Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 19 Sep 2014, 02:01

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 652
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 190 [1] , given: 6

GMAT Tests User
When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2 [#permalink] New post 16 Mar 2009, 22:28
1
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

63% (03:05) correct 37% (01:55) wrong based on 169 sessions
When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2; and when positive integer t is divided by 5, the remainder is 3. What is the remainder when the product nt is divided by 15?

(1) n-2 is divisible by 5

(2) t is divisible by 3

OPEN DISCUSSION OF THIS QUESTION IS HERE: when-positive-integer-n-is-divided-by-3-the-remainder-is-86155.html
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

If You're Not Living On The Edge, You're Taking Up Too Much Space


Last edited by Bunuel on 02 Jun 2013, 03:56, edited 3 times in total.
Edited the question and added the OA
Kaplan GMAT Prep Discount CodesKnewton GMAT Discount CodesVeritas Prep GMAT Discount Codes
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 652
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 190 [0], given: 6

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 16 Mar 2009, 22:29
I tried to proceed in this way:
n = 3a+2
t = 5b+3
So nt = 15ab+9a+10b+6 .... no use

Stmt1: if n-2 = 5x so, n = 5x+2. Now plugged in n = 17. Remainder will be 2 while divided by 15.....
Hence, n = 15M + 2

Stmt2: if t = 3y plugged in 18 and the remainder is 3 while divided by 15
Hence, t = 15N +3

stmt 1+ stmt 2: nt = (15M+2)*(15N+3)..... remainder is 6 ....suffice

...but this way it's too much confusing and time consuming....do you suggest any other way?
_________________

If You're Not Living On The Edge, You're Taking Up Too Much Space

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 16 Mar 2009
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2009, 23:46
n = 17 ( the last digit of n had to be either 2 or 7 since n-2 mod 5 =0, any number divisible by 5 has to have last digit as 0 or 5 therefore n-2=last digit 0 or 5, n= last digit 2 or 7 )
t= 18 ( t is divisible by 3, the 1st no. that is divisible by 3 and yields 3 as remainder is 18 )

n*t mod 15, remainder = 6 (not 2, do not reduce )
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 29 Aug 2007
Posts: 2501
Followers: 53

Kudos [?]: 506 [0], given: 19

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2009, 07:54
sondenso wrote:
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
I tried to proceed in this way:
n = 3a+2
t = 5b+3
So nt = 15ab+9a+10b+6 .... no use

I stop here and deduct: whether nt divisible by 15 depends on "9a+10b+6"
1. n-2 (=3a) divisible by 5 so a must be divisible by 5, or a =5k , not suff
2. t-3 (=5b) divisible by 3 so b must be divisible by 3, or b=3r, not suff

1 and 2 combined: 9a+10b+6 =45k +30r+6 divided by 15, the remainder must be 6, suff



Picking number may be confusing and intimidating. so solving equation would be best.
_________________

Verbal: new-to-the-verbal-forum-please-read-this-first-77546.html
Math: new-to-the-math-forum-please-read-this-first-77764.html
Gmat: everything-you-need-to-prepare-for-the-gmat-revised-77983.html


GT

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Posts: 256
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2009, 06:11
scthakur wrote:
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
How to proceed? Plug in numbers or algebra?

When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2; and when positive integer t is divided by 5, the remainder is 3. What is the remainder when the product nt is divided by 15?

1) n-2 is divisible by 5

2) t is divisible by 3


What is the OA. Somehow, I got E.

From the question, n = 3a + 2, t = 5b + 3.
Hence, nt = 15ab + 9a + 10b + 6

From stmt1: n = 5x + 2 = 3a + 2 or, 3a = 5x.
Hence, nt = 15ab + 15x + 10b + 6....insufficient.

Also, including stmt2: t=3y = 5b+3
Hence, nt = 15ab + 15x + 6y
And, when nt is divided by 15, remainder will have different values....hence, E.


Please see above for the solutions - the OA is C, and the remainder is 6.
Great little problem!
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Jan 2004
Posts: 204
Location: India
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 10 [1] , given: 4

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2009, 00:01
1
This post received
KUDOS
I looked at option 2 first.
The question can be re-written as (NT/5*3).
according to option 2, t is divisible by 3. But we can not tell if N will be divisible by 5 or not......insuff.

