Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 02 Sep 2015, 19:22
GMAT Club Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 1047
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 388 [0], given: 1

There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2008, 08:28
3
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

69% (01:52) correct 31% (00:39) wrong based on 73 sessions
There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe that young people have a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents and that the source of the change lies in the collapse of the "work ethic."

(A) a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(C) a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and grandparents
(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had
(E) a lessening of the commitment to work and a career that their parents and grandparents had

Source: GMATPrep
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

"You have to find it. No one else can find it for you." - Bjorn Borg


Last edited by Bunuel on 09 Jun 2015, 08:05, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and added the OA.
Kaplan Promo CodeKnewton GMAT Discount CodesVeritas Prep GMAT Discount Codes
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jun 2008
Posts: 547
WE 1: Investment Banking - 6yrs
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 92

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2008, 09:53
D

"had" is required because your comparing... x than y had.

E - akward & wordy.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 165
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 1

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2008, 09:59
amitdgr wrote:
Source: GMATPrep

There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe that young people have a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents and that the source of the change lies in the collapse of the "work ethic."

(A) a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(C) a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and grandparents
(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had
(E) a lessening of the commitment to work and a career that their parents and grandparents had



i will also go for D

you need 'had 'to make the comparison complete (between young people and parents &grandparents).
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 31 Jul 2008
Posts: 308
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 29 [0], given: 0

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2008, 10:05
yeh D

Had is required ; in C "than that of their parents" sounds attractive but the "that" is ambiguous and might refer to career
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 Jan 2008
Posts: 7
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 15 Oct 2008, 21:00
I take C. Is this the correct answer?
I assume "that" refers to the young people has smaller community to work .
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 16 Jan 2008
Posts: 108
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 4

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 15 Oct 2008, 22:13
C

than that of their parents and grandparents refers correctly to committment of parents and grandparents and makes clear comparision with committment of young people.
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 1047
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 388 [0], given: 1

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 15 Oct 2008, 22:38
technocrat wrote:
C

than that of their parents and grandparents refers correctly to committment of parents and grandparents and makes clear comparision with committment of young people.


The comparison is between "Young people" and "their parents and grandparents"

In C, the word "that" wrongly compares "young people" with "the commitment of their parents and grandparents"
_________________

"You have to find it. No one else can find it for you." - Bjorn Borg

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2008
Posts: 994
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 121 [0], given: 5

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2008, 11:27
I think the issue with C is smaller vs less.

I don't think you can count commitment, so thats why I chose less.

You need had in D to compare like things.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 1570
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 210 [0], given: 0

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2008, 13:25
D makes perfect sense for two reasons
1. It uses "less" in place of "smaller"
2. Parallelism due to "had".
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 839
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 45 [0], given: 0

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2008, 16:46
D for me. I think I remember this one from GMATprep
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 18 May 2008
Posts: 1293
Followers: 14

Kudos [?]: 211 [0], given: 0

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2008, 16:58
A and C are out because of usage of smaller.
B compares committment with parents and grandparents.
E is wordy and awkward
D is the best choice
amitdgr wrote:
Source: GMATPrep

There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe that young people have a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents and that the source of the change lies in the collapse of the "work ethic."

(A) a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(C) a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and grandparents
(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had
(E) a lessening of the commitment to work and a career that their parents and grandparents had
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 Sep 2008
Posts: 36
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2008, 22:22
I think it's D

because I think we need "had" here........??? not sure
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 Sep 2008
Posts: 5
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [1] , given: 0

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2008, 06:05
1
This post received
KUDOS
OA (D)

To maintain parallelism, HAD is required. The comparison is done between the commitment that young generation HAVE and older generation HAD.

Hope it makes sense....
Good Luck
Code Snooker
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Apr 2008
Posts: 449
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 75 [0], given: 1

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2008, 07:44
amitdgr wrote:
Source: GMATPrep

There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe that young people have a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents and that the source of the change lies in the collapse of the "work ethic."

(A) a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(C) a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and grandparents
(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had
(E) a lessening of the commitment to work and a career that their parents and grandparents had


IMO D) ... less of is required here since commitment is uncountable and verb is required in end
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 Nov 2010
Posts: 63
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 5

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2010, 15:27
OA = D "Less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had.
1 KUDOS received
Manhattan GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 185
Schools: MBA, Thunderbird School of Global Management / BA, Wesleyan University
Followers: 79

Kudos [?]: 138 [1] , given: 7

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2010, 19:49
1
This post received
KUDOS
People have danced around this issue here, but let's make it explicit:

"Smaller" and "larger" refer to physical size:

My dog is larger...
Your foot is smaller...
His house is smaller...

