Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 25 Jul 2014, 08:07

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
User avatar
Affiliations: FRM Charter holder
Joined: 02 Dec 2006
Posts: 736
Schools: Stanford, Chicago Booth, Babson College
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 15 [0], given: 4

GMAT Tests User
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a [#permalink] New post 21 May 2007, 20:17
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

33% (00:00) correct 67% (03:28) wrong based on 12 sessions
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a law was enacted requiring that manufacturers use the term “imitation butter” to indicate butter whose butterfat content had been diminished through the addition of water. Today, it is known that the high cholesterol content of butterfat makes it harmful to human health. Since the public should be encouraged to eat foods with lower rather than higher butterfat content and since the term “imitation” with its connotations of falsity deters many people from purchasing products so designated, manufactures who wish to give reduced-butterfat butter the more appealing name of “lite butter” should be allowed to do so.
Which one of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?
(A) The manufacturers who prefer to use the word “lite” instead of “imitation” are motivated principally by the financial interest of their stock holders.
(B) The manufacturers who wish to call their product “lite butter” plan to change the composition of the product so that it contains more water than it now does.
(C) Some individuals who need to reduce their intake of cholesterol are not deterred from using the reduced-butterfat product by the negative connotations of the term “imitation.”
(D) Cholesterol is only one of many factors that contribute to the types of health problems with which the consumption of excessive amounts of cholesterol is often associated.
(E) Most people deterred from eating “imitation butter” because of its name choose alternatives with a lower butterfat content than this product has.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 May 2007
Posts: 181
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 21 May 2007, 20:27
I choose E.

If most people chose a product with lesser fat ( which means better health), there is no need to change the name
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 754
Location: Dallas, Texas
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 22 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 21 May 2007, 21:06
E !
_________________

"Education is what remains when one has forgotten everything he learned in school."

Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Post MBA, working in the area of Development Finance
Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 170
Location: Africa
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 1

 [#permalink] New post 21 May 2007, 21:07
E seems to strengthen the argument!
I think, the answer should be C.
What is the OA?

iamba wrote:
I choose E.

If most people chose a product with lesser fat ( which means better health), there is no need to change the name
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 13 Mar 2007
Posts: 550
Schools: MIT Sloan
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 21 May 2007, 21:49
another E
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Post MBA, working in the area of Development Finance
Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 170
Location: Africa
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 1

Re: CR: Butterfat [#permalink] New post 21 May 2007, 22:29
The argument is
the name be changed to "lite butter" from "imitation butter" as
the term “imitation” with its connotations of falsity deters many people from purchasing products so designated.
Choice E says
Most people deterred from eating “imitation butter” because of its name choose alternatives with a lower butterfat content than this product has

The fact stated in choice E above is the reason why the name was changed. This seems to strengthen the argument.

On the contrary, Choice C seems to negate the argument.

Am I on a different frequency here?

aurobindo wrote:
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a law was enacted requiring that manufacturers use the term “imitation butter” to indicate butter whose butterfat content had been diminished through the addition of water. Today, it is known that the high cholesterol content of butterfat makes it harmful to human health. Since the public should be encouraged to eat foods with lower rather than higher butterfat content and since the term “imitation” with its connotations of falsity deters many people from purchasing products so designated, manufactures who wish to give reduced-butterfat butter the more appealing name of “lite butter” should be allowed to do so.
Which one of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?
(A) The manufacturers who prefer to use the word “lite” instead of “imitation” are motivated principally by the financial interest of their stock holders.
(B) The manufacturers who wish to call their product “lite butter” plan to change the composition of the product so that it contains more water than it now does.
(C) Some individuals who need to reduce their intake of cholesterol are not deterred from using the reduced-butterfat product by the negative connotations of the term “imitation.”
(D) Cholesterol is only one of many factors that contribute to the types of health problems with which the consumption of excessive amounts of cholesterol is often associated.
(E) Most people deterred from eating “imitation butter” because of its name choose alternatives with a lower butterfat content than this product has.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Oct 2008
Posts: 378
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 80 [0], given: 28

Re: CR: Butterfat [#permalink] New post 29 Aug 2012, 17:45
Artemov wrote:
The argument is
the name be changed to "lite butter" from "imitation butter" as
the term “imitation” with its connotations of falsity deters many people from purchasing products so designated.
Choice E says "Most people deterred from eating “imitation butter” because of its name choose alternatives with a lower butterfat content than this product has"

The fact stated in choice E above is the reason why the name was changed. This seems to strengthen the argument.

