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The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Ame -Old Thread

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The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Ame -Old Thread [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2004, 12:24
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A
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C
D
E

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The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2008, 11:55
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2008, 13:31
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Its down to C and D. I dont know which one makes the census weaker; comparing the number, or the percentage ....
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2008, 20:00
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Id go for D. Its more accurate than C.
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2008, 23:13
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2008, 23:22
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JCLEONES wrote:
The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?
(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.


I have a doubt between C and D...C is better because we care for people uncounted and D refers only to the total number of homeless and rich...is OA C?
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2008, 23:48
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i think it is C.
1. because the author talks about statistical portrait being accurate. So i guess it must be talking about the relative figures of number rich and poor.
2. D does not talk about people who are uncounted. It only talks about rich and poor. C does so.
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 29 Jan 2008, 17:58
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I would go for D.
C is wrong because it talks about percentage of poor Americans uncounted and the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
It does not say how many poor/rich there are in America.

OA please?
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Re: CR Us Census Tb19 [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2008, 12:11
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I shoot for B.

For this kind of questions, the answer must be stated in the argument. There is no way mentioning any numbers, or percentages, therefore C and D is out. The primary purpose of the census is NOT to analyze the economic status of the American population, therefore E is out, and "Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census" there are no reasons mentioned, thereofre the best answer remains B. It's not the best and the most clear answer, but it is supported by the passage.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2004, 13:00
I think the underlying assumption is that both rich and poor not being counted are equally impacted. I will go for C where equal % of rich and poor are impacted (proportionally equal impact). D is close but "equal in number" is a bit too much to assume.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2004, 15:51
Go with Patrick.

Thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2004, 22:25
OA is C...... nice explanation :-D

thanks guys
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2004, 16:35
Shouldn't this be 'B'
Becos 'C' is misleading.
Suppose, there are 10% of rich & poor americans go uncounted - the actual numbers could be different.
For example, if there are 100 rich americans and 1000 poor americans - the numbers will be 10 & 100 respectively which means the statistics painted by the census bureau will be inaccurate -if this is assumed then we will have to make another assumption - the number of rich & poor americans is the same
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 [#permalink] New post 31 Dec 2004, 09:42
rthothad,

It will be "c" as:
Missing poor Americans Missing rich Americans
--------------------------- = -------------------------
Total Americans Total Americans
+++++

& Not

Missing Poor Americans Missing Rich Americans
--------------------------- = --------------------------
Total Poor Americans Total Rich Americans
+++


Tx.

Anna
rthothad wrote:
Shouldn't this be 'B'
Becos 'C' is misleading.
Suppose, there are 10% of rich & poor americans go uncounted - the actual numbers could be different.
For example, if there are 100 rich americans and 1000 poor americans - the numbers will be 10 & 100 respectively which means the statistics painted by the census bureau will be inaccurate -if this is assumed then we will have to make another assumption - the number of rich & poor americans is the same

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 [#permalink] New post 31 Dec 2004, 20:56
Anna Rama, In order for 'C' to be assumed 'B' needs to be assumed in the first place only then can you assume 'C'.
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The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2005, 19:36
The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2005, 20:43
(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
- out of scope

(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.

(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
- out.

(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
-out

(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.
-out of scope

I'll go with (B). The passage suggests that only Americans can be classified into two types: Rich or Poor.
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Re: CR - US Census [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2005, 22:26
Antmavel wrote:
The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.


I think this question is weird.

The conclusion is that the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate.

But author just said that some of the poor are not counted and some of the rich are also not counted.

How could we prove the conclusion is true.

We must assume that the number of the poor uncounted is the same as the number of the rich uncounted.

However, we cannot find the answer choice.

(B) is unclear. Even if we can specify who is poor or rich. How could we prove that although thousands of Americans probably go uncounted, the census is still accurate.

I would pick C.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2005, 06:02
To be honest with you, I thought everybody was going to answer B but I got a C from chunjuwu :idea:

Actually OA is C, I am reading now chunjuwu's post because in my mind it was a mistake in the OA, it seemed so obvious that it was B...

However maybe chunjuwu's post will change my opinion about that CR
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2005, 06:10
I kinda disagree that it's (C). The source of the question will determine though because some questions sets aren't that reliable as far as answers go.
  [#permalink] 24 Mar 2005, 06:10
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