Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 29 Aug 2014, 06:15

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Eternal Intern
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jun 2003
Posts: 480
Location: Lone Star State
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2003, 06:33
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

67% (00:00) correct 33% (00:00) wrong based on 7 sessions
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter ( in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable) astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.

A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable
B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable
C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable
D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully
E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable

I always don't understand this point of grammar. Gravity waves do not interact with matter like electromagnetic waves. Clarify on what this means, I think it means it does not interact with matter that is like electromagnetic waves.

Gravity waves do not interact with matter like electromagnetic waves do interact with matter.

Do you cut out the "interact with matter" part to make it more readable. Is that what people do who speak English?

You have to understand stuffed bears are foreigners like someone from Russia or India. :lol: :lol:
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 18 Jun 2003
Posts: 142
Location: Hockeytown
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [1] , given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2003, 21:34
1
This post received
KUDOS
(B) is right. Technically, the word "hopefully" is an adverb form of the word "hopeful," which is used to describe one's state of mind about a particular thing.

For example:

JP is hopeful that he will get a good score on the GMAT.
JP thought hopefully about his future GMAT score.

But:

JP will, it is hoped, receive a high score on the GMAT.

or:

It is hoped that JP will receive a high score on the GMAT.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 16 Jul 2003
Posts: 32
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2003, 06:21
I selected B. but need some more explanation about the use of "hopefully" in A. Is "hopefully" misplaced, or misused as well?
I mean if position is changed from " hopefully will enable" to "will hopefully enable", will A also be correct? or "hopefully" is not proper in either position.

Can I say safely here that in original sentence "hopefully will enable" = "may enable"? If yes, B is changing the meaning.
Need help from verbal gurus!!
Eternal Intern
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jun 2003
Posts: 480
Location: Lone Star State
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 28 Jul 2003, 07:08
JP, can you clarify explanation for comparison, I am working on that stuff.

:wink:
_________________

Ride em cowboy

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2009
Posts: 266
Location: New York, NY
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 35 [0], given: 23

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC: Can someone clarify faulty comparsion for C and D [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2009, 10:49
It's been 6 years and still no OA :x
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 388
Location: United States
Concentration: General Management, Technology
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 74 [0], given: 32

CAT Tests
Re: SC: Can someone clarify faulty comparsion for C and D [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2011, 20:52
TraderAK wrote:
Curly05 wrote:
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable astronomers to study the actual formation of black holes and neutron stars.

A) in the way electromagnetic waves do, hopefully will enable
B) in the way electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable
C) like electromagnetic waves, hopefully will enable
D) like electromagnetic waves, would enable, hopefully
E) such as electromagnetic waves do, will, it is hoped, enable



My answer B.


Is there any justification of the usage of "in the way" ? Any other example of the usage from OG or other reliable source...
_________________

If you know what you're worth, then go out and get what you're worth. But you gotta be willing to take the hits, and not pointing fingers saying you ain't where you wanna be because of anybody! Cowards do that and You're better than that!
The path is long, but self-surrender makes it short; the way is difficult, but perfect trust makes it easy.

Fire the final bullet only when you are constantly hitting the Bull's eye, till then KEEP PRACTICING.
Failure establishes only this, that our determination to succeed was not strong enough.
Getting defeated is just a temporary notion, giving it up is what makes it permanent.

Press +1 Kudos, if you think my post gave u a tiny tip.

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 658
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 79 [0], given: 51

GMAT Tests User
Re: [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2011, 21:49
JP wrote:
(B) is right. Technically, the word "hopefully" is an adverb form of the word "hopeful," which is used to describe one's state of mind about a particular thing.

For example:

JP is hopeful that he will get a good score on the GMAT.
JP thought hopefully about his future GMAT score.

But:

JP will, it is hoped, receive a high score on the GMAT.

or:

It is hoped that JP will receive a high score on the GMAT.


rightly said, 'hopefully' is an adverb. so is it the wrong modifier in A ? 'it is hoped' is an adjective clause ? so it can modify gravity waves ? is 'gravity waves' used as a noun in this sentence ?

can anybody elaborate more ?
_________________

What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy.

Re:   [#permalink] 07 Mar 2011, 21:49
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter vivektripathi 7 25 Dec 2008, 05:03
7 The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter chan4312 17 23 Jul 2008, 07:25
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter GK_Gmat 5 21 Oct 2007, 23:59
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter bewakoof 6 13 Jan 2006, 15:11
The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter christoph 8 22 Jan 2005, 07:13
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The use of gravity waves, which do not interact with matter

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.