Lets analyse option 1.
NT can be written as (N-2+2)T which is (N-2)T + 2T.
So NT/15 = ((N-2)T + 2T)/15 or (N-2)T/5*3 + 2T/5*3
There is no way you can determine the divisibilty of T.......insuff.

If u combine 1 & 2 u know that T is divisible by 3 but there will be a 2/5 factor remaining which indicates that NT is not completely divisible by 15. Thats what we are looking for..........
Correct me if i went wrong...
3 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jul 2009
Posts: 6
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [3] , given: 0

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2009, 00:06
3
This post received
KUDOS
This solution is only detailed for better understanding. Hope it helps....

n = 3a + 2
t = 5b + 3
What is the remainder when nt/15?

1) n-2 is divisible by 5
2) t is divisible by 3

1) n - 2 is divisible by 5.

n = 3a + 2
n - 2 = 3a
3a is divisible by 5 and therefore by 15

nt = 3a(5b + 3) + 2(5b + 3)
=15ab + 9a + 10b + 6
15ab and 9a are divisible by 15,
10b: no info from (1)
INSUFFICIENT

2) t = 5b + 3,
so 5b is divisible by 3 and therefore, by 15.

nt = 15ab + 9a + 10b + 6
10b is divisible by 15
15ab and 9a: no info from (2)
INSUFFICIENT

When you combine (1) and (2)...
15ab, 9a, and 10b are divisible by 15.
Therefore, nt = 15ab + 9a + 10b + 6
=15(x) + 6

C.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 30 Nov 2008
Posts: 494
Schools: Fuqua
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 123 [0], given: 15

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2009, 08:06
Here is one other way of solving the problem.

It is given in the question stem -

n when divided by 3 leaves a remainder 2 ==> n-2 is divisible by 3.
t when divided by 5 leaves a remainder 3 ==> t-3 is divisible by 5.

Question being asked is what is the remainder when nt is divided by 15.

Clue 1 ==> it is given n-2 is divisible by 5 and from given information, we know n-2 is also divisible by 2 ==> n-2 is divisible by 15. But nothing is mentioned abt t. Hence insufficient clue.

Clue 2 ==> it is given t is divisible by 3, we can derive that t-3 is also divisible by 3. From the given information, we know t-3 is divisble by 5 ==> t-3 is divisible by 3 and 5 ==> t-3 is divisible by 15. Nothing is mentioned abt n. Hence insufficient clue.

Combine both the clues

n-2 = 15a ==> n = 15a + 2
t-3 = 15b ==> t = 15b + 3

nt = (15a + 2)(15b + 3) ==> 15.15.a.b + 15.3.a + 15.2.b + 6

Clearly first 3 terms are divisible by 15. So the remainder should be 6.

Hence both the clues are sufficient to say the remainder of nt.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Dec 2008
Posts: 7
Schools: Emory
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2009, 12:12
what's up guys? i too originally missed this question during a practice exam. However, after reviewing it without time constraints, I realized that even when you don't understand a DS problem, always employ logic if you have to guess.

from the stem, given:

n= 3x+2
t= 5y+3

the best approach i discovered is simply to algebraically determine what n and t are in order to determine what the remainder of nt is

(i) given (n-2)/5 which can be expressed as n-2 = 5x
-now solve for n using the equation for n as given in the stem and substitute for x using (i)

n-2= 5x, x= (n-2)/5, now plugging into n as given in stem:
n = 3((n-2)/5)+2 this solves for n = 2. However, since not given anything for t, can eliminate A&D


(ii) now, in this statement, t is divisible by 3 can be written as t = 3y

-now plugging in this equation into the equation given in the stem ( t = 5y+3) and substituting y = t/3 as given in (ii): t = 5(t/3) +3.......solving for this equation yields t=-9/2. However, this statement gives nothing about n as required to solve for the remainder of nt/15. Hence, we can eliminate B.

now combined: n=2 and t= -9/2.........nt = -9

no need to solve for remainder! However, if you chose to calculate, you would soon realize that the remainder is 0. Try it and see for yourself..... :)


According to sojafon: nt = 15ab + 9a + 10b + 6. However, ab+9a+10b is not equal to X from a distributive property standpoint as assumed by 15X+6. Therefore the remainder is not 6 as assumed.