Since there is no physical size of "commitment," you really can't use "smaller" or "larger" to describe it.

"Less" and "more" can refer to magnitude:

I am less excited than you are.
You are more committed than I am.

Good times in GMAT land!
_________________


Brett Beach-Kimball | Manhattan GMAT Instructor

Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Reviews

SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 16 Jul 2009
Posts: 1634
Schools: CBS
WE 1: 4 years (Consulting)
Followers: 37

Kudos [?]: 513 [0], given: 2

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2011, 04:32
BKimball wrote:
People have danced around this issue here, but let's make it explicit:

"Smaller" and "larger" refer to physical size:

My dog is larger...
Your foot is smaller...
His house is smaller...

Since there is no physical size of "commitment," you really can't use "smaller" or "larger" to describe it.

"Less" and "more" can refer to magnitude:

I am less excited than you are.
You are more committed than I am.

Good times in GMAT land!


Many thanks.

Could you explain whether "had" is strictly required?

Thanks in advance. For me is so obvious that can be ommited. I think that it is called ellipsis.
_________________

The sky is the limit
800 is the limit


GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Jul 2010
Posts: 228
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 58 [0], given: 20

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2011, 05:46
Young people HAVE less of x.... than their parents and grandparents HAD

If 'had' is not added then I think quite literally the comparison does not work...

Young ppl have less of something (i.e., a category of persons having something) vs. their parents and grandparents (a category of persons simpliciter)

"ellipsis" as far as I am aware refers to omission of words when you quote someone and put ....... dots to lessen the length of the quote...

one place where a word can be omitted (according to the MGMAT SC book) is a word after a possessive noun

Sam's build is more muscular than Joe's. [one doesnt have to write Joe's build as that is implicit]
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 16 Jul 2009
Posts: 1634
Schools: CBS
WE 1: 4 years (Consulting)
Followers: 37

Kudos [?]: 513 [0], given: 2

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2011, 12:24
My point is that "had" is also implicit in this question.
Thoughts on that?
Thanks in advance.

gmat1011 wrote:
Young people HAVE less of x.... than their parents and grandparents HAD

If 'had' is not added then I think quite literally the comparison does not work...

Young ppl have less of something (i.e., a category of persons having something) vs. their parents and grandparents (a category of persons simpliciter)

"ellipsis" as far as I am aware refers to omission of words when you quote someone and put ....... dots to lessen the length of the quote...

one place where a word can be omitted (according to the MGMAT SC book) is a word after a possessive noun

Sam's build is more muscular than Joe's. [one doesnt have to write Joe's build as that is implicit]

_________________

The sky is the limit
800 is the limit


GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Manhattan GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 185
Schools: MBA, Thunderbird School of Global Management / BA, Wesleyan University
Followers: 79

Kudos [?]: 138 [0], given: 7

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2011, 17:44
noboru,

Great question! As codesnooker describes, this question really deals with comparisons. Remember that comparisons are just a special form of parallelism, so the items that you are comparing must be parallel.

Consider this example:

"I ate more pizza than you."
"I ate more pizza than you did."

Here, we are trying to compare the relative quantities of pizza eaten by you and I. However, the first example doesn't do that; the first example says that I ate more pizza than "you" (as if "you" is something else than I ate -- apparently less of").

You could say "I ate more pizza than salad" if you are trying to compare the nouns "pizza" and "salad." However, when you are comparing how much pizza I ATE to how much pizza YOU ATE, you need to keep that noun, verb structure parallel by using the noun (you) and the verb (did) in the second half just as you used the noun (I) and verb (ate) in the first half.

Check out codesnooker's explanation for how this works in this problem.

Brett
_________________


Brett Beach-Kimball | Manhattan GMAT Instructor

Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Reviews

Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t   [#permalink] 02 Jan 2011, 17:44

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 26 posts ] 

    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
5 Experts publish their posts in the topic There is a widespread belief in the US and Western Europe eybrj2 6 01 Dec 2011, 20:55
6 There is a widespread belief in the US and Western Europe noboru 13 23 Aug 2010, 14:47
2 There is a widespread belief in the United States and ... DenisSh 11 11 Oct 2009, 08:00
The public's widespread belief in the existence of mrmikec 15 01 Jun 2006, 11:52
7 Experts publish their posts in the topic There is a widespread belief in the United States and vikramm 14 24 Oct 2005, 18:27
Display posts from previous: Sort by

There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.