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Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories

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Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2009, 16:31
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Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life and
landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 Selma Lagerlöf was the novelist who became the
first woman and was also the first Swedish writer to
win the Nobel Prize for Literature.
A. Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life
and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 Selma Lagerlöf was the novelist who
became the first woman and was also the first Swedish writer to win
B. She turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the
peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and novelist Selma Lagerlöf in
1909 became the first woman as well as the first Swedish writer that won
C. Selma Lagerlöf was a novelist who turned away from literary realism to write
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and in
1909 she became the first woman in addition to the first Swedish writer winning
D. A novelist who turned away from literary realism to write romantic stories about
the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, Selma Lagerlöf became in
1909 the first woman and also the first Swedish writer to win
E. As a novelist, Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909
becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA:D

a. "was" the novelist..passive...eliminate
b. "she" is too far from selma..eliminate.
c. passive eliminate
d. akward
e. my choice

Please explain guys
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Re: Selma Lagerlöf [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2009, 17:05
close call between C and D, choose D...in C, the and/parallelism structure is incorrectly used...

not A because what is turning away describing?

not B because who is she referring to in the first section...

not E because becoming...incorrect usage i think...
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Re: Selma Lagerlöf [#permalink]

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A. Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life
and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 Selma Lagerlöf was the novelist who
became the first woman and was also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

This answer choice presents two problems.
First "Selma Lagerlof" has to be after the comma because the modifier Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden refers to her.

Second who became the first woman is not parallel to was also the first Swedish

B. She turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the
peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and novelist Selma Lagerlöf in
1909 became the first woman as well as the first Swedish writer that won the Nobel Prize for Literature

that cannot refer to people.
In addition in coordination a pronoun in the first clause cannot have cataphoric reference to a noun phrase in the second clause; However I'm not sure whether GMAT tests this problem.
I don't like the parallelism either

C. Selma Lagerlöf was a novelist who turned away from literary realism to write
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and in
1909 she became the first woman in addition to the first Swedish writer winning the Nobel Prize for Literature

not parallelism with the clause who.
winning the Nobel Prize for Literature sounds really awkward. I'm not sure whether this is unidiomatic

D. A novelist who turned away from literary realism to write romantic stories about
the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, Selma Lagerlöf became in
1909 the first woman and also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

I don't see any problems with this one. Correct.

E. As a novelist, Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909
becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won

I think this generates a run-on/fragment sentence because we don't have either a subordinator or coordinator to join both clauses

[Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden]
and
[in 1909 becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won]

Also that cannot refer to people
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Re: Selma Lagerlöf [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2009, 01:10
I got D too..but i could do it in a mins time... pls comment on the my thinking?


That won seems akward to me ....it shuld be whu won... so eliminate b, e

Winning and in addition to in C is not idiomatic....

between A and D ...A has improper structure...

Modifier in the starting not modifying the noun rather modifying IN 1990....

IMO D
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Re: Selma Lagerlöf [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2009, 03:32
IMO D.

A is too long winded and unnecessary use of "ing".

B. it's unclear who is being discussed in the first half.

C. "winning" at the end of the sentence doesn't fit in

E. Doesn't quite flow as well.
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Re: Selma Lagerlöf [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2009, 11:35
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mikeCoolBoy wrote:
A. Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life
and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 Selma Lagerlöf was the novelist who
became the first woman and was also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

This answer choice presents two problems.
First "Selma Lagerlof" has to be after the comma because the modifier Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden refers to her.

Second who became the first woman is not parallel to was also the first Swedish

B. She turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the
peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and novelist Selma Lagerlöf in
1909 became the first woman as well as the first Swedish writer that won the Nobel Prize for Literature

that cannot refer to people.
In addition in coordination a pronoun in the first clause cannot have cataphoric reference to a noun phrase in the second clause; However I'm not sure whether GMAT tests this problem.
I don't like the parallelism either

C. Selma Lagerlöf was a novelist who turned away from literary realism to write
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and in
1909 she became the first woman in addition to the first Swedish writer winning the Nobel Prize for Literature

not parallelism with the clause who.
winning the Nobel Prize for Literature sounds really awkward. I'm not sure whether this is unidiomatic

D. A novelist who turned away from literary realism to write romantic stories about
the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, Selma Lagerlöf became in
1909 the first woman and also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

I don't see any problems with this one. Correct.

E. As a novelist, Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909
becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won

I think this generates a run-on/fragment sentence because we don't have either a subordinator or coordinator to join both clauses

[Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden]
and
[in 1909 becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won]

Also that cannot refer to people


Nice explanation!! +1 for you!! :)

It needs to be explained though!!
[/quote]In addition in coordination a pronoun in the first clause cannot have cataphoric reference to a noun phrase in the second clause; However I'm not sure whether GMAT tests this problem. [/quote]
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Re: Selma Lagerlöf [#permalink]

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Hussain15

In coordination (and, but, or), you shouldn't use a cataphoric reference.
Consider this example

She felt ill, but my mother said nothing.

In principle she cannot refer to mother here, whereas in subordination this is possible.

Although she felt ill, my mother said nothing.

