GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 07 Aug 2020, 11:00

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Jan 2019
Posts: 18
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Oct 2019, 06:31
A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.


(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease

(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease

(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease

(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease

(E) greater was coronary disease likely

The word ‘likelihood’ is uncountable and it means probability. So instead of ‘more’ we have to use ‘greater’. Options A, B and C will be eliminated.

Option E distorts the meaning.
D is the correct answer.
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 05 May 2019
Posts: 154
Location: India
Schools: NYU Tech MBA "21
A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Feb 2020, 06:37
1
sayantanc2k wrote:
After going through various suggestions by GMAT experts at Magoosh and Manhattan, I could arrive at the following conclusion:

The positive....comparative...superlative forms of certain adjectives of quantity are as follows:

set 1. many...more...most
set 2. much...more....most
set 3. great...greater...greatest

While set 1 (many...more...most) is used for countable nouns, set 2 (much...more....most) and set 3 (great...greater...greatest) are used for uncountable nouns.

Now there could be 2 types of uncountable nouns
type a. Quantity word / numbers themselves (e.g. price, volume, weight, probability etc.) are uncountable.
type b. Other uncountable nouns (honesty, poverty, etc as you mentioned)

The set 2 (much...more....most) is used for type b (other uncountable nouns) uncountable nouns.
The set 3 ( great...greater...greatest) is used for type a (Quantity word / numbers) uncountable nouns.

Therefore we see that "more" can be used for (i) countable nouns and (ii) uncountable nouns that are not quantity words/ numbers.
"Greater" can be used for (iii) uncountable nouns that are quantity words/ numbers.


So both option B and D are correct?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Status: Future Ninja
Joined: 11 Jan 2020
Posts: 33
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Apr 2020, 01:35
Sarjaria84 wrote:
daagh wrote:
Saurabh
The 'had' in the original text is not a past perfect. It is the simple past of 'have'.


Thank you daagh

So in option 'A' apart from the usage of 'more' there's nothing else wrong, right?


Thanks
Saurabh


There is another error. we are talking about the likelihood of 'having' disease, not the likelyhood of disease.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 18 May 2020
Posts: 5
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V31 (Online)
CAT Tests
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 May 2020, 21:27
(D) greater WAS their likelihood of having coronary disease

--- Why isn't this " greater their likelihood of having coronary disease WAS " ?

When do we use the inverted verb form? or why do we use the inverted verb form here?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Status: BDM
Joined: 29 Jan 2019
Posts: 18
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 May 2020, 08:55
GMATNinja wrote:
SS18, if you're being really strict and literal with the meaning here, (A) and (C) are both just a little bit illogical.

In (C), the clearest issue is that the verb tense is a little bit off. "... the more coffee the doctors drank, the more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease." One problem is "would have" -- the phrase conditional, which doesn't make much sense here. We're looking at facts of a study: "the more x occurred, the more y occurred". Since these are facts, it wouldn't make sense to say: "the more x occurred, the more y would have occurred." There's simply no need to make the second part of the phrase conditional.

In (A), it doesn't make much sense to say "the more they had a likelihood." It makes sense to talk about the degree to which something is likely to occur: "a higher likelihood" or "a greater likelihood." But this is subtly different: (A) is saying "the more they had a likelihood" -- which seems to express "likelihood" as a binary thing, that you either have or you don't -- so now (A) seems to say that the more the physicians drank, the higher the odds of having a likelihood. And that doesn't make much sense. (C) suffers from the same problem, too.

I hope this helps!


GMATNinja, can you elaborate a little more on option A. Also, if we replace "they" with "doctors" in "more they had a likelihood of coronary disease", can we say the sentence is saying that more doctors had a likelihood that is the number of doctors ?
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
V
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3646
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jun 2020, 07:49
2
Suneha123 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
SS18, if you're being really strict and literal with the meaning here, (A) and (C) are both just a little bit illogical.

In (C), the clearest issue is that the verb tense is a little bit off. "... the more coffee the doctors drank, the more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease." One problem is "would have" -- the phrase conditional, which doesn't make much sense here. We're looking at facts of a study: "the more x occurred, the more y occurred". Since these are facts, it wouldn't make sense to say: "the more x occurred, the more y would have occurred." There's simply no need to make the second part of the phrase conditional.

In (A), it doesn't make much sense to say "the more they had a likelihood." It makes sense to talk about the degree to which something is likely to occur: "a higher likelihood" or "a greater likelihood." But this is subtly different: (A) is saying "the more they had a likelihood" -- which seems to express "likelihood" as a binary thing, that you either have or you don't -- so now (A) seems to say that the more the physicians drank, the higher the odds of having a likelihood. And that doesn't make much sense. (C) suffers from the same problem, too.

I hope this helps!


GMATNinja, can you elaborate a little more on option A. Also, if we replace "they" with "doctors" in "more they had a likelihood of coronary disease", can we say the sentence is saying that more doctors had a likelihood that is the number of doctors ?

Consider the following example:

"The more you study, the more you will have a likelihood of getting a 700."

  • This one doesn't quite make sense because you always have a likelihood of getting a 700.
  • That likelihood might increase or decrease, but you've always had some likelihood of getting a 700 -- whether that likelihood was a 0% chance, a 100% chance, or anything in between.
  • Studying doesn't increase your chances of HAVING a likelihood -- you have some likelihood regardless of how much you study.
  • Instead, studying INCREASES the likelihood that you will get a 700.

We have something similar in this question. Drinking more coffee doesn't increase the chances of HAVING a likelihood. Instead, drinking more coffee increases the likelihood of having coronary disease. And that's why (D) is better than (A).

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutors @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | YouTube | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: When going gets tough, tough gets going_GMAT2020
Joined: 05 Feb 2020
Posts: 79
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
WE: Engineering (Military & Defense)
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jun 2020, 07:25
1
[quote="LithiumIon"]A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.


(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease

(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease

(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease

(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease

(E) greater was coronary disease likely
*************************************************
more the x , greater the Y (A) (B) and (C) incorrect

(D) Correct
(E) parallelism error. drinking coffee -greater
_________________
*************Krishh*******************
It's all about dreams because they are free...
*************************************
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 02 Sep 2019
Posts: 87
Location: India
Schools: ISB'21, WBS
WE: Information Technology (Commercial Banking)
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jul 2020, 21:27
(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
Likelihood is uncountable, So usage of More is incorrect

(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
Likelihood is uncountable, So usage of More is incorrect

(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
Likelihood is uncountable, So usage of More is incorrect

(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
Compared to A,B,C, usage of Greater instead of More corrects the meaning


(E) greater was coronary disease likely
placement of likely doesn’t give the best sentence here
GMAT Club Bot
Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof   [#permalink] 20 Jul 2020, 21:27

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   [ 48 posts ] 

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne