Two measure standards R and S. 24 and 30 measured with R are : PS Archive
Check GMAT Club App Tracker for the Latest School Decision Releases http://gmatclub.com/AppTrack

It is currently 10 Dec 2016, 16:41
GMAT Club Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Two measure standards R and S. 24 and 30 measured with R are

  post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2004
Posts: 458
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 81 [0], given: 0

Two measure standards R and S. 24 and 30 measured with R are [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 16:02
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

This topic is locked. If you want to discuss this question please re-post it in the respective forum.

Two measure standards R and S. 24 and 30 measured with R are 42 and 60 when they are measured with S, respectively. If 100 is acquired with S, what would its value be measured with R?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Oct 2003
Posts: 102
Location: USA
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

simple but.. [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 17:24
One approach is a linear eqn: y = mx+c

Given two points (24, 42) and (30,60) on the line, find the x coordinate of third point (x, 100)

Last edited by mantha on 25 Jan 2005, 21:41, edited 1 time in total.
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 1440
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 36 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 17:43
Not able to find any correlation between the numbers....wud have picked a number close to 42 or 44, from the ans choices. :?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Oct 2003
Posts: 102
Location: USA
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

other approaches [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 18:10
R a multiple of 6 and S a multiple of 10.

In answer choices is there a multiple of six? If yes, then pick that.

I exhausted my 75 min on this question alone:-)
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2004
Posts: 559
Location: SF Bay Area, USA
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 190 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 18:21
Question is not very clear. But, let me attempt:

I don't think there is a single answer - there are infinite number of solutions.

Well, depending on the choices we can pick one.
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 2243
Followers: 16

Kudos [?]: 320 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 21:09
S=a+bR
42=a+b*24
60=a+b*30

=>b=3
a=-30

100=-30+3R
R=130/3
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 2243
Followers: 16

Kudos [?]: 320 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 21:16
A short cut of solving this if you are given a set of choices to choose from

R 24 30
S 42 60
S-R 18 30
Notice 100 is about the same distance to 60 as 18.
You can conjuncture that R is about 30+(30-18)=42, which is very close to 130/3=43.3
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Posts: 1493
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 96 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2005, 21:37
R => 24 30 change 6
S => 42 60 change 18
S => 60 100 change 40

R = 30+40*6/18= 43.3
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 26 Jan 2005
Posts: 11
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jan 2005, 06:34
Lemme help you comprehend the question..

There are 2 standards R and S.
If standard R is applied, 24 and 30 give 42 as result.
If standard S is applied, 24 and 30 give 60 as the result.
Now if for some values, we get 100 on application of S.. what would we get if we apply standard R on the same values?

Now any comments?
  [#permalink] 26 Jan 2005, 06:34
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Two measure standards R and S. 24 and 30 measured with R are

  post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.