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A recent court decision has qualified

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A recent court decision has qualified [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2017, 21:05
Thanks sayantanc2k.

1.Second Point understood.

But there is a confusion with the first point

The first one is correct: IF hypothetical subjunctive (simple past), THEN conditional (would).... unlikely future event.

However, in first point, I used present perfect instead of hypothetical subjunctive or simple past. Please explain how is it correct.


Ex- If she has gone through the documentation, she can start analyzing the new case.

2. I got more confused when I read mixed conditional sentences.

http://www.ef.com/english-resources/eng ... nditional/

If we had looked at the map, we wouldn't be lost.

Is it the correct usage in GMAT?


3. Often, "when" can be replaced by "if" (for first type of conditional)
(if may often be replaced by when --https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conditional_sentence)


So, when we make the sentences using "when" , we should use the rules of "if else"?

when I will go to market, I will bring fruits for you.

When I go to the market, I will bring fruits for you.

Which one of the above is correct?

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Re: A recent court decision has qualified [#permalink]

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New post 06 Feb 2017, 03:33
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AR15J wrote:
Thanks sayantanc2k.

1.Second Point understood.

But there is a confusion with the first point

The first one is correct: IF hypothetical subjunctive (simple past), THEN conditional (would).... unlikely future event.

However, in first point, I used present perfect instead of hypothetical subjunctive or simple past. Please explain how is it correct.


Ex- If she has gone through the documentation, she can start analyzing the new case.

2. I got more confused when I read mixed conditional sentences.

http://www.ef.com/english-resources/eng ... nditional/

If we had looked at the map, we wouldn't be lost.

Is it the correct usage in GMAT?


3. Often, "when" can be replaced by "if" (for first type of conditional)
(if may often be replaced by when --https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conditional_sentence)


So, when we make the sentences using "when" , we should use the rules of "if else"?

when I will go to market, I will bring fruits for you.

When I go to the market, I will bring fruits for you.

Which one of the above is correct?


1. When I mentioned "The first one is correct", I referred to the first sentence of your point 3: "If I had 10 papers, I would complete the homework". This is an example of an unlikely future event. Hence the structure IF hypothetical subjunctive (simple past), THEN conditional (would).... is alright.

Now coming to your Point 1:
If she has gone through the documentation, she can start analyzing the new case... correct.

This is not a case of unlikely future event. Hence the structure IF hypothetical subjunctive (simple past), THEN conditional (would).... is not applicable. This example states an ordinary if-then structure, in which the tenses depict their standard usage. The sentence implies:
Pre-requisite: She has (already) gone through the document.
Result if the pre-requisite is satisfied: She can start analysing.

2. If we had looked at the map, we wouldn't be lost.
The above sentence is wrong. Correct would be:
a. If we had looked at the map, we wouldn't be lost. (unlikely future event)
OR
b. If we had looked at the map, we wouldn't be have been lost. (past event that never happened)

3. "When" and "if" have two different meanings. "When" confirms that the event will happen, but "if" indicates that the event may or may not happen.

I shall meet you, when I am ready. ( implies: I shall be ready at a point of time, and when i am, I shall meet you).
I shall meet you, if I am ready. (implies: I may or may not be ready - if i am, i shall meet you.)

Coming to your sentences:
When I will go to market, I will bring fruits for you... wrong
When I go to the market, I will bring fruits for you... correct. (same structure as that of if-then)

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Re: A recent court decision has qualified [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2017, 05:02
(A) if they have been given reason to believe that their jobs will - correct
(B) if they are given reason for believing that their jobs would still - usage of would is wrong (are given)
(C) having been given reason for believing that their jobs would - usage of having being is wrong (it is used to talk about something that is over)
(D) having been given reason to believe their jobs to - same as C
(E) given reason to believe that their jobs will still - condition has been removed

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Re: A recent court decision has qualified [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 10:21
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Accurate idoims are used - A is correct.
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Re: A recent court decision has qualified [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2017, 11:49
please explain the concept behind the use of present perfect in if clause and tell the complete rule to use it(if rule+then rule)

thanks

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Re: A recent court decision has qualified   [#permalink] 23 Sep 2017, 11:49

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