IMO you can forget about this since I don't think is tested on GMAT
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Re: Selma Lagerlöf [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2009, 12:48
mikeCoolBoy wrote:
Hussain15

In coordination (and, but, or), you shouldn't use a cataphoric reference.
Consider this example

She felt ill, but my mother said nothing.

In principle she cannot refer to mother here, whereas in subordination this is possible.

Although she felt ill, my mother said nothing.

IMO you can forget about this since I don't think is tested on GMAT



Thanks for the response!! Got it now!! :)
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Re: Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories [#permalink]

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Re: Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2016, 08:30
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2016, 19:43
Hussain15 wrote:
mikeCoolBoy wrote:
A. Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life
and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 Selma Lagerlöf was the novelist who
became the first woman and was also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

This answer choice presents two problems.
First "Selma Lagerlof" has to be after the comma because the modifier Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden refers to her.

Second who became the first woman is not parallel to was also the first Swedish

B. She turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the
peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and novelist Selma Lagerlöf in
1909 became the first woman as well as the first Swedish writer that won the Nobel Prize for Literature

that cannot refer to people.
In addition in coordination a pronoun in the first clause cannot have cataphoric reference to a noun phrase in the second clause; However I'm not sure whether GMAT tests this problem.
I don't like the parallelism either

C. Selma Lagerlöf was a novelist who turned away from literary realism to write
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and in
1909 she became the first woman in addition to the first Swedish writer winning the Nobel Prize for Literature

not parallelism with the clause who.
winning the Nobel Prize for Literature sounds really awkward. I'm not sure whether this is unidiomatic

D. A novelist who turned away from literary realism to write romantic stories about
the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, Selma Lagerlöf became in
1909 the first woman and also the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

I don't see any problems with this one. Correct.

E. As a novelist, Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909
becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won

I think this generates a run-on/fragment sentence because we don't have either a subordinator or coordinator to join both clauses

[Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden]
and
[in 1909 becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won]

Also that cannot refer to people


Nice explanation!! +1 for you!! :)

It needs to be explained though!!
In addition in coordination a pronoun in the first clause cannot have cataphoric reference to a noun phrase in the second clause; However I'm not sure whether GMAT tests this problem. [/quote][/quote]

How can 'D' be the answer ?
Isn't 'and & also' redundant in the option D.
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Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2016, 21:08
A. Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories about the peasant life
and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909 Selma Lagerlöf was the novelist who
became the first woman
and was also the first Swedish writer to win

-> Awkwardly, the phrasing makes the sentence sound like this: "the writer was the novelist who became the first woman (in history?)" as in "someone who transformed into a woman"... "and who also happened to win a Nobel prize". The separation between "first woman and first Swedish writer" becomes too marked with the redundant use of "was" for two times, in this particular context. We should immediately understand that we need to find an alternative in which we can find "the first woman and writer to win a Nobel prize" clearly enucleated and comprehensible. Therefore, A is incorrect.

B. She turned away from literary realism and wrote romantic stories about the
peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and novelist Selma Lagerlöf in
1909 became the first woman as well as the first Swedish writer that won

-> This phrasing makes the sentence look like it's talking about two distinct individuals ("One person wrote this, and another novelist did that"). Therefore, B is incorrect.

C. Selma Lagerlöf was a novelist who turned away from literary realism to write
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, and in
1909 she became the first woman in addition to the first Swedish writer winning

-> While kind of less awkward than choice A, choice C has the same exact problem: it doesn't solve the inherent ambiguity and won't clearly express the fact that the writer was the first woman (to win the Nobel Prize for Literature) and the first Swedish writer (to win the Nobel Prize for Literature). This could be read, again, as something like "she became the first woman; the first Swedish writer became the first woman as well". Furthermore, "winning" is unidiomatic in this particular context. Therefore, while possibly inviting, C is incorrect.


D. A novelist who turned away from literary realism to write romantic stories about
the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, Selma Lagerlöf became in
1909 the first woman and also the first Swedish writer to win


-> See here: both first woman and first Swedish writer are logically connected to "to win the Nobel prize". Try to rephrase it, if in doubt. You can only make it a "she became the first woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature" and "she also became the first Swedish writer to win the Nobel Prize in literature". D is correct.

E. As a novelist, Selma Lagerlöf turned away from literary realism and wrote
romantic stories about the peasant life and landscape of northern Sweden, in 1909
becoming the first woman and also the first Swedish writer that won

->Change in meaning! Do you remember the original phrase? It just says that "Selma Lagerlöf turned away", not that "being a novelist/ her status as a novelist" contributed. Strictly speaking, there is no established logical correlation between her status as a novelist and her desire to go from realism to romantic stories in the original phrase. Alternatively, I'd say this would be the kind of passage you'd find if the excerpt was talking about the writer's personal life up to the end of previous period and then started to analyze her history/characteristics as a novelist ("As a person, she was a good woman" -> "as a novelist, she turned away from literaly realism" in the current one. Choice D, nevertheless, is definitely more faithful to the original meaning and less verbose. We need to rule out E as well. Therefore, E is incorrect.
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Turning away from literary realism to write romantic stories   [#permalink] 10 Aug 2016, 21:08
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