Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 23 Sep 2014, 06:55

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Nov 2004
Posts: 294
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 02:43
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 2 sessions
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(A) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(B) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, which they admit they lack, many people are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(C) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, analytical skills bring out a disinclination in many people to recognize that they are weak to a degree.
(D) Many people, willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills, are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(E) Many people have a disinclination to recognize the weakness of their analytical skills while willing to admit their lack of computer skills or other technical skills.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 03 Nov 2004
Posts: 870
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 04:35
I will go with D
A & B can be eliminated for wrong comparisons
C is wordy - analytical skills bring out a disinclination..........
E - lack is used as a noun rather than as a verb. I think this is similar to a question in OG something to do with 'lack of math skills'
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5097
Location: Singapore
Followers: 19

Kudos [?]: 145 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 04:46
(A), (B), and (C) -> Bad comparison.

Between D and E, I'll take D. (E) looks alright to me, but I'll go for the more concise of the two, and take (D)
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - weakness [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 10:10
sonaketu wrote:
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(A) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(B) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, which they admit they lack, many people are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(C) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, analytical skills bring out a disinclination in many people to recognize that they are weak to a degree.
(D) Many people, willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills, are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(E) Many people have a disinclination to recognize the weakness of their analytical skills while willing to admit their lack of computer skills or other technical skills.


A, C eliminate for obvious reasons.

Question to those who eliminated AC B: Can you not have an "appositive" between the the comparison phrase and the noun?

Appositive = which they admit they lack. This DC "adds" more meaning to the noun skills.

D: is passive.

E: Changes meaning. The author doesnt intend to mean people are disinclined to recognize their weak analytical skills "while willing" to admit their lack of.....This makes it sounds like both events are happening at the "same" time. But the author doesnt want to convey this.

Could someone confirm whether you cant have an appositive between Phrase, <apppositive>, Noun [valid comparison for the noun]. Or do the comparison phrase/noun ABOSOLUTELY have to be next to each other or can it have an appositive like it does here.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Mar 2005
Posts: 93
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 17:07
Interesting.

1. Upon first reading I really didnt notice anything wrong with the sentence.

2. Onto the Answers.

(a) keep A for now.
(b) "which they admit they lack" ---> who is they? Eliminate
(c) comparison is more straight forward in this sentence but the phrase "skills bring out a disinclination in many " = awkward construction
(d) I like D. But again. Comparing lack of skills to weak skills... still a consideration
(e) use of have vs willing. Also comparing weak skills to a complete lack of skills. --> wrong

I have it between A and D.

Choose A.
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jun 2004
Posts: 1128
Location: London, UK
Schools: Tuck'08
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 17:27
For me it's between D and E

tkirk32, I think A is not correct because with UNLIKE you can not compare "computer skills" with "there is a disinclination".

Between D and E, I would go for D.

I dont like the begining of the sentence in E and the use of "while", I found D better.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 854
Location: Hyderabad
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - weakness [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 18:17
sonaketu wrote:
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(A) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(B) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, which they admit they lack, many people are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(C) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, analytical skills bring out a disinclination in many people to recognize that they are weak to a degree.
(D) Many people, willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills, are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(E) Many people have a disinclination to recognize the weakness of their analytical skills while willing to admit their lack of computer skills or other technical skills.


The portion in RED is an adverbial clause acting as a modifier, modifying "Many people"

D it is
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Apr 2005
Posts: 167
Location: Atlanta , GA
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - weakness [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 18:21
gmataquaguy wrote:
sonaketu wrote:
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(A) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(B) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, which they admit they lack, many people are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(C) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, analytical skills bring out a disinclination in many people to recognize that they are weak to a degree.
(D) Many people, willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills, are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(E) Many people have a disinclination to recognize the weakness of their analytical skills while willing to admit their lack of computer skills or other technical skills.


A, C eliminate for obvious reasons.

Question to those who eliminated AC B: Can you not have an "appositive" between the the comparison phrase and the noun?

Appositive = which they admit they lack. This DC "adds" more meaning to the noun skills.

D: is passive.

