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A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment

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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2016, 22:21
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2016, 15:05
I was able to arrive at the answer choice and understood the concepts tested in this question, SV Agreement and Comparisons, but
got one doubt in this question.

In the underlined portion of original sentence the entities being compared are
The economy might not be as weak
As some analysts previously thought


After doing the error analysis of the original sentence, i was looking for an option choice with the second element as "as some analysts previously thought to be"

Is there any difference if we write

As some analysts previously thought to be

or
As some analysts previously thought

Are both correct ?
Does both convey the same meaning ?
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment [#permalink]

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The idiom is "as X as Y," but this is not a comparison in the traditional sense. It's really a way of clarifying extent. The economy may be weak, but not as low as the analysts' earlier opinion would indicate. We aren't comparing the clauses "The economy might not be [as] weak" and "some analysts thought."

So, could we say "thought to be"? In short, no--that doesn't convey a clear meaning. You may be thinking of "though it to be." That would work, but the excess words aren't really needed. The shorter version is a very common English construction:

The guests were earlier than I expected.
The food was spicier than I wanted.
The experiment has produced more startling results than anyone could have predicted.

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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2016, 10:04
sahilmalhotra01 wrote:
I was able to arrive at the answer choice and understood the concepts tested in this question, SV Agreement and Comparisons, but
got one doubt in this question.

In the underlined portion of original sentence the entities being compared are
The economy might not be as weak
As some analysts previously thought


After doing the error analysis of the original sentence, i was looking for an option choice with the second element as "as some analysts previously thought to be"

Is there any difference if we write

As some analysts previously thought to be

or
As some analysts previously thought

Are both correct ?
Does both convey the same meaning ?


Hi Sahil,

Thanks for posting your query here. :-)

The phrase to be is really not needed as without this phrase also, the correct answer choice conveys the intended meaning clearly. GMAT SC prefers concise choices as they communicate the meaning clearly.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2016, 13:55
Hi!
Sub here is surge.. so its should be suggest or suggests?
reasons please.. (its a very basic question and i am unable to solve it though)
thanks
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2016, 08:19
Hi,
I narrowed down to A and C, but i eliminated A and chose C without considered about its tense and SV agreement.
This is my reasoning for A:
I understood that the sentence convey that the economy not weak as it is thought by analyst. But when i saw "the economy might not be as weak as some analysts previously thought", i assumed that "the economy" parallel with "some analysts" because i saw it apear immediately after "as weak as".
Can anyone throw me some light to avoid this mistake later? Thanks in advance.
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2016, 08:42
Celestial09 wrote:
Hi!
Sub here is surge.. so its should be suggest or suggests?
reasons please.. (its a very basic question and i am unable to solve it though)
thanks


Subject here is not surge but a surge and a drop. So, since the subject is plural it should have plural verb suggest.
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2016, 23:52
A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as some analysts previously thought.

A. claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as some analysts previously thought
B. claims suggests that the economy might not be so weak as some analysts have previously thought
C. claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as have been previously thought by some analysts
D. claims, suggesting about the economy that it might not be so weak as previously thought by some analysts
E. claims, suggesting the economy might not be as weak as previously thought to be by some analysts
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2016, 06:08
A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as some analysts previously thought.

A. claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as some analysts previously thought
B. claims suggests that the economy might not be so weak as some analysts have previously thought - Subject Verb agreement issue
C. claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as have been previously thought by some analysts - Subject Verb agreement issue and Tense issue
D. claims, suggesting about the economy that it might not be so weak as previously thought by some analysts - Not a sentence
E. claims, suggesting the economy might not be as weak as previously thought to be by some analysts - Not a sentence

Answer A
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A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment [#permalink]

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Please kindly help!

I'm having a headache with this question, so expert please help me to sort out the 2 questions below:

1. Regarding the option "as weak as analyst previously thought". This structure is very clear. I can say it is a short form of: The economy is not as weak as analysts previously thought <It was>.

However, regarding the phrase "as previously thought by analyst", what was thought by analyst here? Is it a "virtual idea" like the experts in beatthegmat and magoosh said or "the economy" like some replies from experts above?

If it is "the economy", how can we recover the long, full form of the sentence? Is it "the economy is not as weak as the economy, which was thought by analyst", which I think grammatically incorrect because we can not say that "the economy was thought by analyst"or in active form "analyst thought the economy". Should it be " As previously thought about by analyst" or "as previously thought to be by analyst", so that when we recover the full clause, it is more natural?. Don't mention about wordiness or something, I just want to find the grammar structure here.

If it is a virtual "idea", then the full clause is "the economy is not as weak as the idea, which was previously thought by analysts". The sentence is now very awkward.

2. In beatgmat forum, the expert said we need to include "was" to the sentence to make it a correct passive form (as was previously thought by analyst). I disagree because it's unnecessary to have "was" in the sentence. Am I wrong?
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A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2016, 10:17
gomax1199 wrote:
Please kindly help!

I'm having a headache with this question, so expert please help me to sort out the 2 questions below:


1. Regarding the option "as weak as analyst previously thought". This structure is very clear. I can say it is a short form of: The economy is not as weak as analysts previously thought <It was>.

However, regarding the phrase "as previously thought by analyst", what was thought by analyst here? Is it a "virtual idea" like the experts in beatthegmat and magoosh said or "the economy" like some replies from experts above?

If it is "the economy", how can we recover the long, full form of the sentence? Is it "the economy is not as weak as the economy, which was thought by analyst", which I think grammatically incorrect because we can not say that "the economy was thought by analyst"or in active form "analyst thought the economy". Should it be " As previously thought about by analyst" or "as previously thought to be by analyst", so that when we recover the full clause, it is more natural?. Don't mention about wordiness or something, I just want to find the grammar structure here.

