clause.

izaidi wrote:
nice question ! I chose C too; however I was a bit hesitant because this sentence has two main clauses and one subordinate clause.

How many main and subordinate clauses can you join in one sentence (provided that you are using proper punctuation and conjunctions)?.

Actually I just made a new post for this question: how-many-main-and-subordinate-clauses-can-you-join-95465.html

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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 07:39
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izaidi wrote:
izaidi wrote:
nice question ! I chose C too; however I was a bit hesitant because this sentence has two main clauses and one subordinate clause.

How many main and subordinate clauses can you join in one sentence (provided that you are using proper punctuation and conjunctions)?.

Actually I just made a new post for this question: how-many-main-and-subordinate-clauses-can-you-join-95465.html



SaraiGMAXonline could you answer this, Is there any limit to the number of clauses in a sentence?


Hi izaidi,

Technically no-- but you wouldn't string too many clauses together with "and".

Ex. Correct: I eat steak, and my brother eats fish, but our parents are vegetarians. (3 independent clauses)

Incorrect: I eat steak, and my brother eats fish, and my parents are vegetarians.

Let me know if this is still confusing.

Best,
Sarai

If this helped, kindly give Kudos! :wink:
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 07:54
ykaiim wrote:
IMO there can be just one main clause.

izaidi wrote:
nice question ! I chose C too; however I was a bit hesitant because this sentence has two main clauses and one subordinate clause.

How many main and subordinate clauses can you join in one sentence (provided that you are using proper punctuation and conjunctions)?.

Actually I just made a new post for this question: how-many-main-and-subordinate-clauses-can-you-join-95465.html


No you can definitely join more than one main clause in one sentence with proper punctuation and co-ordinating conjunctions. My question regards whether there is a limit.

Join 2 Main Clauses = Comma + Co-ordinating conjunction (And Or For Nor But Yet So)

In this sentence there are three main clauses (not sure why I saw 2 main and 1 sub before). Each clause here could stand as its own sentence.

The typical military coup fails relatively bloodlessly, amassing little support and collapsing within hours of its first public claim to power, but it usually gets the full attention of a country's leaders, and, eventually, once an initial retaliation period ends, the ideology behind the coup makes subtle inroads in the nation's government.
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Re: The typical military coup [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2010, 08:11
SaraiGMAXonline wrote:

Hi izaidi,

Technically no-- but you wouldn't string too many clauses together with "and".

Ex. Correct: I eat steak, and my brother eats fish, but our parents are vegetarians. (3 independent clauses)

Incorrect: I eat steak, and my brother eats fish, and my parents are vegetarians.

Let me know if this is still confusing.

Best,
Sarai

If this helped, kindly give Kudos! :wink:



Thank You Sarai -- I appreciate your response.

Your answer is technically no, which is what I thought.

Could we classify this is as a style issue? Stringing to many "AND"s together just doesn't sound good?

Is it fair to say, that I probably won't ever see more than 3 main clauses in a correct GMAT Answer?

If you have more examples too then that would be great.

Thanks
Re: The typical military coup   [#permalink] 08 Jun 2010, 08:11
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