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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture

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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2007, 10:40
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

Please explain the answers.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2014, 09:38
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vina wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

Please explain the answers.


Two hypothesis:
1) Pauses to rest
2) Pauses to determine the visual information

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
1) if the beetle pauses to rest , how can it move away without pausing? - Doesn't support
2) If the beetle pauses to determine the visual information, how come the beetle goes away. It should pause and figure out the new information - Doesn't support


B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.
1) Pauses to rest -> The pausing should not be more frequent but constant -> Doesn't support
2) Pauses to determine the visual information. As the motion is swerving, the visual information changes quite frequently and supports the 2nd hypothesis


C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
1) Pauses to rest -> Cannot pause equally frequently in both up slope and down slop -> Doesn't support
2) Pauses to determine the visual information -> "a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction" -> Doesn't support


D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
1) Pauses to rest -> above information doesn't support
2) Pauses to determine the visual information -> Above information doesn't support


E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.
1) pauses to rest -> faster the beetle pursues , frequently it stops -. Supports the hypothesis
2) pauses to determine the visual information -> faster it pursues -> faster the visual information changes and more frequently it stops -> Supports the hypothsis


hence B)
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2012, 09:09
vina wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

IMO B

Two hypo: 1) Beetle stops to take rest
2) It stops to adjust with changing visual information



A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

from first part of the sentence,it seems that beetle is frightened by insect and hence runs away, but that is not the case.Henec does not support 2nd hypo. Although, 2nd part of sentence undermines the 1st hypo.


B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

1st part of sentence undermines 2nd hypo, and second part supprts 1st hypo

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
chase up down irrelevnet


D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit. irrelevnet


E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.
Does not undermine any of two hypo
Please explain the answers.

OA Please
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2012, 13:23
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2013, 07:12
vina wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

Please explain the answers.

OA please? This one was a bit tough.. I ultimately chose (E) because the pace has to do with the frequency it stops therefore strengthening one of the hypotehsis
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2013, 07:12
vina wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

Please explain the answers.

This time I did it I chose (E). Funny thing, anyways. Need a clear explanation on this one and i'll make it rain some Kudos

Last edited by jlgdr on 14 Oct 2013, 11:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2013, 23:47
This is my point of view for this really hard question:

We have to chose whether the tiger beetles is following one of the two hypothesis proposed. In fact, this question is simple when you take the words that are in the text. The first hypothesis states that the TB cannot maintain their pace and pause for moments of rest. The second states that rapidly changes in visual information lead to the blindness of the TB and then the TB has to STOP.

Therefore :

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping. totally irrelevant
B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses. wrong, because the statement two STATES THAT THE TB NEEDS TO STOP. Here they are saying that TB, following the visual change still continues to follow the prey and do not stop
C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. CORRECT, this answer choice is saying that the statement one is correct and the second two need to be wrong while the TB do not stop
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit. Irrelevant
E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops. Irrelevant
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 30 Oct 2013, 12:27
I would say D. Try and find a case where both hypothesis cannot be true together:

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

This tells us that the beetle is not blind. However, it does not give us any evidence on that pace has been increased. Inconclusive.

B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

The beetle can clearly see, however, the frequent pauses cannot be attributed to the beetle running at a faster pace than normal. Inconclusive.

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

The beetle is clearly not blind, however, pausing cannot be attributed to change of pace. Inconclusive.

D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

This tells us that the beetle must be blind. If the beetle was not blind, and could see the prey, it would increase its speed and have more frequent stops. However, by being blind, the beetle runs, only to see the prey just as far away as before its run. Therefore, the beetle did not see the pray move and is confused as to why it has not gained on it. This discourages the beetle. This statement tells us that the beetle stops to look for location of the prey, not due to exhaustion.

E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

We cannot tell if the beetle is blind or not. Perhaps the frequent stops are due to the beetle checking for the insect. Perhaps It is due to change of pace. Inconclusive.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 30 Oct 2013, 14:32
forevertfc wrote:
I would say D. Try and find a case where both hypothesis cannot be true together:

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

This tells us that the beetle is not blind. However, it does not give us any evidence on that pace has been increased. Inconclusive.

B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

The beetle can clearly see, however, the frequent pauses cannot be attributed to the beetle running at a faster pace than normal. Inconclusive.

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

The beetle is clearly not blind, however, pausing cannot be attributed to change of pace. Inconclusive.

D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

This tells us that the beetle must be blind. If the beetle was not blind, and could see the prey, it would increase its speed and have more frequent stops. However, by being blind, the beetle runs, only to see the prey just as far away as before its run. Therefore, the beetle did not see the pray move and is confused as to why it has not gained on it. This discourages the beetle. This statement tells us that the beetle stops to look for location of the prey, not due to exhaustion.

E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

We cannot tell if the beetle is blind or not. Perhaps the frequent stops are due to the beetle checking for the insect. Perhaps It is due to change of pace. Inconclusive.


If you want better and more "official" explanations: http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/tig ... t3238.html

OA is C!

Hope it helps!
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 05 Nov 2013, 15:50
Paris75 wrote:

If you want better and more "official" explanations: http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/tig ... t3238.html

OA is C!

Hope it helps!


I just came across this in the OG, and in fact the OA is B!

I see that it has also been revised to say so on the link you provided.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2013, 00:40
forevertfc wrote:
Paris75 wrote:

If you want better and more "official" explanations: http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/tig ... t3238.html

OA is C!

Hope it helps!


I just came across this in the OG, and in fact the OA is B!

I see that it has also been revised to say so on the link you provided.


Answer here is C!
Watch out, there are several types of the same question (one in the OG, one on the the GmatPrep...) ... And all the answers are not C!

Hope it helps!
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2014, 11:26
the answer on the official guide is B, the explanation was cause the beetle has to stop to adjust the erratic movements going on around which "increases the frequency to sort out the erratic visual motion."
seriously, this is not a well-written question. The GMAC would be definately assuming that turning round produces erratic visual motion. How would a dog that chases its tail be explained?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxig2AF1-gw
Plus it doesn't support the other hypothesis as required by the question.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture   [#permalink] 04 Mar 2014, 11:26
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