GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 18 Sep 2018, 06:43

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
G
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2680
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2018, 07:34
sunny91 wrote:

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.[/b]

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely


Hi,
can we eliminate option B on the below basis-
The idiom in B is as follows:
The more X, the more Y.
In this idiom, the more cannot be followed by a verb- The more coffee these doctors drank, the more was their likelihood
The comparison in B is not grammatically viable.




Hello sunny91,

I am not sure if you still have this doubt. Here is the explanation nonetheless. :-)


The reason that you have presented cannot be used to reject Choice B.

If you compare the structure of Choice B with the correct answer choice D, they both are identical except for the word more in Choice B and greater in Choice D.

Hence, the reason that more cannot be followed by a verb is not sound enough to reject Choice B.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 316
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Sep 2018, 16:15
Hello Everyone!

Wow - this is a tricky question! Let's take a closer look at it to figure out how to arrive at the correct answer quickly! Before we get started, here is the original question with the major differences highlighted in orange:

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely


I can tell from the other comments in this section that we need to address the more vs. greater debate. For this particular sentence, here is how we need to interpret the rule:

more = countable objects / uncountable things that increase

The longer you study for your exams, the more pencils you'll need to sharpen to take notes.
My youngest child has more temper tantrums than her older sister.
(Both pencils and temper tantrums are items you can count.)

greater = nouns that are acting as, or taking the place of, a number (area, price, volume, distance, percentage, likelihood, chances, etc.)

The area of Australia is greater than that of Texas.
(The area of Australia is a number - square kilometers, acres, square miles, etc. They just don't tell us the exact number in the sentence.)

The percentage of teenagers who fail their first driver's test is greater than those who pass.
(A percentage is always a number...they just don't tell us the exact number in the sentence.)


The more/greater in this sentence is referring back to "likelihood," which is actually a noun acting as a number/percentage! The likelihood that doctors will develop coronary disease is a percentage (30%, 60%, 1 in 3, etc.). The sentence just doesn't tell us the actual percentage - it just says that there is one, and that will increase if doctors drink more coffee. Therefore, it makes the most sense to use "greater" in this case.

Therefore, we can eliminate options A, B, & C because they use "more" incorrectly.

Now that we're only left with two options, let's see which option is the better choice:

(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease

This is CORRECT because the word "greater" is correctly referring to the likelihood of a doctor developing coronary disease, not the disease itself!

(E) greater was coronary disease likely

This is INCORRECT because it muddles up the meaning. The thing that's greater in this sentence is the likelihood a doctor gets coronary disease, not the coronary disease itself.

There you have it - option D is the correct choice!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.
_________________

"Students study. GMAT assassins train."
Image

Image

★★★★★ GMAT Club Verified Reviews for EMPOWERgmat & Special Discount


GMAT Club Verbal Advantage EMPOWERgmat Critical Reasoning Question Pack

Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof &nbs [#permalink] 11 Sep 2018, 16:15

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 23 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.