E: Changes meaning. The author doesnt intend to mean people are disinclined to recognize their weak analytical skills "while willing" to admit their lack of.....This makes it sounds like both events are happening at the "same" time. But the author doesnt want to convey this.

Could someone confirm whether you cant have an appositive between Phrase, <apppositive>, Noun [valid comparison for the noun]. Or do the comparison phrase/noun ABOSOLUTELY have to be next to each other or can it have an appositive like it does here.


will go with E ,

because " While " makes up for "Unlike" in the problem statement.

If I am not wrong the problem statement says that at the same time some people agree to lack technical skill but if you tell they lack analytical skills they won't agree . so events are happening at the same time.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 854
Location: Hyderabad
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 18:42
IMO

While is best used at the beginning of a sentence to introduce a subordinate clause
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 29 Jan 2005
Posts: 5252
Followers: 23

Kudos [?]: 133 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User Reviews Badge
 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 18:50
D is most parallel with the wording of willing to....disinclined to....
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 854
Location: Hyderabad
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 18:55
Finally found a better rule to refute E:

"Two-part sentences of which the second member is introduced by as (in the sense of because), for, or, nor, and while (in the sense of and at the same time) likewise require a comma before the conjunction"
--William Strunk
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Nov 2004
Posts: 294
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 20:26
Thanks for the discussion. Though I had picked D, I was't sure how to refute E.
OA is indeed D.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Mar 2005
Posts: 93
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 12 May 2005, 20:49
Antmavel wrote:
For me it's between D and E

tkirk32, I think A is not correct because with UNLIKE you can not compare "computer skills" with "there is a disinclination".

Between D and E, I would go for D.

I dont like the begining of the sentence in E and the use of "while", I found D better.


I see. thanks for the correction. x is like y. unlike x, y. It seems that X and Y both have to two things that can be compared.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - weakness [#permalink] New post 14 May 2005, 14:02
gmataquaguy wrote:
sonaketu wrote:
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(A) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(B) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, which they admit they lack, many people are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(C) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, analytical skills bring out a disinclination in many people to recognize that they are weak to a degree.
(D) Many people, willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills, are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(E) Many people have a disinclination to recognize the weakness of their analytical skills while willing to admit their lack of computer skills or other technical skills.


A, C eliminate for obvious reasons.

Question to those who eliminated AC B: Can you not have an "appositive" between the the comparison phrase and the noun?

Appositive = which they admit they lack. This DC "adds" more meaning to the noun skills.

D: is passive.

E: Changes meaning. The author doesnt intend to mean people are disinclined to recognize their weak analytical skills "while willing" to admit their lack of.....This makes it sounds like both events are happening at the "same" time. But the author doesnt want to convey this.

Could someone confirm whether you cant have an appositive between Phrase, <apppositive>, Noun [valid comparison for the noun]. Or do the comparison phrase/noun ABOSOLUTELY have to be next to each other or can it have an appositive like it does here.


Could someone confirm [and if not atleast negate] the aforementioned?

Is the following statement wrong?

Unlike computer skills, which people admit they lack, analytical skills.......?

I dont think it is. I guess my question is can you have an appositive between the nouns being compared or maybe a non-restrictive clause between the nouns being compared?

Or is it an absolute must that the nouns being compared have to be next to each other?

For example:

Unlike analytical skills, people skills ----> Correct.
Unlike analytical skills, which can never be taught, people skills ---> Incorrect or correct?
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 854
Location: Hyderabad
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - weakness [#permalink] New post 14 May 2005, 14:31
gmataquaguy wrote:
gmataquaguy wrote:
sonaketu wrote:
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(A) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(B) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, which they admit they lack, many people are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(C) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, analytical skills bring out a disinclination in many people to recognize that they are weak to a degree.
(D) Many people, willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills, are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(E) Many people have a disinclination to recognize the weakness of their analytical skills while willing to admit their lack of computer skills or other technical skills.


A, C eliminate for obvious reasons.

Question to those who eliminated AC B: Can you not have an "appositive" between the the comparison phrase and the noun?

Appositive = which they admit they lack. This DC "adds" more meaning to the noun skills.

D: is passive.

