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There are two SCs here, for a reason. I would like to know

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Director
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There are two SCs here, for a reason. I would like to know [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2007, 16:56
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E

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There are two SCs here, for a reason. I would like to know why in one case we are comparing law to laws and in another case, comparing students to students. If you don't get what I say, scroll down.

Please explain your answers.

The Hindu religious and moral law called dharma, like the Jewish laws, are an everlasting source of guidance, since they are both time-tested and comprehensive.
(A) like the Jewish laws, are an everlasting source of guidance, since they are both time-tested and comprehensive.

(B) like the Jewish laws, is an everlasting source of guidance, since it is both time-tested and comprehensive

(C) like the Jewish laws, is a source of guidance forever, being both time-tested and comprehensive

(D) since they are both time-tested and comprehensive, like the Jewish laws, are a source of guidance for life

(E) both time-tested and comprehensive, are like the Jewish laws, an everlasting source of guidance


2. Just as a student trying to understand life among Greek warriors might study the epic poems of Homer, in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays by Shakespeare.

(A) in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizebathan England might well study plays

(B) in the same way students, who try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play

(C) so a student trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays

(D) so do students try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play

(E) then students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England could well study plays
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2007, 17:37
Answers B & C respectively.

Please let us know the OA.

Just as you can compare

1. an individual to another individual
OR
2. an individual to a group

So you can compare

1. A law to many laws
and
2. A student to many students
Director
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Re: SC: Jewish laws && Greek warriors [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2007, 17:43
eyunni wrote:
There are two SCs here, for a reason. I would like to know why in one case we are comparing law to laws and in another case, comparing students to students. If you don't get what I say, scroll down.

Please explain your answers.

The Hindu religious and moral law called dharma, like the Jewish laws, are an everlasting source of guidance, since they are both time-tested and comprehensive.
(A) like the Jewish laws, are an everlasting source of guidance, since they are both time-tested and comprehensive.

(B) like the Jewish laws, is an everlasting source of guidance, since it is both time-tested and comprehensive

(C) like the Jewish laws, is a source of guidance forever, being both time-tested and comprehensive

(D) since they are both time-tested and comprehensive, like the Jewish laws, are a source of guidance for life

(E) both time-tested and comprehensive, are like the Jewish laws, an everlasting source of guidance


2. Just as a student trying to understand life among Greek warriors might study the epic poems of Homer, in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays by Shakespeare.

(A) in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizebathan England might well study plays

(B) in the same way students, who try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play

(C) so a student trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays

(D) so do students try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play

(E) then students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England could well study plays


i get B and C

1) here we are comparing dharma to Jewish laws hence the use of "like".. also dharma is singular so we need SVA; so B for the answer

2) for this one, we should immediately spot the idiom "just as.. so" idiom which only leaves us with C and D. between these two, C is parallel to the beginning of the sentence, just as "a student trying"... so "a student trying.."
Director
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2007, 17:54
Is it not required to compare law with 'law' and not with 'laws'? I came across a few SCs (like the second one above), where singular subject is compared to a singular subject and plural with plural. Infact, Kaplan explanation for the second SC is:

2. Just as a student trying to understand life among Greek warriors might study the epic poems of Homer, in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays by Shakespeare.
(A) in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizebathan England might well study plays
(B) in the same way students, who try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play
(C) so a student trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays
(D) so do students try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play
(E) then students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England could well study plays

"This sentence contains a nonparallel construction. An anology is being drawn between "a student trying to understand Greek warriors" and "students trying to understand courtly life". (1) is out. To make the construction parallel, the analogy should be made between "a student" interested in courtly life. (3) makes this correction, and it improves the sentence by changing the phrase "in the same way" at the beginning of the underlined portion to "so". (2), (3) and (4) fail to correct the parallel construction error."

If the above explanation is valid, then in the first SC, how is it possible to maintain parallelism by comparing law with laws? I am confused. Please clarify.
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2007, 18:26
eyunni wrote:
Is it not required to compare law with 'law' and not with 'laws'? I came across a few SCs (like the second one above), where singular subject is compared to a singular subject and plural with plural. Infact, Kaplan explanation for the second SC is:

2. Just as a student trying to understand life among Greek warriors might study the epic poems of Homer, in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays by Shakespeare.
(A) in the same way students trying to understand courtly life in Elizebathan England might well study plays
(B) in the same way students, who try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play
(C) so a student trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study plays
(D) so do students try and understand courtly life in Elizabethan England might well study a play
(E) then students trying to understand courtly life in Elizabethan England could well study plays

"This sentence contains a nonparallel construction. An anology is being drawn between "a student trying to understand Greek warriors" and "students trying to understand courtly life". (1) is out. To make the construction parallel, the analogy should be made between "a student" interested in courtly life. (3) makes this correction, and it improves the sentence by changing the phrase "in the same way" at the beginning of the underlined portion to "so". (2), (3) and (4) fail to correct the parallel construction error."

If the above explanation is valid, then in the first SC, how is it possible to maintain parallelism by comparing law with laws? I am confused. Please clarify.


I don't think that you can compare the two questions in the way you are thinking.

I think in the case of the first question, the comparison is non restrictive- add on to the sentence, whereas in the second, we have to keep parallelism with each dependent phrase... just as X, so do Y. SO X and Y have to be parallel.

for the first sentence:
I don't think a singular comparison would make sense "The Hindu religious and moral law called dharma, like the Jewish law" <= what Jewish law?? unless they specified a certain Jewish law, we are only stuck with the answer choices we are given. In this context, they are talking about dharma being similar to Jewish laws in general which is a valid comparison. I don't see any other way this could be worded correctly without some ambiguity.

Last edited by beckee529 on 21 Oct 2007, 18:46, edited 1 time in total.
Director
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Re: SC: Jewish laws && Greek warriors [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2007, 19:31
eyunni wrote:
The Hindu religious and moral law called dharma, like the Jewish laws, are an everlasting source of guidance, since they are both time-tested and comprehensive.

(A) like the Jewish laws, are an everlasting source of guidance, since they are both time-tested and comprehensive.
(B) like the Jewish laws, is an everlasting source of guidance, since it is both time-tested and comprehensive
(C) like the Jewish laws, is a source of guidance forever, being both time-tested and comprehensive
(D) since they are both time-tested and comprehensive, like the Jewish laws, are a source of guidance for life
(E) both time-tested and comprehensive, are like the Jewish laws, an everlasting source of guidance


B for this one as the subject is "Dharma". So singular verb "is" is required.
Re: SC: Jewish laws && Greek warriors   [#permalink] 21 Oct 2007, 19:31
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There are two SCs here, for a reason. I would like to know

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