This is the only true and proven method I can see to be employed in order to solve this problem. However, if you were to employ a systematic approach, you will see that (i) gives nothing about t, which means eliminate AD. And (ii) says nothing about n, eliminate B. This leaves you with a 50/50 guess for C or E.

OA is C.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jul 2009
Posts: 6
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 0

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2009, 20:54
embrya2k wrote:
According to sojafon: nt = 15ab + 9a + 10b + 6. However, ab+9a+10b is not equal to X from a distributive property standpoint as assumed by 15X+6. Therefore the remainder is not 6 as assumed.
OA is C.


Incorrect. 15 wasn't factored out of 15ab alone, but 9a and 10b as well. I showed that 15ab, 9a and 10b are all divisible by 15 when you combine (1) and (2) and rewrote 15ab + 9a + 10b + 6 as 15x+6 to make the answer more obvious.

nt = 15ab + 9a + 10b + 6,
nt = 15x + 6

x is just a variable that represents the sum/value that's left after factoring 15 out of 15ab + 9a + 10b. This is essentially the same as
nt = 15p + 15q + 15r + 6
nt =15(p + q + r) + 6,
Let x be the sum of p, q and r.
x = p + q + r
nt = 15x + 6.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Oct 2009
Posts: 113
Schools: MIT LGO (Admitted), Harvard (Admitted))
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 0

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2009, 18:50
I used the same method as priyankur_saha. I think the answer is C.

Also if using numbers , N=17 and T =18 remainder is 6. The only problems with plugging in numbers is that you are not sure if the number you picked represent all cases. So although the first method is longer, I would prefer it over the number plugging way. However, on the test, if you don't have the time to invest, use 17 and 18.
_________________

Dream the impossible and do the incredible.

Live. Love. Laugh.

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 Oct 2009
Posts: 13
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 0

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2009, 23:26
Yeah. Solving these type of question by algebra is better option than plugging the number as sometimes we forget to put the the different kind of numbers.

IMO C, and remainder is 6.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 204
Schools: Sloan '14 (S)
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 75 [0], given: 16

GMAT Tests User
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2009, 23:46
I agree that the answer is C. I solved it using the algebraic approach, but again... this is not a very fast approach.

From the problem statement we know:
n=3*x+2
t=5*y+3

Statement 1:

n-2=5*x
n=5*x+2

Plug into nt/15:
(5x+2)*(5y+3)/15

NOT SUFFICIENT --> There is no way to isolate a portion that is not divisible by 15.

Statement 2:

t=3*y

Plug into nt/15:

(3x+2)(3y)/15

NOT SUFFICIENT --> There is no way to isolate a portion that is not divisible by 15.

Statement 1 and 2:

(5x+2)(3y)/15
(15xy+6y)/15

If 6y/15 has a constant remainder than we can answer the question:

6*1/15 --> R=6
6*2/15 --> R=12
6*3/15 --> R=3
6*4/15 --> R=9
6*5/15 --> R=0
6*6/15 --> R=6
6*7/15 --> R=12
6*8/15 --> R=3

As you can see, the remainder is different values, but if you remember from the original problem statement. You can see that when t is divided by 5, the remainder must be 3:

6*1/15 --> R=6 because 3*1/5 has R=3
6*6/15 --> R=6 because 3*6/5 has R=3

Therefore the answer is C and the remainder is 6.
2 KUDOS received
Current Student
avatar
Joined: 04 Nov 2009
Posts: 78
Schools: NYU Stern '12
WE 1: Business Development
WE 2: Superhero- shhhhhh
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 16 [2] , given: 10

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 01 Dec 2009, 18:44
2
This post received
KUDOS
I think plugging numbers is the easiest way to do this.

