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When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror

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Senior Manager
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When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2012, 20:09
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

50% (01:43) correct 50% (00:38) wrong based on 32 sessions
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: From Kaplan 800 SC 26 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2012, 20:15
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally

First split happens with regards to subject-verb agreement. The subject is "instinct." It is singular.
So eliminate (A) and (B).

Second split (and last split) has something to do with logical construction and proper modifier (modification).
As such I go with (C) as it grasps the entire idea of what the author is trying to say.

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Senior Manager
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Re: From Kaplan 800 SC 26 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2012, 20:22
(C) which is not a formally

(D) which is formally not a

In the explanation in the book, "you'll see that the final a is neccessary to modify means."

How does a plural noun "means" need "a" ?

I looked up dictionary, and it says "means" can be both singular and plural.

Then, is "means" in this sentence considered singular becuase of "a verdict"?

Also, in the explanation in the book, "D changes the meaning of the sentence.

How??? :shock:
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Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 16

Re: From Kaplan 800 SC 26 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2012, 20:36
eybrj2 wrote:
(C) which is not a formally

(D) which is formally not a

In the explanation in the book, "you'll see that the final a is neccessary to modify means."

How does a plural noun "means" need "a" ?

I looked up dictionary, and it says "means" can be both singular and plural.

Then, is "means" in this sentence considered singular becuase of "a verdict"?

Also, in the explanation in the book, "D changes the meaning of the sentence.

How??? :shock:


From www.thefreedictionary.com

4. means (used with a sing. or pl. verb) A method, a course of action, or an instrument by which an act can be accomplished or an end achieved.

So as you can see, this isn't a matter of singular or plural: means is plural or singular :)

_________________

Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure... than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.
- T. Roosevelt

Re: From Kaplan 800 SC 26   [#permalink] 13 Jun 2012, 20:36
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