Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 22 Oct 2014, 20:38

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 42
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 11 [2] , given: 3

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2009, 21:50
2
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

54% (01:32) correct 46% (00:50) wrong based on 40 sessions
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will
be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as the current one.
A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit
as they are.
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jun 2009
Posts: 213
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 23 [1] , given: 9

Re: Traffic safety [#permalink] New post 07 Jul 2009, 04:34
1
This post received
KUDOS
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.
'...as the current one.' would be right so we have A, C and D.
'...likely that they will...' is too wordy. A is precise '...likely to...'.
_________________

"Always....Read between the lines"

1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 956
WE 1: 3.5 yrs IT
WE 2: 2.5 yrs Retail chain
Followers: 55

Kudos [?]: 733 [1] , given: 40

Re: Traffic safety [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2010, 04:53
1
This post received
KUDOS
I marked A but the set I have says OA is E :(.
_________________

Want to improve your CR: cr-methods-an-approach-to-find-the-best-answers-93146.html
Tricky Quant problems: 50-tricky-questions-92834.html
Important Grammer Fundamentals: key-fundamentals-of-grammer-our-crucial-learnings-on-sc-93659.html

1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: The last round
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Posts: 1317
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V34
Followers: 58

Kudos [?]: 497 [1] , given: 157

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Traffic safety [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2010, 05:06
1
This post received
KUDOS
1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: The last round
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Posts: 1317
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V34
Followers: 58

Kudos [?]: 497 [1] , given: 157

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Traffic safety [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2010, 05:16
1
This post received
KUDOS
3 KUDOS received
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 17 Feb 2010
Posts: 1560
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 225 [3] , given: 6

Re: Traffic safety [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2010, 12:26
3
This post received
KUDOS
correct idiom is "as likely as"

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as - incorrect idiom
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are - incorrect idiom
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as - incorrect idiom
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as - incorrect
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are [to exceed]. - correct

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are [to exceed] the current one [speed limit]
1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 589
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Finance
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 291 [1] , given: 20

Re: Traffic safety [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2010, 14:08
1
This post received
KUDOS
ritjn2003 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will
be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as the current one.
A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit
as they are.


Even I think option A draws a wrong analogy: "drivers will be equally likely to X as Y"
Should be "drivers will be equally like to X as they are (to) Y.
_________________

KUDOS me if you feel my contribution has helped you.

Expert Post
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Preparing for the another shot...!
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1425
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
Followers: 129

Kudos [?]: 645 [0], given: 62

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 25 Oct 2012, 05:32
Expert's post
"as" is used to compare clauses not verbs.
A clause is a group of words that containg among them a subject and a verb.
In the question mentioned, the not underlined portion is a noun phrase. So if we have to use "as" then make this particular noun phrase a clause by adding a verb.
On the reasons mentioned above, ACD are eliminated.
In B, I don't think that a sole "as" can withstand the pressure of comparing.Henceforth, as likely as is preferrable.
Hope that helps.
-s
_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Jun 2011
Posts: 73
Location: United States
Concentration: Accounting, Finance
WE: Accounting (Accounting)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 12

CAT Tests
Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 25 Oct 2012, 19:17
ritjn2003 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will
be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as the current one.
A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit
as they are.


Option E is correct. Whenever you see "As" being used for comparison, it must be followed by a clause. This leaves us with two options B & E. Between B & E, E has the correct idiom usage as X as.

Hope this helps.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 185
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 77 [0], given: 103

Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 23 Feb 2013, 21:52
Experts your comments on my approach:

equally likely.... as -> wrong
as likely......as -> correct


So a,b,c - out

d -> as likely that.... as current one-> from parallelism point need THAT
so wrong

correct option E:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.
as they are (to exceed) the current (speed limit).
_________________

If u can't jump the 700 wall , drill a big hole and cross it .. I can and I WILL DO IT ...need some encouragement and inspirations from U ALL

6 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Affiliations: CrackVerbal
Joined: 03 Oct 2013
Posts: 175
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
Followers: 21

Kudos [?]: 86 [6] , given: 2

Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2014, 23:08
6
This post received
KUDOS
BukrsGmat wrote:
Experts your comments on my approach:

equally likely.... as -> wrong
as likely......as -> correct


So a,b,c - out

d -> as likely that.... as current one-> from parallelism point need THAT
so wrong

correct option E:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.
as they are (to exceed) the current (speed limit).



Rule tested- Parallelism (ellipsis)

"to exceed" is implied in the second half of the sentence.

This is a case of ellipsis in comparison. In this some words omitted from the sentence to make it more concise. Both noun and verb can be omitted. The omitted words should be present in the first part of the sentence in the same form.

Jim's pen is brighter than Alex's (pen). - Correct! ("pen" is implies)
Jim is smarter than Alex (is). - Correct! ("is" is implied)

The omission of a noun for concision is straightforward. Just make sure that the 2 nouns in the sentence can be logically compared. But there are certain exceptions when you are deciding

whether to include a verb in the second half of the sentence.



Tense Shift

If the verb tense changes from the first to the second half of the sentence, then the verb must not be omitted in the second half.

· You look more beautiful think year than last year. - Incorrect

· You look more beautiful this year than you did last year.- Correct

Meaning Ambiguity-

Do not omit the verb if doing so will make the sentence’s meaning ambiguous.

