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We live in a world in which crime is rampant, children are

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New post 10 Apr 2005, 17:52
gmataquaguy wrote:
Paul,
I agree with your explanation but Could you elaborate on "all prepositions apply to "in which" so there is no need to repeat it."

When you say "prepositions" I'm guessing you are referring to the subordinate clauses [in which] children are recalcitrant, [in which ---> this is implicit] change is the only constant.

Is my explanation correct? Could you tell me if the aforementioned explanation where i "break down" the sentence is accurate.

What I mean is that you will not say:
A house across the Hilton valley, across the Hampstead ravine and across the Zolt mountains.
Instead, you would say: A house across the Hilton valley, the Hampstead ravine and the Zolt mountains. --> This will avoid you repeating unnecessarily the preposition "across" in the enumeration.

However, in this above example, we are talking about a relative pronoun "in which" which introduces a series of subordinate clauses(thanks for correcting me on this gmataquaguy) so it may be fair that we repeat the relative pronoun "in which" so that it links each and every dependent clauses to the independent clause. I would have to concur with Praveen's explanation because, I think, if we omit the relative pronoun, what is being enumerated after the first element "children are recalcitrant" could be considered ind. clauses in and of themselves and hence become run-on stentences.

This is something I admit is a very obscure rule that I cannot confirm with 100% certainty... 8-)
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New post 13 Apr 2005, 17:56
Paul wrote:

What I mean is that you will not say:
A house across the Hilton valley, across the Hampstead ravine and across the Zolt mountains.
Instead, you would say: A house across the Hilton valley, the Hampstead ravine and the Zolt mountains. --> This will avoid you repeating unnecessarily the preposition "across" in the enumeration.

However, in this above example, we are talking about a relative pronoun "in which" which introduces a series of subordinate clauses(thanks for correcting me on this gmataquaguy) so it may be fair that we repeat the relative pronoun "in which" so that it links each and every dependent clauses to the independent clause. I would have to concur with Praveen's explanation because, I think, if we omit the relative pronoun, what is being enumerated after the first element "children are recalcitrant" could be considered ind. clauses in and of themselves and hence become run-on stentences.

This is something I admit is a very obscure rule that I cannot confirm with 100% certainty... 8-)


Paul, i love the way you parse a sentence. Could you elaborate on the following:

What does the relative pronoun "which" refer to in the orginal sentence?

Another question:

For a simple case listed below:

Wanda wore the dress that she had bought on Tuesday.

IC [indepedant clause] = Blue
DC [depedant clause] = Red

"That" is the relative pronoun and here "that" = Dress [Correct??]

Questions:

1) Can a relative pronoun refer to something besides just a simple noun [simple noun = one worded noun. For e.g. name, place, animal, thing, etc, etc]? If so could you provide a good example

2) When we have a DC being introduced by a relative pronoun is it MANDATORY for the DC to ALREADY have a subject & verb or can the "relative pronoun" count as the subject for the dependent clause?

For the example above:

IC = Wanda wore the dress.

DC = That she had bought on Tuesday.

However can the relative pronoun [relative pronoun here = that] provide the "subject" for the dependant clause or should the depedent clause already have a subject BESIDES the relative pronoun? In the above sentence the clarification isnt necessary but what about other DC.....

In the above case i realize that "she" in the DC is the subject and "had bought" is the verb. But could you have a DC where the relative pronoun provides the "subject". Is this even possible?

The reason i'm asking this is because it will really help us dope out run on sentences Vs IC, DC.......
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New post 14 Apr 2005, 18:46
This grammar page argues that you can have a series of subordinate clauses introduced by only one coordinating conjunction. It gives the example:

"My dog Floyd bolts under the bed whenever thunder booms, strangers knock on the door, or I reach for the flea shampoo."

Whether this page is correct or not, however, I don't know. Just more grist for the mill. :-) I understand the logic of what Praveen is saying.[/url]
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New post 14 Apr 2005, 20:40
Quote:
What does the relative pronoun "which" refer to in the orginal sentence?

"world"
Quote:
Another question:

For a simple case listed below:

Wanda wore the dress that she had bought on Tuesday.

IC [indepedant clause] = Blue
DC [depedant clause] = Red

"That" is the relative pronoun and here "that" = Dress [Correct??]

:yes
Quote:
2) When we have a DC being introduced by a relative pronoun is it MANDATORY for the DC to ALREADY have a subject & verb or can the "relative pronoun" count as the subject for the dependent clause?

eg My parents bought the house which is around the corner
"which" is the relative pronoun playing the role of the subject.

Quote:
1) Can a relative pronoun refer to something besides just a simple noun [simple noun = one worded noun. For e.g. name, place, animal, thing, etc, etc]? If so could you provide a good example

From Webster onine grammar dictionnary: http://www.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/clau ... estrictive

Some relative clauses will refer to more than a single word in the preceding text; they can modify an entire clause or even a series of clauses.
Charlie didn't get the job in administration, which really surprised his friends.
Charlie didn't get the job in administration, and he didn't even apply for the Dean's position, which really surprised his friends

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Re: We live in a world in which crime is rampant, children are [#permalink]

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New post 15 Dec 2015, 13:30
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Re: We live in a world in which crime is rampant, children are   [#permalink] 15 Dec 2015, 13:30

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