Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 20 Aug 2014, 01:08

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Top college graduates are having more difficulty

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 04 Jan 2008
Posts: 919
Followers: 44

Kudos [?]: 158 [0], given: 17

GMAT Tests User
Top college graduates are having more difficulty [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2009, 01:49
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 100% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
13. Top college graduates are having more difficulty demonstrating their superiority to prospective employers than did the top students of twenty years ago when an honors degree was distinction enough. Today’s employers are less impressed with the honors degree. Twenty years ago no more than 10 percent of a given class graduated with honors. Today, however, because of grade inflation, the honors degree goes to more than 50 percent of a graduating class. Therefore, to restore confidence in the degrees they award, colleges must take steps to control grade inflation.

Which one of the following is an assumption that, if true, would support the conclusion in the passage?

(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago.
(B) Awarding too many honors degrees causes colleges to inflate grades.
(C) Today’s employers rely on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions.
(D) It is not easy for students with low grades to obtain jobs.
(E) Colleges must make employers aware of the criteria used to determine who receives an honors degree.


pls show me denial/negation part
_________________

math-polygons-87336.html
competition-for-the-best-gmat-error-log-template-86232.html

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Apr 2008
Posts: 909
Schools: IIM Lucknow (IPMX) - Class of 2014
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 203 [0], given: 18

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2009, 22:48
I go with A. OA and source?

A because:
in the argument it is assumed that grades are inflated => students are not that good still they get good grades...and hence it is necessary to control grade inflation.

Very tricky..would like to hear from others.

nitya34 wrote:
13. Top college graduates are having more difficulty demonstrating their superiority to prospective employers than did the top students of twenty years ago when an honors degree was distinction enough. Today’s employers are less impressed with the honors degree. Twenty years ago no more than 10 percent of a given class graduated with honors. Today, however, because of grade inflation, the honors degree goes to more than 50 percent of a graduating class. Therefore, to restore confidence in the degrees they award, colleges must take steps to control grade inflation.

Which one of the following is an assumption that, if true, would support the conclusion in the passage?

(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago.
(B) Awarding too many honors degrees causes colleges to inflate grades.
(C) Today’s employers rely on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions.
(D) It is not easy for students with low grades to obtain jobs.
(E) Colleges must make employers aware of the criteria used to determine who receives an honors degree.


pls show me denial/negation part
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Apr 2009
Posts: 160
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2009, 07:01
passage premises tells..
Grades are Inflated; That students of this age don't deserve these grades which they get, than students of 20 years ago
So only assumption while considering grades as inflated is
(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Posts: 256
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2009, 07:10
IMO it's clear B.
I don't think it's A because students being high achievers or not have nothing to do with colleges being too generous with grades.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Apr 2009
Posts: 160
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2009, 07:40
You are right B clears
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 23 Mar 2009
Posts: 19
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2009, 13:06
A
oa??
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Apr 2009
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 11 Apr 2009, 01:56
13. Top college graduates are having more difficulty demonstrating their superiority to prospective employers than did the top students of twenty years ago when an honors degree was distinction enough. Today’s employers are less impressed with the honors degree. Twenty years ago no more than 10 percent of a given class graduated with honors. Today, however, because of grade inflation, the honors degree goes to more than 50 percent of a graduating class. Therefore, to restore confidence in the degrees they award, colleges must take steps to control grade inflation.

Which one of the following is an assumption that, if true, would support the conclusion in the passage?

(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago.
(B) Awarding too many honors degrees causes colleges to inflate grades.
(C) Today’s employers rely on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions.
(D) It is not easy for students with low grades to obtain jobs.
(E) Colleges must make employers aware of the criteria used to determine who receives an honors degree.