On the contrary, Choice C seems to negate the argument.
Am I on a different frequency here?

aurobindo wrote:
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a law was enacted requiring that manufacturers use the term “imitation butter” to indicate butter whose butterfat content had been diminished through the addition of water. Today, it is known that the high cholesterol content of butterfat makes it harmful to human health. Since the public should be encouraged to eat foods with lower rather than higher butterfat content and since the term “imitation” with its connotations of falsity deters many people from purchasing products so designated, manufactures who wish to give reduced-butterfat butter the more appealing name of “lite butter” should be allowed to do so.
Which one of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?
(A) The manufacturers who prefer to use the word “lite” instead of “imitation” are motivated principally by the financial interest of their stock holders.
(B) The manufacturers who wish to call their product “lite butter” plan to change the composition of the product so that it contains more water than it now does.
(C) Some individuals who need to reduce their intake of cholesterol are not deterred from using the reduced-butterfat product by the negative connotations of the term “imitation.”
(D) Cholesterol is only one of many factors that contribute to the types of health problems with which the consumption of excessive amounts of cholesterol is often associated.
(E) Most people deterred from eating “imitation butter” because of its name choose alternatives with a lower butterfat content than this product has.
It is as simple as this. E says that most consumers of Imitation butter(IE) with say 70% of butterfat content have shifted to other alternative in market, say X, which has 20% of butterfat content. Now, even if IE changes its name to Lite Butter, most of consumers, who have shifted to X wont come back to Lite Butter, because X has lesser butterfat content. So, changing name wont help IE.

Official Answer- E

Official Explanation follows:
People used to think that butterfat was nutritious and healthful, and at that time a law was passed requiring that butter that had been diluted with water be labeled “imitation butter.” Now, the author says, we know that butterfat is unhealthy, so people should be encouraged to eat foods with lower butterfat content. The term “imitation” deters people from buying diluted butter, so the law should allow this product to be labeled “lite butter,” a more appealing name.

We can weaken this by showing that the author’s solution won’t help the problem, as choice (E) does. (E) explains that the name “imitation butter” provides a service, because people shy away from it and instead buy products with even lower butterfat contents. This is not so good for the imitation butter industry, but it undermines the author’s argument, and so it’s correct. Speaking of the industry, choice (A) tries to explain that the decision to use the word “lite” was motivated by financial greed, but the reason for the decision doesn’t have enough of an effect on the argument to be considered a weakener.
As so often, the motivation behind a plan is not especially relevant to the wisdom of that plan. Choice (B) would have the imitation butter makers watering their butter even more, which might help people eat even less butterfat, which is a good thing, so (B) strengthens the author’s argument, if anything. (C) tells us that some people eat imitation butter despite its name — well, that’s good, but it’s the people who are deterred from it and instead eat real butter that the manufacturers are concerned with. And (D) focuses on the detail of cholesterol in butter and its effects on health, which can’t weaken the argument — just because it’s not the only factor doesn’t mean it’s not an important factor, and it doesn’t mean that the author’s plan won’t work.

Addition: The conclusion is about people who are deterred by the name "imitation butter"...so C is outside the scope of the argument.
_________________

If you know what you're worth, then go out and get what you're worth. But you gotta be willing to take the hits, and not pointing fingers saying you ain't where you wanna be because of anybody! Cowards do that and You're better than that!
The path is long, but self-surrender makes it short; the way is difficult, but perfect trust makes it easy.

Fire the final bullet only when you are constantly hitting the Bull's eye, till then KEEP PRACTICING.
Failure establishes only this, that our determination to succeed was not strong enough.
Getting defeated is just a temporary notion, giving it up is what makes it permanent.

Press +1 Kudos, if you think my post gave u a tiny tip.


Last edited by joshnsit on 27 Dec 2013, 11:56, edited 1 time in total.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: 2000 posts! I don't know whether I should feel great or sad about it! LOL
Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 1727
Location: Peru
Schools: Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT & HKS (Government)
WE 1: Economic research
WE 2: Banking
WE 3: Government: Foreign Trade and SMEs
Followers: 63

Kudos [?]: 250 [0], given: 109

GMAT Tests User
Re: When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a [#permalink] New post 29 Aug 2012, 17:55
+1 E

The term "imitation butter" motivates people to eat healthier foods.
_________________

"Life’s battle doesn’t always go to stronger or faster men; but sooner or later the man who wins is the one who thinks he can."

My Integrated Reasoning Logbook / Diary: my-ir-logbook-diary-133264.html

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: exam is close ... dont know if i ll hit that number
Joined: 06 Jun 2011
Posts: 207
Location: India
Concentration: International Business, Marketing
GMAT Date: 10-09-2012
GPA: 3.2
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 1

Re: When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a [#permalink] New post 29 Aug 2012, 18:06
its e
i took fairly long time to reach the answer..
_________________

just one more month for exam...

Re: When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a   [#permalink] 29 Aug 2012, 18:06
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic Citing health concerns, City X is considering ... avohden 2 22 Oct 2013, 13:32
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a vineetgupta 8 23 Mar 2007, 09:53
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a Riuscita 5 04 Apr 2006, 21:28
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a WinWinMBA 5 06 Jun 2005, 11:43
When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a saurya_s 9 22 Feb 2005, 04:07
Display posts from previous: Sort by

When butterfat was considered nutritious and healthful, a

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.