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A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof

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New post 22 Jul 2016, 19:33
Thanks LogicGuru1 sayantanc2k

Would this be considered a correct sentence-
"Studies indicate that not only are GMAT Club students smarter than other students but they also score significantly higher than the rest"

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New post 23 Jul 2016, 00:11
abhishek1912 wrote:
Thanks LogicGuru1 sayantanc2k

Would this be considered a correct sentence-
"Studies indicate that not only are GMAT Club students smarter than other students but they also score significantly higher than the rest"


I think not a problem with structure of not only ...but also ...
Studies indicate that not only GMAT Club students are smarter than other students but also they score significantly higher than the rest"

but there is a problem in comparing they score significantly higher than the rest.. you are comparing score with people

I just tried ... but Experts can point out better, even if there is mistake in not only but also.

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New post 23 Jul 2016, 00:33
Thanks for correcting that mbaprep2016 , though i'm more interested in the validity of the clause parallelism.

Here's the updated sentence -
"Studies indicate that not only are GMAT Club students smarter than other students but they also score significantly higher than do the rest"

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New post 23 Jul 2016, 03:20
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abhishek1912 wrote:
Thanks for correcting that mbaprep2016 , though i'm more interested in the validity of the clause parallelism.

Here's the updated sentence -
"Studies indicate that not only are GMAT Club students smarter than other students but they also score significantly higher than do the rest"


I don't see any not only...(clause1)...but also...(clause 2)... parallelism problem in this sentence (even though in the second clause the subject "they" comes in between "but" and "also").

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New post 28 Jul 2016, 10:08
TRICKY!!!!

I have no helpful tips on this one except A B C read weird to me because more..... so I was able to eliminate it down to D and E but after that I have no advice

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New post 23 Sep 2016, 12:46
Hello,

Can anyone please solve the following problem based on the concept of more vs greater. Source of the problem is Kaplan.

Even though the costs of paying baseball players amounts to a sum greater than one half of the overall cost of operating a Major League Baseball team last year, Major League Baseball franchise owners were still willing to pay increasingly higher salaries to top players.

(a) amounted to more
(b) amounted to greater


Thanks !

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New post 23 Sep 2016, 22:28
My thoughts :

Even though the costs of paying baseball players amounted to greater than one half of the overall cost of operating a Major League Baseball team last year, Major League Baseball franchise owners were still willing to pay increasingly higher salaries to top players.

Greater is used for comparing two different things.

Ex: The price of gold is several orders magnitude greater than the price of silver.
We are comparing the price of two different metals.

For rest of the type comparison more can be used.

BTW, what is the official answer for above question.

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New post 24 Sep 2016, 06:09
dharan wrote:
My thoughts :

Even though the costs of paying baseball players amounted to greater than one half of the overall cost of operating a Major League Baseball team last year, Major League Baseball franchise owners were still willing to pay increasingly higher salaries to top players.

Greater is used for comparing two different things.

Ex: The price of gold is several orders magnitude greater than the price of silver.
We are comparing the price of two different metals.

For rest of the type comparison more can be used.

BTW, what is the official answer for above question.


Hello Dharan,

Even I chose greater over more because of the points discussed above in the thread.

When we compare things that are number in itself such as proportion, area, volume, cost, we must use greater.

However, OA is amounted to more.

I doubt OA. Can anyone please explain ?

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New post 24 Sep 2016, 08:53
LithiumIon wrote:
2016 GMAT Official Guide, Question 10, Pg. 675

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely


gmat test meaning and logic and this testing is sometime so simple that it becomes very hard.

in A.

they had a likelihood of coronary desease

I think the phrase "likelihood of coronary desease" is not logic . using our common sense, we realize this illogic thing. we should say, "likelihood of doing some thing" or "likelyhood of existence of new agent".in the combination, " likelihood of +noun", the noun should be suitable logically with " likelihood. in short, when two phrases are combined , they should be suitable logically with each other . this is the logic rule gmat test us. but gmat do not declare this rule. this is why we failed on gmat.
this rule is so simple that we never think gmat test us this rule. but this rule is key to success on sc.
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New post 03 Jan 2017, 08:13
daagh wrote:
My simple feeling is that when we use mass nouns or abstract nouns that are taken as in-disparate or inseparable, then we have to use ‘greater’. To wit

This year’s flood damage is greater than last year’s. --- One cannot count damage.
India has greater prosperity than many neighbors.
Disappointment is greater in adolescence than in adulthood.