I think A is right: If today's student's were higher achievers than those 10 years back, then the higher number of honors degrees would be in coherence with this (no grade inflation). But, if they are not, then the higher number of honors degrees being awarded does not make sense (grade inflation)

B: This is a statement already in the passage. So restating it would not add any weight to the existing stand.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 29 Aug 2005
Posts: 881
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 147 [0], given: 7

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 11 Apr 2009, 04:16
A.
In B, I dont understand what "too many" means.

nitya34 wrote:
13. Top college graduates are having more difficulty demonstrating their superiority to prospective employers than did the top students of twenty years ago when an honors degree was distinction enough. Today’s employers are less impressed with the honors degree. Twenty years ago no more than 10 percent of a given class graduated with honors. Today, however, because of grade inflation, the honors degree goes to more than 50 percent of a graduating class. Therefore, to restore confidence in the degrees they award, colleges must take steps to control grade inflation.

Which one of the following is an assumption that, if true, would support the conclusion in the passage?

(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago.
(B) Awarding too many honors degrees causes colleges to inflate grades.
(C) Today’s employers rely on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions.
(D) It is not easy for students with low grades to obtain jobs.
(E) Colleges must make employers aware of the criteria used to determine who receives an honors degree.


pls show me denial/negation part
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 1941
Schools: CBS, Kellogg
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 269 [0], given: 1

Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 11 Apr 2009, 23:01
nitya34 wrote:
13. Top college graduates are having more difficulty demonstrating their superiority to prospective employers than did the top students of twenty years ago when an honors degree was distinction enough. Today’s employers are less impressed with the honors degree. Twenty years ago no more than 10 percent of a given class graduated with honors. Today, however, because of grade inflation, the honors degree goes to more than 50 percent of a graduating class. Therefore, to restore confidence in the degrees they award, colleges must take steps to control grade inflation.

Which one of the following is an assumption that, if true, would support the conclusion in the passage?

(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago.
(B) Awarding too many honors degrees causes colleges to inflate grades.
(C) Today’s employers rely on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions.
(D) It is not easy for students with low grades to obtain jobs.
(E) Colleges must make employers aware of the criteria used to determine who receives an honors degree.


pls show me denial/negation part


I dont like this tech., The theory is simple by removing "NOT" from any choice that has "NOT" in its own and adding "NOT" to the choice that hasnt, applying meaning of the choice to the argument. It is terrible for me.

I think, recognizing the argument and noticing how the reasoning flows is better

A too,
_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 19 Oct 2008
Posts: 22
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 2

Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 12 Apr 2009, 04:00
I go for A
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Apr 2009
Posts: 4
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 12 Apr 2009, 07:04
I will go with B.

not A because one cannot conclude from if employers are not impressed by honors student they will not be higher achievers moreover non - honors students can also be higher achievers.
Please correct me if i am wrong...


nitya34 wrote:
13. Top college graduates are having more difficulty demonstrating their superiority to prospective employers than did the top students of twenty years ago when an honors degree was distinction enough. Today’s employers are less impressed with the honors degree. Twenty years ago no more than 10 percent of a given class graduated with honors. Today, however, because of grade inflation, the honors degree goes to more than 50 percent of a graduating class. Therefore, to restore confidence in the degrees they award, colleges must take steps to control grade inflation.

Which one of the following is an assumption that, if true, would support the conclusion in the passage?

(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago.
(B) Awarding too many honors degrees causes colleges to inflate grades.
(C) Today’s employers rely on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions.
(D) It is not easy for students with low grades to obtain jobs.
(E) Colleges must make employers aware of the criteria used to determine who receives an honors degree.


pls show me denial/negation part
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Oct 2008
Posts: 119
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 69 [0], given: 0

Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 12 Apr 2009, 07:40
This is somewhat tricky. (A) is the correct answer, but it is not quite obvious because it addresses a well hidden assumption in the middle of a fairly long argument. The argument goes something like this:

20 years ago, no more than 10% of a graduating class received honors.

Today, more than 50% of a graduating class usually receives honors.

The change was caused by grade inflation.

Employers have less confidence in the honors degree.

Therefore, colleges must stop grade inflation in order to restore confidence.

