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What is the minimum number of shipping boxes Company L

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What is the minimum number of shipping boxes Company L [#permalink] New post 23 May 2006, 21:44
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Hi All!

I felt that the Kaplan book had a wrong answer for a question. I just wanted someone to verify/comment if what I think is right. The question is:

What is the minimum number of shipping boxes Company L will need in order to ship 120 rectangular packages, all of which have exactly the same dimensions?
(1) The dimensions of the packages are 3 inches in length, 4 inches in depth, and 6 inches in height.
(2) The volume of one shipping box is one cubic foot.


"The correct answer is C (according to the book). We need both statements to solve the problem". The book assumes that the shipping boxes are cubes, and hence the dimensions are 1 foot by 1 foot by 1 foot.

My argument is, the volume of a shipping box is 1 cu. foot. This does not mean that the box needs to be a cube. Cubic foot is just the unit of measurement. The shipping box could have measured 1 foot by 1/5 foot by 5 feet. In which case, both statements are not sufficient to solve the problem.

Please let me know your comments on this. Thanks a Lot!

~ Rrajiv
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Re: A DS Question from Kaplan 2005 [#permalink] New post 23 May 2006, 21:50
rrajiv wrote:
Hi All!

I felt that the Kaplan book had a wrong answer for a question. I just wanted someone to verify/comment if what I think is right. The question is:

What is the minimum number of shipping boxes Company L will need in order to ship 120 rectangular packages, all of which have exactly the same dimensions?
(1) The dimensions of the packages are 3 inches in length, 4 inches in depth, and 6 inches in height.
(2) The volume of one shipping box is one cubic foot.


"The correct answer is C (according to the book). We need both statements to solve the problem". The book assumes that the shipping boxes are cubes, and hence the dimensions are 1 foot by 1 foot by 1 foot.

My argument is, the volume of a shipping box is 1 cu. foot. This does not mean that the box needs to be a cube. Cubic foot is just the unit of measurement. The shipping box could have measured 1 foot by 1/5 foot by 5 feet. In which case, both statements are not sufficient to solve the problem.

Please let me know your comments on this. Thanks a Lot!

~ Rrajiv


I think you're right. Without knowing the real dimensions of the box, we cannot know the "fit" of the packages inside the box.

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 [#permalink] New post 23 May 2006, 21:52
St1:
Insufficient. We only have the dimensions of the package, and do not have any information about the box.

St2:
Insufficient. No information about the size of the package.

Using St1 and St2:
Each box = 72 cubic inches
We have the size of the shipping box.

So we can calculate how many of these boxes are needed for 120 of the packages.

Ans C

Last edited by ywilfred on 23 May 2006, 21:55, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A DS Question from Kaplan 2005 [#permalink] New post 23 May 2006, 21:54
rrajiv wrote:
Hi All!

I felt that the Kaplan book had a wrong answer for a question. I just wanted someone to verify/comment if what I think is right. The question is:

What is the minimum number of shipping boxes Company L will need in order to ship 120 rectangular packages, all of which have exactly the same dimensions?
(1) The dimensions of the packages are 3 inches in length, 4 inches in depth, and 6 inches in height.
(2) The volume of one shipping box is one cubic foot.


"The correct answer is C (according to the book). We need both statements to solve the problem". The book assumes that the shipping boxes are cubes, and hence the dimensions are 1 foot by 1 foot by 1 foot.

My argument is, the volume of a shipping box is 1 cu. foot. This does not mean that the box needs to be a cube. Cubic foot is just the unit of measurement. The shipping box could have measured 1 foot by 1/5 foot by 5 feet. In which case, both statements are not sufficient to solve the problem.

Please let me know your comments on this. Thanks a Lot!

~ Rrajiv


We're told the voume of the box is cubic ft. This is sufficient as we do not care how the dimensions work out. Whether its 1x1x1 or 1x1/5x5, the volume is always constant.

If we have a box that is 1 cubic ft, and each package has a volume, say 1/2 cubic ft, then we know each packing box is going to contain only 2 such packages.
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Re: A DS Question from Kaplan 2005 [#permalink] New post 23 May 2006, 23:14
ywilfred wrote:
rrajiv wrote:
Hi All!

I felt that the Kaplan book had a wrong answer for a question. I just wanted someone to verify/comment if what I think is right. The question is:

What is the minimum number of shipping boxes Company L will need in order to ship 120 rectangular packages, all of which have exactly the same dimensions?
(1) The dimensions of the packages are 3 inches in length, 4 inches in depth, and 6 inches in height.
(2) The volume of one shipping box is one cubic foot.


"The correct answer is C (according to the book). We need both statements to solve the problem". The book assumes that the shipping boxes are cubes, and hence the dimensions are 1 foot by 1 foot by 1 foot.

My argument is, the volume of a shipping box is 1 cu. foot. This does not mean that the box needs to be a cube. Cubic foot is just the unit of measurement. The shipping box could have measured 1 foot by 1/5 foot by 5 feet. In which case, both statements are not sufficient to solve the problem.

Please let me know your comments on this. Thanks a Lot!

~ Rrajiv


We're told the voume of the box is cubic ft. This is sufficient as we do not care how the dimensions work out. Whether its 1x1x1 or 1x1/5x5, the volume is always constant.

If we have a box that is 1 cubic ft, and each package has a volume, say 1/2 cubic ft, then we know each packing box is going to contain only 2 such packages.


Let me give you an example:

The package being 6"x8"x2" = 96sq in
The box being 8"x8"x3 = 192 sq in.

Can you place 2 such packages in the box?

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 [#permalink] New post 23 May 2006, 23:25
Well cubic foot is used to refer to 1 x 1 x 1!!

if they meant otherwise they wud have said 1 foot cube!


Likewise,

I cubic meter and 1 meter cube is the same volume, but the former also indicates that the sides are of the unit length!
  [#permalink] 23 May 2006, 23:25
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