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A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan

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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 14:16
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 03:29
Please Note - I have no doubt about the correct answer option of the bold face choice question.

Here is a question from Boldface section of the OG -

A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool company has recently claimed that the company is mismanaged, citing as evidence the company's failure to slow production in response to a recent rise in its inventory of finished products. It is doubtful whether an investor's sniping at management can ever be anything other than counterproductive, but in this case it is clearly not justified. It is true that an increased inventory of finished products often indicates that production is outstripping demand, but in Burton's case it indicates no such thing. Rather, the increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers.

In the argument given, the two boldfaced portions play which of the following roles?

(A) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second provides evidence to undermine the support for the position being opposed.
(B) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second is evidence that has been used to support the position being opposed.
(C) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second states the conclusion of the argument as a whole.
(D) The first is evidence that has been used to support a position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second provides information to undermine the force of that evidence.
(E) The first is evidence that has been used to support a position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second states the conclusion of the argument as a whole.

Again, What do you think should be the Primary Purpose for the passage written above?

IMO, it is clearly a highly opinionated passage in which the author concludes that claim by the investor is not justified. The response to the Primary Purpose question would be something like-
1-"Discarding the view point of an investor."
2-"Opposing the opinion/ judgement of an investor."

But the OG explanation says that

"The first boldfaced portion
expresses the investor’s claim that the company is mismanaged. The argument asserts, in
the second boldfaced portion, that this claim by the investor is unjustified. The passage
then goes on to support this assertion."

Does that mean that the passage is just an assertion and doesn't has any strong opinion?

So, again the OG's explanation seems contrary to my understanding about the passage as a whole. Am I missing something here?
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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 03:30
GMATNinja your suggestion would help us a lot.
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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2017, 03:36
venksune wrote:
The first is a position and second is conclusion. C rightly identifies that.


Why the conclusion of this paragraph was not "the increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers?"

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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2017, 11:37
A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool company has recently claimed that the company is mismanaged, citing as evidence the company's failure to slow production in response to a recent rise in its inventory of finished products. It is doubtful whether an investor's sniping at management can ever be anything other than counterproductive, but in this case it is clearly not justified. It is true that an increased inventory of finished products often indicates that production is outstripping demand, but in Burton's case it indicates no such thing. Rather, the increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers.

The passage starts by saying that a prominent investor CLAIMED (not a fact as it can be challenged) that “THE COMPANY IS MISMANAGED”. Why?
Comma+verb-ing answers the why. What follows citing is an evidence used to support the first bold face.

Here comes a contrast (doubtful/whether). Bold face 2 is again a conclusion. Then what comes next is information to support the second bold face.


In the argument given, the two boldfaced portions play which of the following roles?

(A) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second provides evidence to undermine the support for the position being opposed.
Second is also a conclusion.

(B) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second is evidence that has been used to support the position being opposed.
INCORRECT

(C) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second states the conclusion of the argument as a whole.
Correct

(D) The first is evidence that has been used to support a position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second provides information to undermine the force of that evidence.
First is claim (conclusion).

(E) The first is evidence that has been used to support a position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second states the conclusion of the argument as a whole.
Same as D.
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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2017, 11:43
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tringuyenminh293 wrote:
venksune wrote:
The first is a position and second is conclusion. C rightly identifies that.


Why the conclusion of this paragraph was not "the increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers?"


When stuck between what is fact and what is conclusion, always ask:
1) Can it be proved?
2) Can it be questioned/challenged?


in this case it is clearly not justified. It is true that an increased inventory of finished products often indicates that production is outstripping demand, but in Burton's case it indicates no such thing. Rather, the increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers.

1) It is CLEARLY not justified BECAUSE the increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers.

OR
2) The increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers BECAUSE it is CLEARLY not justified.

Last edited by Shiv2016 on 08 Sep 2017, 22:01, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 17:31
Thanks Shiv2016 for helpful explanation.

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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2017, 11:41
A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool company has recently claimed that the company is mismanaged, citing as evidence the company's failure to slow production in response to a recent rise in its inventory of finished products. It is doubtful whether an investor's sniping at management can ever be anything other than counterproductive, but in this case it is clearly not justified. It is true that an increased inventory of finished products often indicates that production is outstripping demand, but in Burton's case it indicates no such thing. Rather, the increase in inventory is entirely attributable to products that have already been assigned to orders received from customers.

In the argument given, the two boldfaced portions play which of the following roles?


(A) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second provides evidence to undermine the support for the position being opposed.
- BF 2 is NOT evidence!

(B) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second is evidence that has been used to support the position being opposed.
- Same as "A"

(C) The first states the position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second states the conclusion of the argument as a whole.
- correct as is

(D) The first is evidence that has been used to support a position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second provides information to undermine the force of that evidence.
- BF 1 is NOT evidence!

(E) The first is evidence that has been used to support a position that the argument as a whole opposes; the second states the conclusion of the argument as a whole.
- Same as "D"

Really easy -- you don't have to even analyze the conclusion here. Just read A/C (somewhat) carefully. Pretty straightforward to tell what "evidence" and what "claims" look like/sound like

Kudos please if you find this helpful :)

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Re: A prominent investor who holds a large stake in the Burton Tool compan   [#permalink] 16 Sep 2017, 11:41

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