If it is a virtual "idea", then the full clause is "the economy is not as weak as the idea, which was previously thought by analysts". The sentence is now very awkward.

2. In beatgmat forum, the expert said we need to include "was" to the sentence to make it a correct passive form (as was previously thought by analyst). I disagree because it's unnecessary to have "was" in the sentence. Am I wrong?


As for your question 2, the expert's explanation is just superb - she explains perfectly why the "was" is required.

As for your question 1, consider the following:

The economy is not as weak as <it>was previously thought by the analysts. (1)

This sentence is the same as the the following except that the second clause has been made into passive:
The economy is not as weak as the analysts previously thought <it was>. (2)

The confusion arises because in the passive form (1) "it" no longer represents "economy" (as in active form (2)), but becomes placeholder "it".

It was thought by the analysts that the economy was weak. Here "it" acts as a placeholder for the whole clause that the economy was weak.

So in (1), you may think of the omitted "it" as the placeholder "it" rather than the pronoun for "economy":

You construction seems awkward because such passive voices cannot be constructed without a placeholder:
That the economy was weak was thought by the analysts...... this is awkward and hence the placeholder is used.
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2016, 16:07
Thank you so much for your reply regarding question 1, it is an eye opener for me.
Regarding question 2, since you agree with the necessity of including "was" in the sentence to make it correct - ...not as week as was thought by analysts - , you may think this one is wrong :... not as weak as thought by analysts.

However, I see a lot of sentences with this structure, especially this one: "It is not as good as expected by them". I believe this sentence is grammatically correct, even though there is not "was" in it. Can you kindly shed light on this matter?

Again, thank you very much for your answer.
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2016, 09:50
gomax1199 wrote:
Thank you so much for your reply regarding question 1, it is an eye opener for me.
Regarding question 2, since you agree with the necessity of including "was" in the sentence to make it correct - ...not as week as was thought by analysts - , you may think this one is wrong :... not as weak as thought by analysts.

However, I see a lot of sentences with this structure, especially this one: "It is not as good as expected by them". I believe this sentence is grammatically correct, even though there is not "was" in it. Can you kindly shed light on this matter?

Again, thank you very much for your answer.


No this sentence is wrong as well for the same reason.
In active voice: It is not as good as they expected.
In passive voice: It is not as good as WAS expected by them.
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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sayantanc2k wrote:
gomax1199 wrote:
Thank you so much for your reply regarding question 1, it is an eye opener for me.
Regarding question 2, since you agree with the necessity of including "was" in the sentence to make it correct - ...not as week as was thought by analysts - , you may think this one is wrong :... not as weak as thought by analysts.

However, I see a lot of sentences with this structure, especially this one: "It is not as good as expected by them". I believe this sentence is grammatically correct, even though there is not "was" in it. Can you kindly shed light on this matter?

Again, thank you very much for your answer.


No this sentence is wrong as well for the same reason.
In active voice: It is not as good as they expected.
In passive voice: It is not as good as WAS expected by them.



But I see the sentence "It is not as good as expected by..." everywhere. Having tried googling it, I see everybody use it that way.
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2016, 02:03
gomax1199 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
gomax1199 wrote:
Thank you so much for your reply regarding question 1, it is an eye opener for me.
Regarding question 2, since you agree with the necessity of including "was" in the sentence to make it correct - ...not as week as was thought by analysts - , you may think this one is wrong :... not as weak as thought by analysts.

However, I see a lot of sentences with this structure, especially this one: "It is not as good as expected by them". I believe this sentence is grammatically correct, even though there is not "was" in it. Can you kindly shed light on this matter?

Again, thank you very much for your answer.


No this sentence is wrong as well for the same reason.
In active voice: It is not as good as they expected.
In passive voice: It is not as good as WAS expected by them.



But I see the sentence "It is not as good as expected by..." everywhere. Having tried googling it, I see everybody use it that way.


The fact that everybody everywhere uses a construction in some particular way is not really a valid reasoning to determine whether that usage is correct. In fact such usages could act as traps in SC questions. If you are not convinced with the reasoning stated in the previous post then please post specifically why you differ in opinion.

[Another example of faulty construction that we see frequently is "less than 10 items" at the express counters at shopping malls. The frequent usage does not make this phrase correct - the correct usage is "fewer than 10 items". ("Less" is used for uncountable nouns, whereas "fewer" for countable.)]
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2016, 21:38
You're right. I can not find anything like "as expected" in comparison form in GMAT official materials.
Thank you

P/s: I will come back when I find one
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2016, 02:33
I am confused if "A surge in new homes..........claims" act as a phrase or juat a noun......since phrase requires a singular verb
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 31 Dec 2016, 23:44
Bhargav93 wrote:
I am confused if "A surge in new homes..........claims" act as a phrase or juat a noun......since phrase requires a singular verb


Here "claims" is a noun - the main verb is "suggest", which is plural - the main subject for this verb is the noun phrase "A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims".
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jan 2017, 18:54
A surge = singular
claims = singular
a surge and a drop = plural
suggest = plural
have been = passive voice
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Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug [#permalink]

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New post 15 Mar 2017, 20:11
Hi Expert,

I read your posts for this question and understood the sentence well. Thanks

I understand that the usage of have been in choice C is incorrect.

choice C-- claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as have been previously thought by some analysts

Just wanted to clear one doubt on eclipses.

If i write the eclipses, will the sentence be


claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as it<economy> have been previously thought by some analysts

or

claims suggest that the economy might not be as weak as it<economy> might have been previously thought by some analysts

How to determine which is the intended one?
Re: A surge in new home sales and a drop in weekly unemployment claims sug   [#permalink] 15 Mar 2017, 20:11

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