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This one has already been discussed, but think theres no

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This one has already been discussed, but think theres no [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2009, 14:19
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A
B
C
D
E

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This one has already been discussed, but think there´s no consensus yet:

559. One of Ronald Reagan’s first acts as President was to rescind President Carter’s directive that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States be prohibited from sale to other countries.

(A) that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States be prohibited from sale to other countries
(B) that any chemical be prohibited from sale to other countries that was banned on medical grounds in the United States
(C) prohibiting the sale to other countries of any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States
(D) prohibiting that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States is sold to other countries
(E) that any chemical banned in the United States on medical grounds is prohibited from being sold to other countries
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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2009, 20:23
It may be silly of me, but I didn't read any choices also as I was so impressed with the original question :)
Should be A.
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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2009, 00:59
imo A

A - best idiomatic use of prohibit.... from
B - too wordy
c,d,e - wrong idiomatic use of prohibit.... from
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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 01 May 2010, 07:36
Im also with A, but OA is C, which I cannot understand, since the correct idiom is prohibit from...

Can anybody explain?

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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 01 May 2010, 07:47
I was checking some verbal part on Manhattan.com and found that:

On GMAT, the "ing" ending of verb separated by a COMMA (example – prohibiting) essentially allows this modifier to modify an entire clause instead of just the immediately preceding noun. So, C is correct as per this rule and also it is concise.

Correct Idioms:
x prohibits (/forbids) y from z
x prohibits (/forbids) that y be z

Hope this helps.

noboru wrote:
This one has already been discussed, but think there´s no consensus yet:

559. One of Ronald Reagan’s first acts as President was to rescind President Carter’s directive that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States be prohibited from sale to other countries.

(A) that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States be prohibited from sale to other countries
(B) that any chemical be prohibited from sale to other countries that was banned on medical grounds in the United States
(C) prohibiting the sale to other countries of any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States
(D) prohibiting that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States is sold to other countries
(E) that any chemical banned in the United States on medical grounds is prohibited from being sold to other countries

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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2010, 08:51
ykaiim wrote:
I was checking some verbal part on Manhattan.com and found that:

On GMAT, the "ing" ending of verb separated by a COMMA (example – prohibiting) essentially allows this modifier to modify an entire clause instead of just the immediately preceding noun. So, C is correct as per this rule and also it is concise.

Correct Idioms:
x prohibits (/forbids) y from z
x prohibits (/forbids) that y be z

Hope this helps.

noboru wrote:
This one has already been discussed, but think there´s no consensus yet:

559. One of Ronald Reagan’s first acts as President was to rescind President Carter’s directive that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States be prohibited from sale to other countries.

(A) that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States be prohibited from sale to other countries
(B) that any chemical be prohibited from sale to other countries that was banned on medical grounds in the United States
(C) prohibiting the sale to other countries of any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States
(D) prohibiting that any chemical banned on medical grounds in the United States is sold to other countries
(E) that any chemical banned in the United States on medical grounds is prohibited from being sold to other countries


I dont know if I see yout point...

You are saying that, since "prohibiting" is an -ing construction, the idiom does not apply?
Please clarify.
Thanks,
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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2010, 09:34
I have personally observed that in most of the cases where you have the directive word.. its directly followed by the point itself and not that and then the point..

Thus, what I mean to say is.. directive ABCDEFF.... and not directive that ABCDEDEFF
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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2010, 09:36
temp33 wrote:
I have personally observed that in most of the cases where you have the directive word.. its directly followed by the point itself and not that and then the point..

Thus, what I mean to say is.. directive ABCDEFF.... and not directive that ABCDEDEFF


ok, i can agree with that, but...an idiom is an idiom...
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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2010, 10:30
noboru wrote:
temp33 wrote:
I have personally observed that in most of the cases where you have the directive word.. its directly followed by the point itself and not that and then the point..

Thus, what I mean to say is.. directive ABCDEFF.... and not directive that ABCDEDEFF


ok, i can agree with that, but...an idiom is an idiom...



You are right about the idiom that "prohibiting A from doing B".. then even "sale of" is the right idiom.. !
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Re: Ronald McDonald [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2010, 10:32
I have an idiom list as per which...
"do not take that to connect the next clause.
As in directive prohibiting is correct but directive that prohibited is wrong."
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Re: Ronald McDonald   [#permalink] 31 Jul 2010, 10:32
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