E: Changes meaning. The author doesnt intend to mean people are disinclined to recognize their weak analytical skills "while willing" to admit their lack of.....This makes it sounds like both events are happening at the "same" time. But the author doesnt want to convey this.

Could someone confirm whether you cant have an appositive between Phrase, <apppositive>, Noun [valid comparison for the noun]. Or do the comparison phrase/noun ABOSOLUTELY have to be next to each other or can it have an appositive like it does here.


Could someone confirm [and if not atleast negate] the aforementioned?

Is the following statement wrong?

Unlike computer skills, which people admit they lack, analytical skills.......?

I dont think it is. I guess my question is can you have an appositive between the nouns being compared or maybe a non-restrictive clause between the nouns being compared?

Or is it an absolute must that the nouns being compared have to be next to each other?

For example:

Unlike analytical skills, people skills ----> Correct.
Unlike analytical skills, which can never be taught, people skills ---> Incorrect or correct?


IMO: there is no problem if we have a non-restrictive clause/appositive between the nouns being compared.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2005, 14:29
Thanks Vithal. I was thinking the same thing too.

Could someone else please verify whether our train of thought is okay?

Last edited by gmataquaguy on 30 May 2005, 11:47, edited 1 time in total.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2005, 11:47
Paul/SuperCat and other SC Gods, could you please confirm whether the aforementioned concept is accurate or not. I think it is but the stamp of approval from ya'll would be nice. :-)
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
avatar
Joined: 15 Dec 2003
Posts: 4318
Followers: 22

Kudos [?]: 163 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2005, 13:21
It is fine to have an appositive or rest/non-rest. clause between two nouns being compared. However, B's problem rests upon the erroneous use of multiple pronouns and misplaced modifier.

First B's non-restrictive clause "which they admit they lack" is using pronoun "they" repeatedly and it is just wordy. A simpler way of saying it would have been "which they admit lacking". Second, obviously, people are wrongly compared to skills.

In your given sentence:
Quote:
Unlike computer skills, which people admit they lack, analytical skills.......?

In red is a non-restr. clause, not an appositive. Although it is fine in terms of noun comparison, the non-restr. clause itself is wrong because it use pronoun "they" when it could have been re-written as follows: "which people admit lacking". I strongly believe that an economical use of words is crucial in the GMAT.

E is wrong because of idiomatic use. It is preferable to say that "you are disinclined to X" than "you have a disinclination to X". Once again, conciseness is preferred in D.

C has the same idiomatic usage problem. "to bring out the disinclination in many people" sounds very awkward.

I got D on this one although my hesitation was between C and D.
_________________

Best Regards,

Paul

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - weakness [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2005, 06:48
Vithal wrote:
sonaketu wrote:
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(A) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a disinclination on the part of many people to recognize the degree to which their analytical skills are weak.
(B) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, which they admit they lack, many people are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(C) Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, analytical skills bring out a disinclination in many people to recognize that they are weak to a degree.
(D) Many people, willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills, are disinclined to recognize that their analytical skills are weak.
(E) Many people have a disinclination to recognize the weakness of their analytical skills while willing to admit their lack of computer skills or other technical skills.


The portion in RED is an adverbial clause acting as a modifier, modifying "Many people"

D it is


Vithal how is the portion in RED an adverbial clause.

Are you saying for the statement "willing to admit that they lack computer skills or other technical skills":

Subject = They
verb = lack.
Willing = participle that describes the subject "People"?
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2005, 06:48
Sonaketu, what is the OA? Is it D?? I think C is wrong for 2 reasons:

C, is passive in nature. Switches the subject and object.
C, also makes it sound like "People are weak".
  [#permalink] 04 Jun 2005, 06:48
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, raiprem123 0 17 Aug 2013, 12:42
Unlike musical talent or other creative skills, there is a rohansherry 5 09 Aug 2009, 13:39
30 Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a vivektripathi 26 30 Dec 2008, 06:58
Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a vscid 1 22 Feb 2008, 04:02
1 Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a gablaze23 4 05 Jul 2007, 16:42
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Unlike computer skills or other technical skills, there is a

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 22 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.