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V06 #31

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V06 #31 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 10:46
Most people who betray their country through some form of espionage are driven by irrational desires to feel powerful or important, to seek revenge, or even to take risks. If these people were thinking rationally, they would not be involved in such self-destructive behavior.

The argument above rests on which of the following assumptions?

(a) Self-destruction is the most frequent result of espionage.
(b) The desire to feel powerful is always irrational.
(c) Those involved in espionage do not have rational reasons for their behavior.
(d) Espionage is rarely a successful way to gain revenge.
(e) Risk-taking is a less frequent motivation for espionage than the desire to feel important.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA: C


doesn't "most people" actually acknowledges that there are people with other reasons that might be rational?
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Re: V06 #31 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 11:34
ah64captain wrote:
Most people who betray their country through some form of espionage are driven by irrational desires to feel powerful or important, to seek revenge, or even to take risks. If these people were thinking rationally, they would not be involved in such self-destructive behavior.

The argument above rests on which of the following assumptions?

(a) Self-destruction is the most frequent result of espionage.
(b) The desire to feel powerful is always irrational.
(c) Those involved in espionage do not have rational reasons for their behavior.
(d) Espionage is rarely a successful way to gain revenge.
(e) Risk-taking is a less frequent motivation for espionage than the desire to feel important.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA: C


doesn't "most people" actually acknowledges that there are people with other reasons that might be rational?


Let me try..Negating an assumption should lead to the answer.

a) Self destruction is not the most frequent result ... Negating a) does not affect the argument ,perhaps not too related to the argument at hand.
b) The desire to feel powerful is not always irrational. Negating b) still supports our conclusion - such desires are irrational at least some of the time.
c) Those who involve in espionage have rational reasons for their behavior. Negating c) does the trick - If c) weren't assumed, the premise of the argument falls apart.
d) Espionage is often a successful way to gain revenge. Negating d) supports the argument, so we can rule this one out.
e) This one is simple - it supports our argument, so we can rule this one out.

what do you think?
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Re: V06 #31 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 12:05
intresting method, never tried it..
although not sure about Negating d) Espionage is often a successful way to gain revenge - would imply it's not self destructive thus making the argument less persuading
but C totally standout with this technique
thanx
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Re: V06 #31 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 12:28
ah64captain wrote:
intresting method, never tried it..
although not sure about Negating d) Espionage is often a successful way to gain revenge - would imply it's not self destructive thus making the argument less persuading
thanx


Nope, not correct. The act of espionage is what's self destructive. Success or failure is besides the point.

Yes, the method of negating the statement is a way of emphasizing its importance or the lack of it.
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Re: V06 #31 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2011, 14:57
Most people who betray their country through some form of espionage are driven by irrational desires to feel powerful or important, to seek revenge, or even to take risks. If these people were thinking rationally, they would not be involved in such self-destructive behavior.

The argument above rests on which of the following assumptions?

(a) Self-destruction is the most frequent result of espionage. - My answer(explanatrion below)
(b) The desire to feel powerful is always irrational. - Clearly mentioned in the passage(driven by irrational desire to feel powerful or important---> so to feel powerful is irrational although, the argument doesn't mention if this is true always)
(c) Those involved in espionage do not have rational reasons for their behavior. - By using "most people" the argument clears that there are some(at least 1) who betray for rational reason.

Argument says:
1) Most ppl(chose espionage) ____driven by______--> irrational desire(e.g. feel powerful, important, revenge etc)
2) If ppl(think rational)__________then__________--> No self destruction

Option A says:
3) Espionage _______most probably________-->Self destruction.

combine 1) with 3)
irrational desire ---> self destruction hence 2)

Option d) & e) are irrelevant.
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" Some are desperate for success, and therefore destined for it."

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Re: V06 #31 [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2011, 22:52
ah64captain wrote:
Most people who betray their country through some form of espionage are driven by irrational desires to feel powerful or important, to seek revenge, or even to take risks. If these people were thinking rationally, they would not be involved in such self-destructive behavior.

The argument above rests on which of the following assumptions?

(a) Self-destruction is the most frequent result of espionage.
(b) The desire to feel powerful is always irrational.
(c) Those involved in espionage do not have rational reasons for their behavior.
(d) Espionage is rarely a successful way to gain revenge.
(e) Risk-taking is a less frequent motivation for espionage than the desire to feel important.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA: C


doesn't "most people" actually acknowledges that there are people with other reasons that might be rational?

a- this is not is the discussion
b- ws tempted but the always send of alarm bells
c-negation works on destroying the argument-correct
d/e- irrelevant
Re: V06 #31   [#permalink] 04 Dec 2011, 22:52
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