Isn’t likelihood something that cannot be counted as one likelihood or two likelihoods?

Therefore ‘greater’ is the more appropriate word in the context.


Sir, Is This year's flood damage is more then last year's is wrong? - More can be used for both countable and uncountable nouns
As i understand, usage of greater is very much required when noun is suspected to be an number?

Please do correct me if i am wrong.

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New post 11 Jan 2017, 09:38
More on option B vs greater in option d

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New post 12 Jan 2017, 09:53
Agunner wrote:
More on option B vs greater in option d


When a quantifiable parameter (e.g., price, area, volume, density, speed, probability, likelihood etc.) is referred, "greater" is used. Hence, option D is better than option B.

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New post 02 Apr 2017, 23:34
This question confused me quite some bit. I have kind of made sense about why greater is a better choice than more but I can't understand why "had a likelihood" or "likelihood to have" in A and C respectively, is wrong. Please help.

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SS18, if you're being really strict and literal with the meaning here, (A) and (C) are both just a little bit illogical.

In (C), the clearest issue is that the verb tense is a little bit off. "... the more coffee the doctors drank, the more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease." One problem is "would have" -- the phrase conditional, which doesn't make much sense here. We're looking at facts of a study: "the more x occurred, the more y occurred". Since these are facts, it wouldn't make sense to say: "the more x occurred, the more y would have occurred." There's simply no need to make the second part of the phrase conditional.

In (A), it doesn't make much sense to say "the more they had a likelihood." It makes sense to talk about the degree to which something is likely to occur: "a higher likelihood" or "a greater likelihood." But this is subtly different: (A) is saying "the more they had a likelihood" -- which seems to express "likelihood" as a binary thing, that you either have or you don't -- so now (A) seems to say that the more the physicians drank, the higher the odds of having a likelihood. And that doesn't make much sense. (C) suffers from the same problem, too.

I hope this helps!
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New post 18 May 2017, 18:51
LithiumIon wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 677
Page: 683

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely


You have to know that likelihood is "greater" or "lesser" and not "more" or "less" to solve it.

For instance, we can't say "the likelihood is more"

We have to say "the likelihood is greater", it has to be a numerical comparison.

First glance

The choices start with one of two options: more or greater. Both words are modifiers indicating quantity, but they are used differently. Think about the meaning of the sentence as you read it.

Issues

(1) Modifier / Meaning: more

More and greater are both used to compare quantities. Consider these examples:

Vanessa has studied more than you. (correct)

Vanessa has studied greater than you. (incorrect)

The more you study, the greater your chances of success on the GMAT. (correct)

The greater you study, the more your chances of success on the GMAT. (incorrect)

Why are the incorrect options incorrect? In the first sentence (studied more), the distinction is based on quantity; perhaps Vanessa has studied for four hours and you have studied for only two. In the second sentence (studied greater), the distinction is not based on number. Perhaps Vanessa has studied more effectively than you have? The meaning is unclear, so that’s not a great sentence.

In the third sentence (the more you study), you are changing your chances of success based on the amount that you study. If you don’t study as much, your chances aren’t as good, but if you do study more, then you increase your chances—they are greater than they would have been.

The fourth sentence, though, doesn’t say that your chances increase. It says that your chances are more. You could give yourself more chances to succeed by, for example, taking the test multiple times—but that’s not what this sentence is trying to convey.

In the question, the sentence is trying to convey that, if the doctors drink more coffee, then their chances of having coronary disease increase. The proper form, then, is the more coffee [they] drank, the greater their chances (or likelihood) of having coronary disease.

In general, use the modifier greater, not the modifier more, to pair with the word likelihood. Eliminate choices (A), (B), and (C).

(2) Meaning: have a likelihood to have

The wording have a likelihood to have is redundant. The two instances of have are conveying the same meaning. Eliminate choice (C).

