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Though it had about 11 inches of snow, aviation officials

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 [#permalink] New post 17 Nov 2006, 20:31
Where r u Matt? Just eager now... :beatup
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Nov 2006, 02:27
trivikram wrote:
Swagatalakshmi wrote:
Though it had about 11 inches of snow, aviation officials said conditions on the runway at the time of the emergency landing were acceptable.


(A) aviation officials said conditions on the runway at the time of the emergency landing were acceptable - This is correct.
"Though it had about 11 inches of snow" is not a modifier rather an adverbial clause; therfore, "runway" is not required immediately after "though ..snow".


(B) the runway had conditions during the emergency landing which were acceptable according to aviation officials (which is not referring to runway)

(C) the runway was in, according to aviation officials, acceptable conditions during the time of the emergency landing

This is a "subject- predicate nominative" problem and not a subject-verb problem. In this sentence, "was" is a linking verb and "conditions" is a predicate nominative that describes the subject "runway". However, "runway" is singular and "conditions" is plural. You can't say "John is painters", can you ?


(D) the runway was said by aviation officials to be in acceptable condition during the emergency landing - "runway was said to be" is passive and weird construction

(E) the runway's condition, at the time of the emergency landing, were acceptable according to the aviation officials
This is a subject-verb issue. "condition" can't have "were".


I have a couple of questions here.
Isnt runway noun?
So how can a adverbial clause modify a noun?

Thanks!


In the grammar book someone found on the princeton forum, are few explanations about the adv clause:
Quote:
An adverb clause begins with a subordinator—a word like when, because,
if, and although. Modifying a word, phrase, or clause, an adverb clause tells
such things as why, when, how, and under what conditions. Normally it
gives more information than a simple adverb does:

As the deer leaped onto the road, I hit the brakes.

An adverb clause also enables you to subordinate
As he was being tackled, he threw the ball.


An adverb clause of result and comparison normally follows the main
clause. But most other adverb clauses are movable. So where do you put
them?
To be clear-cut and straightforward, lead with your main clause and let
the adverb clause follow:
The colonel ordered an investigation as soon as he heard the complaint of the enlisted men.
I worked in a department store for a year so that I could earn money for college.

This kind of order has a brisk, no-nonsense effect, and you will seldom go
wrong with it. But it is not always the best order. To create suspense, or to
build up to your main point, put the adverb clause at the beginning and
save the main clause for the end.


So I cannot find anything against A...
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Nov 2006, 06:19
karlfurt wrote:
trivikram wrote:
Swagatalakshmi wrote:
Though it had about 11 inches of snow, aviation officials said conditions on the runway at the time of the emergency landing were acceptable.


(A) aviation officials said conditions on the runway at the time of the emergency landing were acceptable - This is correct.
"Though it had about 11 inches of snow" is not a modifier rather an adverbial clause; therfore, "runway" is not required immediately after "though ..snow".


(B) the runway had conditions during the emergency landing which were acceptable according to aviation officials (which is not referring to runway)

(C) the runway was in, according to aviation officials, acceptable conditions during the time of the emergency landing

This is a "subject- predicate nominative" problem and not a subject-verb problem. In this sentence, "was" is a linking verb and "conditions" is a predicate nominative that describes the subject "runway". However, "runway" is singular and "conditions" is plural. You can't say "John is painters", can you ?


(D) the runway was said by aviation officials to be in acceptable condition during the emergency landing - "runway was said to be" is passive and weird construction

(E) the runway's condition, at the time of the emergency landing, were acceptable according to the aviation officials
This is a subject-verb issue. "condition" can't have "were".


I have a couple of questions here.
Isnt runway noun?
So how can a adverbial clause modify a noun?

Thanks!


In the grammar book someone found on the princeton forum, are few explanations about the adv clause:
Quote:
An adverb clause begins with a subordinator—a word like when, because,
if, and although. Modifying a word, phrase, or clause, an adverb clause tells
such things as why, when, how, and under what conditions. Normally it
gives more information than a simple adverb does:

As the deer leaped onto the road, I hit the brakes.

An adverb clause also enables you to subordinate
As he was being tackled, he threw the ball.


An adverb clause of result and comparison normally follows the main
clause. But most other adverb clauses are movable. So where do you put
them?
To be clear-cut and straightforward, lead with your main clause and let
the adverb clause follow:
The colonel ordered an investigation as soon as he heard the complaint of the enlisted men.
I worked in a department store for a year so that I could earn money for college.

This kind of order has a brisk, no-nonsense effect, and you will seldom go
wrong with it. But it is not always the best order. To create suspense, or to
build up to your main point, put the adverb clause at the beginning and
save the main clause for the end.


So I cannot find anything against A...


Thanks Kal.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2006, 03:31
D for me.

A is wrong because runway needs to follow the clause immediately to have the clear meaning for "it"..

B is wrong because "which" is placed after landing.

E is wrong because "the runway's" is used instead of "runway", leaving "it" without a reference.

finally, C is wrong, at least to me, because it separates the phrase in.... condition.


Though D is wordy, it is right.
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2006, 07:19
Sorry to be late posting here guys: OA is (D)
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2006, 09:42
GMATT73 wrote:
Sorry to be late posting here guys: OA is (D)


What a bummer! :(

Matt - could you reveal the source of this question please? I still believe A is correct, but I am willing to forego my obstinate stickiness in lieu of some credible explanation for D.

I believe A has the right opening in its adverbial clause - adverbial clauses are known to modify full sentences and not depend on a subject for their existence. Then why is A incorrect? Simply because the "it" aint pointing to the "runway"????

Sad!
  [#permalink] 20 Nov 2006, 09:42
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