Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 14 Jul 2014, 03:55

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Preparing for the another shot...!
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1425
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
Followers: 123

Kudos [?]: 550 [1] , given: 62

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User Premium Member
While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2012, 08:43
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

76% (02:41) correct 23% (02:12) wrong based on 13 sessions
While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.
a) was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
b) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from
c) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
d) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
e) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

OA
[Reveal] Spoiler:
soon

_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

GMAT Pill Representative
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 346
Schools: LBS '14 (A)
GMAT 1: 770 Q48 V48
Followers: 133

Kudos [?]: 159 [0], given: 4

Re: While the stock market [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2012, 10:48
Hi Marcab.

Here is how I thought this one through....

While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

This looks like a tense issue. The sentence is trying to say that whilst one thing (stock market bounce back) has already happened. Something else (US family income) are still struggling. Let us see which of the answers below have that...[/color]

a) was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
b) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from
c) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
d) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
e) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

SO only c & d have the correct tense. The only other difference between the 2 is the last word. Is it 'between' or 'from'.

Here we are down to Idiom. From... to is correct

SO D is correct

_________________

Former GMAT Pill student, now on staff. Used GMATPILL OG 12 and nothing else: 770 (48,48) & 6.0



... and more


Last edited by plumber250 on 20 Nov 2012, 01:45, edited 1 time in total.
Expert Post
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 1710
Followers: 1174

Kudos [?]: 3057 [0], given: 176

Re: While the stock market [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2012, 12:18
Expert's post
Hi there,

Choice C cannot be the correct answer because "between... to..." is an incorrect idiom. The correct idiom is "from... to...". Hence choice C is out.

Now, grammatically two choices come very close - choice D and E. But Choice D wins because of the usage of correct verb tense "has bounced". Notice the verb tense of the Independent Clause. It says, "US familiers ARE STILL REELING". This is a present continuous tense. Present perferct "has bounced" maintains the consistency of the tenses in the sentence. Choice E fails to do so by using simple past tense "bounced". Hence choice D is the correct answer.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________



Free Webinar: July 12, 2014 - Key to score 760 on the GMAT: Register for this Free Webinar to learn how to define your GMAT strategy and create your own study plan to ace the GMAT. Click here to register.

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 19 May 2012
Posts: 36
Location: India
Concentration: International Business, Healthcare
GMAT Date: 03-03-2014
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 0

Re: While the stock market [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2012, 19:02
IMO B.

Between seems awkward...should be 'from 2001 to 2004'....


Regards,
crazy4priya
_________________

Thanks
crazy4priya
GMATPrep 1 710/Q49/V38
GMATPrep 2 690/Q49/V34
Veritas Prep 700/Q50/V36/IR5
MGMT Test 1 700/Q51/V35/IR3

Expert Post
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 1710
Followers: 1174

Kudos [?]: 3057 [0], given: 176

Re: While the stock market [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2012, 06:09
Expert's post
crazypriya wrote:
IMO B.

Between seems awkward...should be 'from 2001 to 2004'....


Regards,
crazy4priya


Hi there,

Choice B cannot be the correct answer because in this choice, two independent clauses have been joined by comma. This is not correct. Choice D is the correct answer. Semicolon correctly joins two ICs.

Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________



Free Webinar: July 12, 2014 - Key to score 760 on the GMAT: Register for this Free Webinar to learn how to define your GMAT strategy and create your own study plan to ace the GMAT. Click here to register.

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 588
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Finance
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 225 [0], given: 20

GMAT Tests User
Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2012, 22:47
Hi Plumber & Shraddha,
i think the use of "while" here suggests that 2 things were happening concurrently... or the effect of 2 things are felt
at the same time.

While X happens, Y's are still happening. (Y's = U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession)
Although X started to happen in the past, it is still happening or its effects are still felt; similar to stock market has bounced
& is still bouncing, right?

To match the use of "while" for simultaneity of events we need another event that is STILL TAKING place to the present.
Otherwise, we can say "although X happened, Y's are still happening" Looks correct. Similar to saying:
Although the stock market bounced, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession...

Kindly correct me if am wrong.

Thanks.
_________________

KUDOS me if you feel my contribution has helped you.

