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Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the

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Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 06:57
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

40% (01:50) correct 60% (00:52) wrong based on 124 sessions
Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the enormous sculpture The Gates of Hell and saw figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths gape like black holes in the universe.

(A) saw figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths gape
(B) saw figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths were gaping
(C) saw figures clawing at the gates, with eyes and mouths gaping
(D) seen figures who claw at the gates, their eyes and mouths gaping
(E) seen figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths have gaped
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by gmatter0913 on 19 Aug 2013, 09:15, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 08:45
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Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the enormous sculpture The Gates of Hell and saw figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths gape like black holes in the universe.

(A) saw figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths gape
(B) saw figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths were gaping
(C) saw figures clawing at the gates, with eyes and mouths gaping
(D) seen figures who claw at the gates, their eyes and mouths gaping
(E) seen figures clawing at the gates, whose eyes and mouths have gaped

In E, whose is ambiguous, it can refer to both gates and figures as IMO whose can refer to both things and people.

In D, the pronoun WHO makes it clear that its "the figures clawing at the gates" who have their eyes and mouths gaping, their is a personal pronoun , it refers to a particular person/thing

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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 09:21
I chose E wrongly for the below reasons:

1. "figures clawing at the gates" (verb-ing without comma) obviously modifies "figures".
2. "whose eyes and mouths have gaped" modifies "figures" because gates cannot have eyes and mouths.
3. Moreover, the only other possible option D has pronoun ambiguity. it is not clear if "their" is referring to "visitors" or "figures"...

Last edited by gmatter0913 on 21 Aug 2013, 02:46, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 10:22
mnm21234 wrote:
In E, whose is ambiguous, it can refer to both gates and figures as IMO whose can refer to both things and people.




In option E, whosecertainly refers to gates.
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 11:29
Yes, I understand that "whose" can refer to things and people.

But, on the GMAT, we many times (especially in cases of pronoun as it is not an absolute rule) check if the antecedent makes sense or not. There are many official examples where it is said as "as A an antecedent doesn't make sense, it is B that the pronoun is referring to...)

So, I thought as "gates" cannot have eyes and mouths, it has to modify "figures".
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 18:52
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gmatter0913 wrote:
Yes, I understand that "whose" can refer to things and people.

But, on the GMAT, we many times (especially in cases of pronoun as it is not an absolute rule) check if the antecedent makes sense or not. There are many official examples where it is said as "as A an antecedent doesn't make sense, it is B that the pronoun is referring to...)

So, I thought as "gates" cannot have eyes and mouths, it has to modify "figures".


HI gmatter

Technically, modifier should provide a CLOSEST noun. So to tackle modifier problem, we should follow "touch" rule first. In this question, even though gates do not have eyes, the present of a middle man - gates - makes a sentence's meaning ambiguous.

As you said: we have to check the antecedent to make sure it makes sense. Yes, you're correct. But before that the sentence's grammar must be correct first.

Hope it's clear.

Similar question to practice:
visitors-to-the-park-have-often-looked-up-into-the-leafy-10435.html
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 22:49
Can someone explain seen vs saw?
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 23:04
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animanga008 wrote:
Can someone explain seen vs saw?


Hi animanga

"seen" is correct to make a sentence parallel. Let see the non-underlined part

Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the enormous sculpture The Gates of Hell and seen figures clawing at the gates............

"and" is parallel marker ==> have examined || and (have) seen. (present perfect tense)

If you use "saw", you mean simple past tense --> The sentence is not parallel.

Hope it's clear.
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 23:08
Ah, I see. Parallelism. Thanks for the feedback.
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2013, 19:11
Isn't the usage of "their" in option D a spot of concern? I thought it is definitely not clear if "their" is referring to "visitors" or "figures".

Also, can somebody point me to some good articles on "they" and "them".

Because all I know about "they" and "them" is that they are gender-neutral and strictly plural pronouns. But, it looks like I need to understand them more carefully, especially their usage in long sentences.
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2013, 07:28
Could somebody help me on the above query, please?
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Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the [#permalink] New post 23 Aug 2013, 15:29
I chose E because I was under the impression that the relative pronoun "who" can only modify people. While reading the sentence, I wasn't sure if "the figures" were people or sculptures. Is this poor reasoning? Can we assume that these "figures" are people because they're being described as "clawing", an action word?
Re: Visitors to the Rodin Museum have often examined the   [#permalink] 23 Aug 2013, 15:29
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