This question is about pattern recognition.
By listing out the possible solutions for each, you can see a definite pattern.

Possible Solutions for n given stem- 2, 5,8,11,14,17,20,23,26,29,32,35,38,41...
Possible solutions for t given stem- 3,8,13,18,23,28,33,38,43,48,53,58...

I. Using n-2 is divisble by 5, you get n=17,32,47..., notice the difference is 15, meaning each remainder will be the same when multiplying (Note that it is important that they specify integers)
However this gives us no indication as to the remainder of t - Insuff

II Using t is divisible by 3, you get t=3,18,33,48... again, the difference is 15, meaning each remainder will be the same.
No indication of n- insuff

You know that each remainder will be the same (in this case 6), C is suff since each individual number when divided by 15 will give the same remainder.

Thoughts?
_________________

"Any school that meets you and still lets you in is not a good enough school to go to" - my mom upon hearing i got in
Thanks mom.

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 48
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 15 [0], given: 0

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 02 Dec 2009, 09:48
It seems that the consensus is for C being the answer. Despite this I keep getting E, and would appreciate if anyone can point out the pitfall in my reasoning:

From the stem:

n=3a+2 a=[0, 1, 2, ..)
t=5b+3 b=[0, 1, 2, ..)

hence nt/15 = (3a+2)*(5b+3)/15=(15ab+9a+10b+6)/15=ab+3a/5+2b/3+2/5
ab is always an integer, so for the purpose of the question can be neglected

I)n=5c+2=3a+2 a=5/3c
nt/15=3/5*5/3c+2/3b+2/5=c+2/3b+2/5
c is always an integer and can be neglected, but nothing can be said of 2/3b+2/5, hence NS

II) t=3d=5b+3 b=3/5*(d-1)
nt/15=3/5a+2/3*3/5*(d-1)+2/5=3/5a+2/5d
d=[1, 2, ..)
hence NS

I+II)nt/15=c+2/5d
c is always an integer and can be neglected.
nt/15=2/5d
or
nt=int+6*d
we cannot find a single value for the remainder, hence E
Expert Post
4 KUDOS received
Math Expert
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 23480
Followers: 3500

Kudos [?]: 26409 [4] , given: 2710

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 06 Feb 2011, 14:35
4
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2; and when positive integer t is divided by 5, the remainder is 3. What is the remainder when the product nt is divided by 15?

From the stem: n=3p+2 and t=5q+3.
nt=15pq+9p+10q+6, we should find the remainder when this expression is divided by 15.

(1) n-2 is divisible by 5 --> n-2=5m --> n=5m+2=3p+2 --> 5m=3p, 15m=9p --> nt=15pq+9p+10q+6=15pq+15m+10q+6. Clearly 15pq and 15m are divisible by 15, so remainder by dividing these components will be 0. But we still know nothing about 10q+6. Not sufficient.

(2) t is divisible by 3 --> means that 5q+3 is divisible by 3 --> 5q is divisible by 3 or q is divisible by 3 --> 5q=5*3z=15z --> 10q=30z --> nt=15pq+9p+10q+6=15pq+9p+30z+6. 15pq and 30z are divisible by 15. Know nothing about 9p+6. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) 9p=15m and 10q=30z --> nt=15pq+9p+10q+6=15pq+15m+30z+6. Remainder when this expression is divided by 15 is 6. Sufficient.

Answer: C.

OR:

From the stem: n=3p+2 and t=5q+3.

(1) n-2 is divisible by 5 --> n-2=5m --> n=5m+2 and n=3p+2 --> general formula for n would be n=15k+2 (about deriving general formula for such problems at: good-problem-90442.html#p723049 and manhattan-remainder-problem-93752.html#p721341) --> nt=(15k+2)(5q+3)=15*5kq+15*3k+10q+6 --> first two terms are divisible by 15 (15*5kq+15*3k) but we don't know about the last two terms (10q+6). Not sufficient.

(2) t is divisible by 3 --> t=3r and t=5q+3 --> general formula for t would be t=15x+3 --> nt=(3p+2)(15x+3)=15*3px+9p+15*2x+6. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) nt=(15k+2)(15x+3)=15*15kx+15*3k+15*2x+6 this expression divided by 15 yields remainder of 6. Sufficient.

