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Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy

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Manager
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Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy [#permalink] New post 08 May 2013, 17:46
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  15% (low)

Question Stats:

70% (01:27) correct 29% (00:41) wrong based on 57 sessions
Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy canopy and saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs hang like socks on a clothesline.

(A) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs hang
(B) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs were hanging
(C) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, with arms and legs hanging
(D) seen monkeys sleeping on the branches, with arms and legs hanging
(E) seen monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs have hung

I have two doubts in this question:
1) According to the OE, "whose" modifies "branches". However, in other official questions I have seen that sometimes the clause modifier doesn't modify the closest noun. Actually, it can modify the main noun in a noun phrase as long as it makes sense and it is not ambiguous.
In this case, we have "monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose..."; "monkeys" is the main noun of that noun phrase and makes sense with "arms and legs hang like socks on a clothesline".
So, my question is: Is the split "whose....", a good reason to eliminate some choices?

2) What are the rules related to a prepositional phrase after a comma? In this question: "..., with arms and legs hanging". How could we know that the prepositional phrase refers to the monkeys and not the visitors. Because these modifiers modify the entire clause, usually modifies the subject (visitors).

Thanks!
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Joined: 29 Mar 2010
Posts: 141
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, International Business
GMAT 1: 590 Q28 V38
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WE: Accounting (Hospitality and Tourism)
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Kudos [?]: 22 [0], given: 12

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Re: Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy can [#permalink] New post 08 May 2013, 21:03
danzig wrote:
Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy canopy and saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs hang like socks on a clothesline.

(A) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs hang
(B) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs were hanging
(C) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, with arms and legs hanging
(D) seen monkeys sleeping on the branches, with arms and legs hanging
(E) seen monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs have hung

I have two doubts in this question:
1) According to the OE, "whose" modifies "branches". However, in other official questions I have seen that sometimes the clause modifier doesn't modify the closest noun. Actually, it can modify the main noun in a noun phrase as long as it makes sense and it is not ambiguous.
In this case, we have "monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose..."; "monkeys" is the main noun of that noun phrase and makes sense with "arms and legs hang like socks on a clothesline".
So, my question is: Is the split "whose....", a good reason to eliminate some choices?

2) What are the rules related to a prepositional phrase after a comma? In this question: "..., with arms and legs hanging". How could we know that the prepositional phrase refers to the monkeys and not the visitors. Because these modifiers modify the entire clause, usually modifies the subject (visitors).

Thanks!


On the GMAT I think whose can only refer to people, and not animals. Saw can be eliminated because it causes a conflict in tense. Basically if the visitors saw a monkey the next set of customers may not see the same monkeys hanging on trees. And the action is ongoing because the continually have people coming and noticing the same as the last group.

So A, B, and E can be eliminated because whose is not referring to a person. A, B and C can be eliminated because it
changes the meaning of the sentence in terms of tenses.

D is only one left
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Re: Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy can [#permalink] New post 08 May 2013, 22:31
Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy canopy and saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs hang like socks on a clothesline.

(A) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs hang
Whose cannot modify animals
(B) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs were hanging
Whose cannot modify animals
(C) saw monkeys sleeping on the branches, with arms and legs hanging
saw is not the right tense used because the tense should be parallel to have often looked up
(D) seen monkeys sleeping on the branches, with arms and legs hanging
Correct
(E) seen monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose arms and legs have hung
Whose cannot modify animals

Now regarding your doubts:

1) According to the OE, "whose" modifies "branches". However, in other official questions I have seen that sometimes the clause modifier doesn't modify the closest noun. Actually, it can modify the main noun in a noun phrase as long as it makes sense and it is not ambiguous.
In this case, we have "monkeys sleeping on the branches, whose..."; "monkeys" is the main noun of that noun phrase and makes sense with "arms and legs hang like socks on a clothesline".
So, my question is: Is the split "whose....", a good reason to eliminate some choices?
The answer choice containing whose can simply be eliminated, because on the GMAT, whose can only modify people and here it seems to modify monkeys.

2) What are the rules related to a prepositional phrase after a comma? In this question: "..., with arms and legs hanging". How could we know that the prepositional phrase refers to the monkeys and not the visitors. Because these modifiers modify the entire clause, usually modifies the subject (visitors).
normally a prepositional phrase can be placed anywhere, but generally it is placed closest to the noun being modified, in this case the monkeys.
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Re: Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy can [#permalink] New post 09 May 2013, 08:05
Expert's post
My first point is that we should not confuse the use of ‘who’ with ‘whose’. ‘Who’ can be only used for humans, while 'whose' can be used universally for humans, non-humans, and even inanimate things.

Ex: Tom is the student who is the topper in GMAT - right , because student is a human
Tom is the student, which is the topper in GMAT - wrong because,’ which’ cannot denote humans
Tom grows a couple of cows, who yield two litres of milk – wrong because who cannot denote cows.
Tom grows a couple of cows, which yield two litres of milk – correct
Tom is the student, whose marks are the highest in the GMAT – right
Tom has half dozen pens, whose total is price is $5 – right again, though pen is a not a man.
Tom grows a couple of cows, whose total yield per day is two liters of milk. – Perfectly correct, even though cows are not humans.

All of the uses of 'whose' are correct because there is no other word to denote the possessive form of these pronouns. Actually the possessive pronoun of ‘who’, and ‘which’ is only ‘whose’.

Second, in this case, we have to ignore - saw monkeys -; because of //ism A, B and C are out in the dump.
Read with have, the past participle ‘seen’, is quite //. Now comes the play of logic in this modification by the prepositional phrase. Mechanically we cannot conclude that all the eligible nouns are vying to be modified equally; For example, a visitor is a visitor who has come to enjoy some place. He has not come to sleep on the branches. Nor do branches have arms and legs hanging like socks. So it can be only monkeys. This logical perception is vital for solving the contemporary pattern of question in the GMAT.
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Re: Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy can [#permalink] New post 09 May 2013, 08:47
danzig wrote:
1) According to the OE, "whose" modifies "branches". However, in other official questions I have seen that sometimes the clause modifier doesn't modify the closest noun. Actually, it can modify the main noun in a noun phrase as long as it makes sense and it is not ambiguous.


Can you cite any official example where a relative pronoun (such as "whose" in this case) used as a non-essential modifier (basically delimited by commas) modifies anything other than the nearest eligible noun.

Would be interesting to see such example.
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Re: Visitors to the park have often looked up into the leafy can   [#permalink] 09 May 2013, 08:47
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