This looks very solid, but when we read (A), we should realize that there is in fact a hidden assumption. In the middle of the argument, there is a cause and effect claim: Grade inflation is the cause of the change in the honors percentage. Whenever there is a cause and effect claim, there is always an assumption that no other cause exists. (A) provides part of this assumption, by eliminating one other possible cause: The possibility that the students are just better.

(B) cannot be the answer because "giving too many honors degrees" is not a CAUSE of grade inflation; it is the DEFINITION of grade inflation.
_________________

Grumpy

Kaplan Canada LSAT/GMAT/GRE teacher and tutor

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 374
Location: India
Followers: 18

Kudos [?]: 55 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 12 Apr 2009, 17:16
I would also go with A.
Therefore, to restore confidence in the degrees they award, colleges must take steps to control grade inflation---> this assumes that students are getting higher grades just because of grade inflanation.

B also looks tempting choice but I dont feel it because it is assuming what it sets out to prove and does not look promising.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 318
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 42 [0], given: 1

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 13 Apr 2009, 20:53
(A) Today’s students are not higher achievers than the students of twenty years ago. – we can not say based on the information provided.
(B) Awarding too many honors degrees causes colleges to inflate grades. – out of scope.
(C) Today’s employers rely on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions. – this could be one of the reasons that employers still look at honors degree.
(D) It is not easy for students with low grades to obtain jobs. – out of scope.
(E) Colleges must make employers aware of the criteria used to determine who receives an honors degree. – criterias are not talked about in the statements given.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 840
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 26 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2009, 21:56
tough one, thought B at first too until grumpyoldman's expl..
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Posts: 256
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 16 Apr 2009, 07:13
grumpyoldman wrote:
This is somewhat tricky. (A) is the correct answer, but it is not quite obvious because it addresses a well hidden assumption in the middle of a fairly long argument. The argument goes something like this:

20 years ago, no more than 10% of a graduating class received honors.

Today, more than 50% of a graduating class usually receives honors.

The change was caused by grade inflation.

Employers have less confidence in the honors degree.

Therefore, colleges must stop grade inflation in order to restore confidence.

This looks very solid, but when we read (A), we should realize that there is in fact a hidden assumption. In the middle of the argument, there is a cause and effect claim: Grade inflation is the cause of the change in the honors percentage. Whenever there is a cause and effect claim, there is always an assumption that no other cause exists. (A) provides part of this assumption, by eliminating one other possible cause: The possibility that the students are just better.

(B) cannot be the answer because "giving too many honors degrees" is not a CAUSE of grade inflation; it is the DEFINITION of grade inflation.


Thank you, I switch to A as well.
Did not read the question with enough attention. The key to CR questions is to read the question attentively ( :beat myself).
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Aug 2008
Posts: 162
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 35 [0], given: 8

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 28 Oct 2009, 08:43
I go for A. If it is true the students now are higher achievers than 20 years ago then the argument falls apart
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 16 Jul 2009
Posts: 1634
Schools: CBS
WE 1: 4 years (Consulting)
Followers: 30

Kudos [?]: 220 [0], given: 2

GMAT Tests User
Re: Assumption Q#2 [#permalink] New post 02 May 2010, 10:31
But the aim of the grades' revision is to make the grades more reliable for the employers, so we are assuming that the employers are actually relying on honors ranking in making their hiring decisions.

What do u think about that?
_________________

The sky is the limit
800 is the limit


Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Re: Assumption Q#2   [#permalink] 02 May 2010, 10:31
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Top college graduates are having more difficulty tkarthi4u 3 16 Jun 2009, 06:26
1 Top college graduates are having more difficulty reply2spg 12 20 Feb 2009, 13:08
2 Top college graduates are having more difficulty goalsnr 10 06 Jun 2008, 07:08
Top college graduates are having more difficulty kripalkavi 6 23 Jan 2007, 07:05
Top college graduates are having more difficulty beyondinfinity 9 05 May 2006, 11:48
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Top college graduates are having more difficulty

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.