Answer: C.
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 11 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis NEW!!!; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) NEW!!!; 12. Tricky questions from previous years. NEW!!!;

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
25 extra-hard Quant Tests

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Manhattan GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 373
Followers: 131

Kudos [?]: 229 [1] , given: 10

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2011, 22:35
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Here's more of a plain English explanation, for those who like that sort of thing. :)

An important principle here is that you can multiply remainders. For instance, 10/7 = 1 r2 and 9/7 = 1 r3. 10*9/7 = 12 r6. See? Remainder 2 * remainder 3 = remainder 6.

Notice that if the resulting remainder is greater than the divisor, it wraps around again. 10/4=2 r 2 and 15/4=3 r 3. 10*15/4 should be remainder 6, but since 4 goes into 6, there is only 2 left. The actual result is 17 r2.

So, back to our problem. Using the prompt and statement 1, we know that both n/3 and n/5 have remainders of 2. We also know that t/5 has a remainder of 3.

So, if we just wanted to know the remainder when nt is divided by 5, we could multiply our remainders: 2 for n and 3 for t = 6. Since 5 goes into 6, we would be left with a remainder of 1.

However, since we’re dealing with 15, it’s more complicated. We know the remainder when n is divided by 15. Since n must be 2 more than a multiple of 3 and 2 more than a multiple of 5, it will also be 2 more than a multiple of 15:
17, 32, 47 . . .

We don’t know about t, though, unless we bring in statement 2. Once we do, we know that it is not only 3 more than a multiple of 5, but also an exact multiple of 3.

Out of our original list (3, 8, 13, 18, 23, 28, 33 . . .basically, every number that ends in 8 or 3), this leaves 3, 18, 33, 48 . . . i.e., 3 more than a multiple of 15.

Now we can multiply our remainders. n/15 has a remainder of 2 and t/15 has a remainder of 3, so nt/15 has a remainder of 6.
_________________


Dmitry Farber | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | New York


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews


Last edited by DmitryFarber on 16 Oct 2011, 11:59, edited 1 time in total.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 05 Feb 2007
Posts: 141
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 7

CAT Tests
Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2011, 11:07
DmitryFarber wrote:
Here's more of a plain English explanation, for those who like that sort of thing. :)

An important principle here is that you can multiply remainders. For instance, 10/7 = 1 r2 and 9/7 = 1 r3. 10*9/7 = 12 r6. See? Remainder 2 * remainder 3 = remainder 6.

Notice that if the resulting remainder is greater than the dividend, it wraps around again. 10/4=2 r 2 and 15/4=3 r 3. 10*15/4 should be remainder 6, but since 4 goes into 6, there is only 2 left. The actual result is 17 r2.



I think you mean the divisor, not the dividend.
Expert Post
Manhattan GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 373
Followers: 131

Kudos [?]: 229 [0], given: 10

Re: DS - What is the Remainder ? [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2011, 11:58
Expert's post
Thanks, giantSwawn. I definitely meant divisor, not dividend.

Mr. T says: "I pity the fool who can't tell the difference between a divisor and a dividend!" :)
_________________


Dmitry Farber | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | New York


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2010
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 3

Re: How to proceed? Plug in numbers or algebra? When positive [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2011, 23:52
can some one correct me if im wrong!!

I dont think we need statements to find the reminder, question itself provide enough info..here how i solved

n=3q+2
t=5q+3
---------
nt=15q+6

R=6
Re: How to proceed? Plug in numbers or algebra? When positive   [#permalink] 12 Nov 2011, 23:52
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2; japped187 2 01 Jun 2008, 04:49
When positive integer n is divided by 3 the remainder is 2; chineseburned 11 11 May 2008, 18:37
2 When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2; yezz 9 27 Aug 2006, 01:18
When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2; zoom612 1 29 Jul 2006, 22:01
When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2; yb 4 06 Dec 2005, 13:09
Display posts from previous: Sort by

When positive integer n is divided by 3, the remainder is 2

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 22 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.