I love my dog more than my friend. - Incorrect

Here, the intended meaning could be that I love my dog more than I love my friend, OR
that I love my dog more than my friend does. Since the omission of the verb in the second half of the sentence distorts the meaning, this sentence is incorrect on the GMAT.

·
I love my dog more than I love my friend.- Correct!

·
I love my dog more than my friend does.- Correct!



Coming to the option D and E

Option D makes a parallelism error. If we simplify, we get the following structures:


D. Drivers will be

as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit

as the current one (speed limit)

Comparing a clause with a noun phrase.



E. Drivers will be

as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit

as they are (to exceed ) the current one (speed limit)

Comparing two clauses.




As for the use of "that", both "likely that" and "likely to" are correct.

'Likely that' is correct.

It's likely that+ clause

Likely is often used with it as a subject

For example: It's likely that I'll be late.

The other usage is with infinitive

be likely to+ infinitive

For example: I'm likely to be late.


Hope this helps!
Dolly Sharma
Verbal Trainer
CrackVerbal
_________________

If you find our response valuable, please encourage us with Kudos!

Live online classes by 99th percentile instructors!
http://gmat.crackverbal.com/gmat-courses/online/gmat-live-course/

Get a FREE profile evaluation from CrackVerbal experts!
http://applications.crackverbal.com/free-resources/profile-evaluation/

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 20
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 10

Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 23 May 2014, 23:00
CrackVerbalGMAT wrote:
BukrsGmat wrote:
Experts your comments on my approach:

equally likely.... as -> wrong
as likely......as -> correct


So a,b,c - out

d -> as likely that.... as current one-> from parallelism point need THAT
so wrong

correct option E:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.
as they are (to exceed) the current (speed limit).



Rule tested- Parallelism (ellipsis)

"to exceed" is implied in the second half of the sentence.

This is a case of ellipsis in comparison. In this some words omitted from the sentence to make it more concise. Both noun and verb can be omitted. The omitted words should be present in the first part of the sentence in the same form.

Jim's pen is brighter than Alex's (pen). - Correct! ("pen" is implies)
Jim is smarter than Alex (is). - Correct! ("is" is implied)

The omission of a noun for concision is straightforward. Just make sure that the 2 nouns in the sentence can be logically compared. But there are certain exceptions when you are deciding

whether to include a verb in the second half of the sentence.



Tense Shift

If the verb tense changes from the first to the second half of the sentence, then the verb must not be omitted in the second half.

· You look more beautiful think year than last year. - Incorrect

· You look more beautiful this year than you did last year.- Correct

Meaning Ambiguity-

Do not omit the verb if doing so will make the sentence’s meaning ambiguous.

I love my dog more than my friend. - Incorrect

Here, the intended meaning could be that I love my dog more than I love my friend, OR
that I love my dog more than my friend does. Since the omission of the verb in the second half of the sentence distorts the meaning, this sentence is incorrect on the GMAT.

·
I love my dog more than I love my friend.- Correct!

·
I love my dog more than my friend does.- Correct!



Coming to the option D and E

Option D makes a parallelism error. If we simplify, we get the following structures:


D. Drivers will be

as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit

as the current one (speed limit)

Comparing a clause with a noun phrase.



E. Drivers will be

as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit

as they are (to exceed ) the current one (speed limit)

Comparing two clauses.




As for the use of "that", both "likely that" and "likely to" are correct.

'Likely that' is correct.

It's likely that+ clause

Likely is often used with it as a subject

For example: It's likely that I'll be late.

The other usage is with infinitive

be likely to+ infinitive

For example: I'm likely to be late.


Hope this helps!
Dolly Sharma
Verbal Trainer
CrackVerbal


Hi Dolly,
Thanks for the detailed explanation.

Any difference between 'equally likely' & 'as likely'?

How do we use them & where?

Thanks for your help!

Cheers
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Aug 2014
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2014, 08:52
Hello guys, I would like to ask a question and hope someone can help me. thank you!!!!

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are.

The answer is E no question about it.
I understand that the "they" is for the "driver" and the "current one" is for speed limit. Also we omit the "likely to exceed" between they and current one.
My question is why we can omit the "likely to exceed" and under what circumstance we can omit.
thank you guys so much, thank you!
Expert Post
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done!!
Joined: 29 Aug 2012
Posts: 424
Location: India
Followers: 22

Kudos [?]: 334 [0], given: 130

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2014, 08:55
Expert's post
phoenixDH wrote:
Hello guys, I would like to ask a question and hope someone can help me. thank you!!!!

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are.

The answer is E no question about it.
I understand that the "they" is for the "driver" and the "current one" is for speed limit. Also we omit the "likely to exceed" between they and current one.
My question is why we can omit the "likely to exceed" and under what circumstance we can omit.
thank you guys so much, thank you!



Merging similar topics.

Please read the above posts for explanation.

Also please read the rules before posting any questions.
_________________

Believe you can and you're halfway there- Theodore Roosevelt


Rules for posting in Quants Forum || Rules for posting in verbal forum

Improving from V30 to V40 | Improving from Q35-40 to Q47 | Bunuel Special Problem Collections New!!


Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be   [#permalink] 04 Aug 2014, 08:55
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be arorag 8 03 Oct 2008, 17:32
7 Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be goalsnr 7 18 Jun 2008, 19:35
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be stevegt 1 08 Jul 2007, 08:09
3 Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be Allen760 15 21 Oct 2006, 13:00
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be imaru 4 05 Aug 2006, 08:21
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.