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Two experimental garden plots were each planted with the

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Two experimental garden plots were each planted with the [#permalink] New post 24 May 2010, 11:50
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A
B
C
D
E

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83% (01:54) correct 17% (00:59) wrong based on 5 sessions
Two experimental garden plots were each planted with the same number of tomato plants. Magnesium salts were added to the first plot but not to the second. The first plot produced 20 pounds of tomatoes and the second plot produced 10 pounds. Since nothing else but water was added to either plot, the higher yields in the first plot must have been due to the magnesium salts.
Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

(A) A small amount of the magnesium salts from the first plot leached into the second plot.
(B) Tomato plants in a third experimental plot, to which a high-nitrogen fertilizer was added, but no magnesium salts, produced 15 pounds of tomatoes.
(C) Four different types of tomatoes were grown in equal proportions in each of the plots.
(D) Some weeds that compete with tomatoes cannot tolerate high amounts of magnesium salts in the soil.
(E) The two experimental plots differed from each other with respect to soil texture and exposure to sunlight.

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OA- E
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Re: Two experimental garden plots [#permalink] New post 24 May 2010, 14:45
I would pick E.
Actually I hesitated with D, but in fact I think that D actually support the conclusion.
With E we see that the soil texture and sunlight exposition were resposible for the higher yield.
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Re: Two experimental garden plots [#permalink] New post 26 May 2010, 11:51
My pick is E.

Argument says that Magnesium salt was the only thing that was different in both the plots.

E provides others reasons (soil texture and exposure to sunlight) were different in the two plots because which the tomato produce in plot would have been more than the produce in another plot.
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Re: Two experimental garden plots [#permalink] New post 28 May 2010, 02:34
nilesh376 wrote:
Two experimental garden plots were each planted with the same number of tomato plants. Magnesium salts were added to the first plot but not to the second. The first plot produced 20 pounds of tomatoes and the second plot produced 10 pounds. Since nothing else but water was added to either plot, the higher yields in the first plot must have been due to the magnesium salts.
Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

(A) A small amount of the magnesium salts from the first plot leached into the second plot.
(B) Tomato plants in a third experimental plot, to which a high-nitrogen fertilizer was added, but no magnesium salts, produced 15 pounds of tomatoes.
(C) Four different types of tomatoes were grown in equal proportions in each of the plots.
(D) Some weeds that compete with tomatoes cannot tolerate high amounts of magnesium salts in the soil.
(E) The two experimental plots differed from each other with respect to soil texture and exposure to sunlight.


A. Doesn't weaken the argument. It tries to confuse you making you think that if some salt leached then we would have similar results. But since a small amount leached it's not relevant enough.
B. Doesn't weaken the argument, just adds a different variable.
C. If they were grown in equal proportions then it strengthens the argument instead of weakening it.
D. It strengthens the argument: some weeds that compete with tomatoes died in the 1st plot while they may have grown in the second, affecting the yield of the second plot.
E. If true, it really weakens the argument, showing that we couldn't compare the two plots as equal, allowing other variables to play some effect on the yields.
Re: Two experimental garden plots   [#permalink] 28 May 2010, 02:34
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