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Usage of "of Which"

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Usage of "of Which" [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2011, 23:06
This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

(A) of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
(B) of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
(C) of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
(D) to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
(E) to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.

Explanation says that "of which" in option A and B do not clearly refer to any antecedent.

Experts please explain why "of which" in options A and B is not referring to "15 new townships" ? "of which" is placed adjacent to "15 new townships" in both options A and B.
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Re: Usage of "of Which" [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2011, 10:41
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sungoal wrote:
I am sorry for the mistake. The original source has the comma. Below is the correct question:

This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships, of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

(A) of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
(B) of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
(C) of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
(D) to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
(E) to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.


Could you why "of which" in options A and B is not referring to "townships"? The original explanation says that "of which" has not clear antecedent.
What's the original answer?

To me, it looks like the answer should be (A). If the comma were a semi-colon, then (C), (D), or (E) might be up for consideration, but a comma cannot link two clauses without a conjunction. With a comma, only (A) and (B) avoid the trap of being a run-on sentence
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Re: Usage of "of Which" [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2011, 10:16
Expert's post
sungoal wrote:
This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships: of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

(A) of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
(B) of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
(C) of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
(D) to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
(E) to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.

Explanation says that "of which" in option A and B do not clearly refer to any antecedent.

Experts please explain why "of which" in options A and B is not referring to "15 new townships" ? "of which" is placed adjacent to "15 new townships" in both options A and B.

Hi sungoal,

Can you double-check that this is copied properly from the original source? The GMAT rarely tests the proper use of the colon, and none of the answer choices seem correct following a colon regardless. Should this have had a semi-colon or comma instead?
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Re: Usage of "of Which" [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2011, 10:25
I am sorry for the mistake. The original source has the comma. Below is the correct question:

This process resulted in a total of 15 new townships, of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.

(A) of which, to date, 7 are still in existence.
(B) of which number, 7 of the 15 are still, to date, in existence.
(C) of the number 15, 7, to date, are still in existence.
(D) to date of these 15, 7 are still in existence.
(E) to date, 7 of the 15 are still in existence.


Could you why "of which" in options A and B is not referring to "townships"? The original explanation says that "of which" has not clear antecedent.
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Re: Usage of "of Which" [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2011, 10:49
The question is from GMATClub Test.

I think there is a printing mistake in the question. The answer according to the explanation is E.

So I think, as you said, it should be semicolon in the question.

Could you explain, why without semicolon options C, D and E are run on sentences?
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Re: Usage of "of Which" [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2011, 18:09
Expert's post
A "clause" is a Noun-Verb pair that conveys a complete idea. In a properly constructed sentence, clauses must be connected to one another; the general rule is that a sentence with N clauses must have (N - 1) connecting words (a semi-colon functions as a connecting word for this purpose.

(C), (D), and (E) all connect the two noun-verb pairs "process resulted" and "7 are" with only a comma, and no connecting word (such as But, Although, or And). Thus, the last three choices all appear to be run-on sentences.
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Re: Usage of "of Which" [#permalink] New post 23 May 2014, 04:59
I have a minor doubt regarding the usage of WHICH, other that the discussion above.

Below are 3 sentences, can you please tell me which of the usage(s) is/are correct?

1. I have books, which are red.
2. I have books which are red.
3. I have books, of which 3 are red
4. I have books of which 3 are red.

Thanks already.
Re: Usage of "of Which"   [#permalink] 23 May 2014, 04:59
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