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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that

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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2005, 02:06
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2005, 04:38
Wow... this is a tough one.

Is the answer B. when the insect stops at regular intervals it signals, that the insect is tired, and after a moment's rest, it resumes the chase.

Choices A, D and E do not support either of these theories.

Even C looks a little plausible. When the beetle increases its speed after a chase, it could signify that the beetle has regained sight, and sees the prey slipping away, and runs even faster to catch it.

For now, my answer is B
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2005, 04:54
B

A - No. It undermines both.
B - Keep. The first part undermines the "blind" hypothesis of the beetles and the second supports the "rest" hypothesis
C - No. This weakens the "rest" hypothesis. If the beetle increased its speed then it should pause sooner. But the beetle maintain a fixed time interval between pauses. It also weakens the "blind" hypthesis becos the beetle is able to see the stationary insect moving
D - No. Out of scope.
E - No. This just weakens the "blind" hypothesis but does not support the "rest" hypthesis.

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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2005, 05:16
Picked C.

If they rest as specific time intervals even if visual info is changing at different rates , they do so not to process info, in which case they would pause much frequently when in hot pursuit , and less frequently when they move slowly.
That they have to pause at specific intervals, not matter what the situation is suggests it as being a pause to recoup.(probably they can't breathe while running and they have to breathe at fixed intervals )

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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2005, 01:04
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ОА is C

Yes, this is a tough one.

Let's analize B and C (it's easy to eliminate A,D,E)
We have Theory 1: they pause to have rest
and Theory 2: they pause to process visual information

B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
=> The visual info is rocessed OK. Theory 2 is undermined. When you go down an incline - it's easier for you to go, so you need rest rarely. But here it is said that no matter up or down - the intervals are equal. Theory 1 is also undermined.

C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
=> Speed increases after pause - not after the insect begins to flee: that means that Theory 2 has a point - there's a problem with visual info. Intervals remain the same: speed_before*time < speed_after*time - the distance is greater, and the beetle is not tired. This undermines Theory 1.

Here it is, I think.
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 18 Dec 2005, 21:23
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B. In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.
C. In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E. The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.
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Re: CR-tiger beetles [#permalink] New post 18 Dec 2005, 22:37
B does so.....
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2005, 01:14
B here.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2005, 02:30
yup it should be B.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2005, 09:59
I took some time but got B as well.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2005, 10:54
B it is.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2005, 21:05
OA is B
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 11:10
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment’s rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect’s direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

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Last edited by ceointhemaking on 16 Jan 2006, 16:18, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 11:44
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IMO its B

(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping. - this will prove that the beetle dosen't go blind & dosen't get tired - wrong
(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses. this will prove the beetle dosen't go blind but does get tired - GOOD
(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses qually frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. - will prove dosen't go blind & dosen't get tired - wrong
(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit. - will prove ...nothing
(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops. -- will prove that the beetle does go blind or does get tired. we cannot be sure. - wrong
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 12:01
I think it is B as well
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 15:19
I think its C..

(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses qually frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

There r 2 theories here
a) States that insect stops because it gets tired and so needs rest
b) States that insect stops because it needs time to put in the information in its mind

C states that the prey is changing directions, so the beetle needs to stop so that it can put in the new info in its mind (proving theory B correct).It also states that the bettle pauses frequently if the chase is up or down means that when its going down ( as per gravity) it still needs to stop..Ideally if theory a is to be correct then insect should stop less during downhill and more during its journey uphill..So there's something else to it which forces insect to stop that often

so C

OA plz?
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 16:03
andy_gr8 wrote:
I think its C..

(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses qually frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

There r 2 theories here
a) States that insect stops because it gets tired and so needs rest
b) States that insect stops because it needs time to put in the information in its mind

C states that the prey is changing directions, so the beetle needs to stop so that it can put in the new info in its mind (proving theory B correct).It also states that the bettle pauses frequently if the chase is up or down means that when its going down ( as per gravity) it still needs to stop..Ideally if theory a is to be correct then insect should stop less during downhill and more during its journey uphill..So there's something else to it which forces insect to stop that often

so C

OA plz?




Sorry, OA is B.

I was confused by this question too. I thought that A would prove that physical strength is not an issue for the beetle since it could run away without stopping (although due to fear possibly), thus favors the second hypothesis. Anyone care to point out why my reasoning is wrong?

The OE says for (B): This statement provides information that strengthens the second hypothesis: the swerving pursuit and the resulting continual course adjustments appear to be forcing the beetle to stop with increasing freuency to sort out the the erratic visual information.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 17:03
Here is why I think it is not C.

Infact C proves that both hypotheses are inorrect.
It can change course - perception is not a problem.
It usually frequently rests whether it is incline or down. - Rest is not the reson they stop. If it were true that they rest frequently during an uphill chase and less frequently during downhill chase, then the first hypothesis would be supported.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 22:38
giddi77 wrote:
Here is why I think it is not C.

Infact C proves that both hypotheses are inorrect.
It can change course - perception is not a problem.
It usually frequently rests whether it is incline or down. - Rest is not the reson they stop. If it were true that they rest frequently during an uphill chase and less frequently during downhill chase, then the first hypothesis would be supported.


giddi
But isnt it like this

It can change course, but its stopping -so means tht its taking time to get the image of the prey into brain and thts why its stopping as its brain cant take in that much information quickly... Just as wht the premise states... If thats true then stmtm 1 is correct..
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2006, 22:49
Phew! Got (B) by POE in just under 3 minutes. It supports the second claim, but disproves the first.
  [#permalink] 16 Jan 2006, 22:49
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