(3) Modifier / Meaning: greater was disease likely

What was actually greater? The disease itself is not greater; rather, the likelihood of having the disease was greater. The wording in choice (E), though, changes the word likelihood to the word likely. You can say that something is more likely to happen, but it’s not acceptable to say that something is greater likely to happen. Eliminate choice (E).

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (D) uses the accepted form the more coffee they drink, the greater was their likelihood. (You could also use the following form: The more you study, the greater your likelihood of success.)
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New post 31 May 2017, 13:15
the important issue is the question still keeps the parallel form of verbs. That is, "indicate" is present tense, but the idiom is in past tense

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If we compare first few words of answer choices, we see a split between ‘more’ and ‘greater’. If we read the sentence, we have ’more coffee….’, correct idiom is ‘the more the X, the greater the Y’. Eliminate A, B and C. We need greater.
In option E, ‘the greater coronary disease is not parallel to ‘the more coffee these doctors ….’. Eliminate E.
Hence D is the correct answer.
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New post 02 Jul 2017, 03:54
DollySharma wrote:
LithiumIon wrote:
2016 GMAT Official Guide, Question 10, Pg. 675

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely



Let's look at the structure here-

"the more coffee these doctors drank, more they had a likelihood of coronary disease

As the second part of the structure refers to 'likelihood', we need 'greater'. 'greater' is used when the noun is a number. For example: percentage, rate, likelihood, distance and population.

Also, 'likelihood' means 'the probability of a specified outcome'. Thus, it's imprecise to say they had a likelihood/probability of coronary disease. The correct usage should be "likelihood of having coronary disease'.

E goes out as it distorts the meaning. 'likelihood' was greater, NOT the disease.

This leaves us with D.


Happy Prepping! :D

Dolly Sharma





thank you very much for the answer, but as to D, why WAS is in the front of likelihood, I mean I think it should be like: greater their likelihood of have disease was?

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New post 02 Jul 2017, 10:12
dharan wrote:
Guys,

Give the concrete explanation than justifying the correct answer choice. OG 's explanation may be suitable for this question only. But it is still not clear when to use greater Vs More.

I see in MGMAT SC 6th EDITION, page 69. GREAT can be used for uncountable modifiers. But at the same time, it is also said that more, most, enough and all work with both countable ( plural ) and uncountable ( singular ) nouns. When the choices are between greater and more atleast for me is still a puzzle, as I still think "likelihood" as uncountable modifier and both more & greater can be used.


Here is what I think, on "likelihood"

A. likelihood is not a numerical quantity like, length, rate, population, number etc.. [ I dont know whether I need to include probability to justify it as a number ]
greater can be used here " The population of Colombia is greater than that of Argentina " Courtesy - beatthegmat
Here more is preferred for likelihood.

B. likelihood is like nouns that are uncountable like patience, influence, courage, water [ can be measurable not countable ], greed, anger, money.
The Etruscans had raised an army in which each soldier had selected another, and they fought with greater forces, and greater courage, than ever before.
Courtesy : Romes Italian Wars, page 214.
Here also we used greater. So in both A and B we are using greater.
Here greater is preferred for likelihood.

I am not a expert here taking snail steps to catch up the clarity. Expert comments are needed

To the highlighted text, I would rather use more number of forces and greater courage than the one used in the highlighted text.
Force is uncountable but in situation of war, soldiers/battalions combine to form units or forces which is countable. Courage however remains uncomfortable and hence the word greater is used.

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New post 29 Jul 2017, 13:10
A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely

This is an interesting question!

I would like to jot down what I have understood based on my knowledge.

more ===> used for countable nouns and uncountable nouns that are not quantity nouns/words

greater ==> used for uncountable nouns that are quantity nouns/words

Considering above points, we have the noun "likelihood" (uncountable noun) which means "probability" (quantity noun), we should be using the word "greater" here for comparison purposes.


Hence, Option A, B and C are out (Though there are other errors in A and C which I will not write as GMAT Ninja has explained it in great detail)

We are left with option D and E

Option E has multiple errors and such as it is un-idiomatic and uses an adjective "greater" to describe an adverb "likely" which is ungrammatical

We are now only left with D after POE.

Hence, Answer is D

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