Expert Post
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Preparing for the another shot...!
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1425
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
Followers: 123

Kudos [?]: 550 [0], given: 62

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2012, 23:03
Expert's post
gmatbull wrote:
Hi Plumber & Shraddha,
i think the use of "while" here suggests that 2 things were happening concurrently... or the effect of 2 things are felt
at the same time.

While X happens, Y's are still happening. (Y's = U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession)
Although X started to happen in the past, it is still happening or its effects are still felt; similar to stock market has bounced
& is still bouncing, right?

To match the use of "while" for simultaneity of events we need another event that is STILL TAKING place to the present.
Otherwise, we can say "although X happened, Y's are still happening" Looks correct. Similar to saying:
Although the stock market bounced, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession...

Kindly correct me if am wrong.

Thanks.


Hii BULL,
The red portion implies that the cause was over, when the sentence was being written. So the red portion can't be parallel to the the next clause. IMO, had it been "Although the stock market HAS bounced, US families bla bla bla". In the same way, "while" has been used. Usage of "while the stock market has bounced" implies that we are talking of an event in the present tense and because of the usage of "while", a simultaneous event is expected.
_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 588
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Finance
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 225 [1] , given: 20

GMAT Tests User
Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2012, 23:31
1
This post received
KUDOS
Marcab, thanks for the explanations.
"while" suggests 2 simultaneous events, but "although" signifies the contrasting nature of the events.
For example,
(i) Although the stock market bounced some 5 yrs ago, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession.
We expected that after stock bounced economy should be ok, but families are still lurched in the recession.

(ii) While the stock market has bounced, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession.
we don't need "some 5yrs ago" since its ongoing.

Pls let me know if this makes any sense....Thanks.
_________________

KUDOS me if you feel my contribution has helped you.

Expert Post
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Preparing for the another shot...!
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1425
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
Followers: 123

Kudos [?]: 550 [0], given: 62

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2012, 23:47
Expert's post
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Sep 2012
Posts: 41
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 76

Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2012, 08:27
Hi,

While..., U.S. families are "STILL" indicates an event in applicable in present tense.
Hence Eliminate A, B, E
Between C and D. C makes a mistake in writing "between X to Y", it should be "between X AND y".
Hence D is the right answer choice.
D) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
Also Stock Market => Its (Pronoun - Antecedent agrees in number)

Please let us know the OA.

Thanks a lot.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 04 Oct 2011
Posts: 225
Location: India
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, International Business
GMAT 1: 440 Q33 V13
GMAT 2: 0 Q0 V0
GPA: 3
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 44

Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2012, 06:46
gmatbull wrote:
Hi Plumber & Shraddha,
i think the use of "while" here suggests that 2 things were happening concurrently... or the effect of 2 things are felt
at the same time.

While X happens, Y's are still happening. (Y's = U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession)
Although X started to happen in the past, it is still happening or its effects are still felt; similar to stock market has bounced
& is still bouncing, right?

To match the use of "while" for simultaneity of events we need another event that is STILL TAKING place to the present.
Otherwise, we can say "although X happened, Y's are still happening" Looks correct. Similar to saying:
Although the stock market bounced, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession...

Kindly correct me if am wrong.

Thanks.


I agree with u... looking forward experts to pool their ideas
_________________

GMAT - Practice, Patience, Persistence
Kudos if u like :)

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 78
Concentration: General Management, Leadership
Schools: IE '15 (A)
GMAT 1: 760 Q49 V46
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: -16 [0], given: 0

Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, [#permalink] New post 03 Jan 2013, 18:07
D is correct - has bounced back and are still reeling are in present tense and the Idiom from X to Y is also correct
Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low,   [#permalink] 03 Jan 2013, 18:07
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic Feeling bad but will bounce back stronger !! Zatmah 1 22 Dec 2013, 19:23
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, Onell 7 27 Mar 2011, 08:27
While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, tingle15 7 27 Jun 2010, 07:47
What brought the American semiconductor market back from the tarek99 4 24 Oct 2008, 02:52
Back from the test its 670 dreamgmat1 4 03 Aug 2007, 12:35
Display posts from previous: Sort by

While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.