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We may say for a book, for example, that it has been very

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We may say for a book, for example, that it has been very [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2006, 06:51
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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We may say for a book, for example, that it has been very much
praised, very much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not
that it have been very praised, very criticized, or
very applauded.

(A) for a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it have
been very praised, very criticized, or
(B) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it have
been very praised, very criticized, or
(C) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been
very praised, very criticized, or
(D) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been
very praised, very criticized, and
(E) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, and not that it has been
very praised, very criticized, and

Last edited by GMATT73 on 02 Sep 2006, 19:43, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2006, 08:00
Picking C.
A and B are out b'coz of "have".
In the non-underlined part, the list of examples is not finite. Hence "and so on" is appropriate.
However in the underlined part, we have three finite examples hence : X,Y or Z. "or" is better suited here.
Edited---> On second thoughts, I think that the comma before "and" in D and E also makes C a better choice.
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Last edited by buzzgaurav on 01 Sep 2006, 08:14, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2006, 08:10
I will go for D.

X,y and Z is not perfect for the finite list ?
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Re: SC Books [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2006, 08:37
GMATT73 wrote:
We may say for a book, for example, that it has been very much
praised, very much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not
that it have been very praised, very criticized, or
very applauded.

(A) for a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it have
been very praised, very criticized, or
(B) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it have
been very praised, very criticized, or
(C) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been
very praised, very criticized, or
(D) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been
very praised, very criticized, and
(E) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, and not that it has been
very praised, very criticized, and


Picking D here. I think its appropriate to use "of" instead of for because we are stating an opinion about a book.

A was wrong because it uses have been in the second clause, it should has as we need a singular. Out of all the choices, D seems the most parallel
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2006, 08:42
going with D on this..i think we need an "and" at the end since thats the last point of comparison we are making...
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Re: SC Books [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2006, 11:12
We may say of("OF" used for non living,"FOR" used with living), for example, that it has been very much praised, very much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been very praised, very criticized, and (||ism) very applauded.

(D)
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 09:03
Its either (C) or (D) ... I'm pretty confused :(
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 09:18
"very praised, very criticized, or very applauded"... all these are different alternatives. When the book is praised it is not criticized..

hence the usage has to be "it has been very praised, very criticized, or.."

what do u say guys??
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 09:27
Actually a book can be criticized,praised and applauded,all at the same time.i think its got to be (D)
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 12:25
Has to be btwen C & A. Should we use "and" or "or"?
Going with C on this one.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 19:42
ak_idc wrote:
Matt, what is OA?


Not yet. A little more discussion needed her. Dahiya, Apollo, U2Lover, ...where are you guys?
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SC Books @Dahiya, Apollo, U2 Lover...your input please [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 20:00
I know that you are waiting for input from our SC experts, same here :)

I am still sticking with the reasoning for usage of "of".

I had earlier picked D, but now changing my answer choice to C. The only difference between C and D was with the usage of "or" in C and usage of "and" in D

It is a parallelism question, "and so on" is used in the question as we use "etc" for more in the list.

Another thing for the second part I realised was that a book cannot be criticized and applauded the same time. So "or" is a better choice than "and"
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 22:44
I am with E here :shock:

A and B clearly can't be the answers

I think the message plays a role here:

we say very X AND not X
we say very X BUT not Y

I think this is the key... BUT shows contrast and we aren't talking about opposites... we are talking about emphasis.


(C) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been very praised, very criticized, OR
NOT PARALLEL and USES "BUT": That very X, very Y, very Z, and so on....BUT NOT That X, Y,OR[/b] Z


(D) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been
very praised, very criticized, and
"BUT" is used to show the contrast... and that's not what we're trying to do... they use exactly the same words adding "VERY" to each in the 1st part...

(E) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very
much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, and not that it has been very praised, very criticized, and
this is a statement... We say of a book that it is very X, very Y, very Z, and not that it is X, Y and Z

Correct me if I am wrong :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2006, 22:58
I go with C.

We can say X, Y and Z but not A , B or C.

difference between C and D is
C says we can't use any of A,B or C.
D says we can't use A,B and C (i.e all together)
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2006, 02:52
:lol: Interesting discussion guys, but I think dahiya nailed it. Vote with dahiya for C.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2006, 07:10
C) of a book, for example, that it has been very much praised, very much criticized, very much applauded, and so on, but not that it has been very praised, very criticized, or

Only D/C are the narrow choices.

The "and so on" implies multiple qualifications for the book, all of which may be true at the same time.

The sentence uses only three such qualifications to indicate an example, so it needs OR.

Answer: C
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2006, 08:08
buzzgaurav wrote:
Picking C.
A and B are out b'coz of "have".
In the non-underlined part, the list of examples is not finite. Hence "and so on" is appropriate.
However in the underlined part, we have three finite examples hence : X,Y or Z. "or" is better suited here.
Edited---> On second thoughts, I think that the comma before "and" in D and E also makes C a better choice.


Great discussion and thorough analysis. As expected, Buzz nailed it right of the bat! Hat's off to Buzz :cool

OA is indeed (C)
  [#permalink] 03 Sep 2006, 08:08
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