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Unlike most warbler species, the male and female blue-winged

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Unlike most warbler species, the male and female blue-winged [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2003, 09:01
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

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0% (00:00) correct 100% (00:31) wrong based on 1 sessions
Unlike most warbler species, the male and female
blue-winged warbler are very difficult to tell apart.

(A) Unlike most warbler species, the male and
female blue-winged warbler are very difficult
to tell apart.
(B) Unlike most warbler species, the gender of the
blue-winged warbler is very difficult to
distinguish.
(C) Unlike those in most warbler species, the male
and female blue-winged warblers are very
difficult to distinguish.
(D) It is very difficult, unlike in most warbler species,
to tell the male and female blue-winged warbler
apart.
(E) Blue-winged warblers are unlike most species of
warbler in that it is very difficult to tell the
male and female apart
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2003, 09:44
i would say C:

A: out b/c it compares warbler species to male and female blue-winged warblers

B: out b/c it twists the sentence, the sentence does not say anything about the distinguishing the gender...only that male and female are difficult to tell apart


E:out b/c it is not the most direct way (passive)...C is more direct therefore better.

D:same reasoning as E...although D&E do not have any major problems....i think the key to this sentence is to notice that we want to make it clear that we are comparing the male and female of other warbler species with the male and female of blue-winged warblers....so, eliminate anything that does not make this CRYSTAL CLEAR.....
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2003, 09:55
E does not employ a passive voice construction and is pretty concise. I vote for E.

Last edited by stolyar on 02 Oct 2003, 23:15, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2003, 20:05
E is correct.
Can anyone please educate me on active/passive voices. Where do we use them. Why are passive voices incorrect in some sentences.
praet/stolyar can u help on this...?
thanks.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2003, 20:35
wow, good job MartinMag and stolyar....now that i look closer, i don't really know why i choose C over D&E....as i mentioned i had a tough time eliminating D and especially E.....i think i was just too convinced that C had to be the answer and forced myself to eliminate E even though it sounded perfectly fine....i however still learned something though, DO NOT be swayed by an answer choice you think is correct....make sure you give the other choices an equal chance....thanks for the lessen guys....
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2003, 20:50
Vicky wrote:
E is correct.
Can anyone please educate me on active/passive voices. Where do we use them. Why are passive voices incorrect in some sentences.
praet/stolyar can u help on this...?
thanks.


I dont think this is about active/passive voice at all

"Apples to Apples " construct is necessary.

Compare male and female blue winged warblers to others.

C uses a faulty construct

1. We cant use distinguish in that way...its always distinguish between x and y..

2.Unlike THOSE in most warbler species, the male and female blue winged warblers....PROVE it to yourself that this is a good comparison.

See the problem yet..ok..heres a modified version

Unlike those in most warbler species, the males and females in the blue winged warbler species are very difficult to distinguish.

OR

Unlike those of most warbler species, the males and females of the blue winged warblers are...


good enough?

thanks
praetorian
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2003, 02:02
thanks it's clear.
But my previous question still holds. In which sentences/places it is wrong to use passive voice ?
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2003, 03:58
Vicky,
You may find some reference on this in Kaplan's verbal workbook or such. The point is that in most cases we should avoid passive voice, meaning that there might be some constructions in which we would have nothing to do but use passive voice. I assume those cases are rare. But in general active voice is preferred. The same applies to being. Some sources claim that constructions employing being are as a rule incorrect, but there are exceptions.

Well, I'm sure Praetorian will tell you more on this... :P
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jan 2004, 18:55
(E) Blue-winged warblers are unlike most species of warbler in that it is very difficult to tell the male and female apart

Does not "E" incorrectly compares warblers with species.
Other than passive, what else is wrong in C?
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jan 2004, 19:04
BTW, in that = in [reference to the fact] that
"because", and "in that", introduces factual clauses.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2004, 19:41
C is incorrect because it does not specify what are the 2 entities it is trying to distinguish. To put in in my own words:

"X and Y are difficult to distinguish" (from what? - there is nothing here that states that) "X is difficult to distinguish from Y" or "It is difficult to distinguish between X and Y".
  [#permalink] 28 Jan 2004, 19:41
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