GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 10 Dec 2018, 22:56

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 11, 2018

     December 11, 2018

     09:00 PM EST

     10:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics. December 11 at 9 PM EST.
  • Free lesson on number properties

     December 10, 2018

     December 10, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 02 May 2014
Posts: 100
Schools: ESADE '16, HKU'16, SMU '16
GMAT 1: 620 Q46 V30
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Nov 2014, 04:25
According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitually stern facial expression, models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression of status and exclusivity, even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves.

models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression
models in magazine advertisements who do not smile give an impression adequately
- who incorrectly refers to the magazine advertisement.
models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression
it is the models, in magazine advertisements, who do not smile and adequately give an impression
- it is the models. Also the complete sentemce doesn't make sense.
in magazine advertisements, the models who do not smile adequately give an impression .
- Misplaced modifier

Can we please discuss options A and C ? Still not sure why A is wrong
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 05 Nov 2015
Posts: 38
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2015, 06:03
bibha wrote:
According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitually stern facial expression, models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression of status and exclusivity, even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves.

(C) 2008 GMAT Club - v04#9

models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression
models in magazine advertisements who do not smile give an impression adequately
models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression
it is the models, in magazine advertisements, who do not smile and adequately give an impression
in magazine advertisements, the models who do not smile adequately give an impression


My two cents on this even though i went for option A as well. A habitually stern facial expression cannot possibly be a smile, adequate or not. An inadequate smile is still a smile nonetheless. So "adequate" here is being used to describe the impression given by facially stern models who don't smile in advertisements.

IMO what would have been even better than option C here would go something like this "models who do not smile in magazine advertisements give an adequate impression"
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2014
Posts: 192
GMAT Date: 08-04-2015
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Dec 2015, 07:28
4
According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitually stern facial expression, models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression of status and exclusivity, even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves.

models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression
models in magazine advertisements who do not smile give an impression adequately
models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression
it is the models, in magazine advertisements, who do not smile and adequately give an impression
in magazine advertisements, the models who do not smile adequately give an impression



I got it wrong. But, I think now I understand why C is better than A.
Meaning is the main issue here. In the non-underlined part we have even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves - this implies we need some contrast in the underlined portion.

In A, adequately modifies smile, but in C, adequately modifies give.
Meaning implied by A: Although not wealthy themselves, models, who do not smile satisfactorily, give an impression of status and exclusivity.
Meaning implied by C: Although not wealthy themselves, models, who do not smile, satisfactorily give an impression of status and exclusivity.

C gives a much more logical meaning than does A. The contrast between being not wealthy and satisfactorily giving an impression of status is clear in choice C.

Thanks.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4547
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 May 2017, 07:36
Top Contributor
1
The problem with A:
1. The passage intends to say that the models who do not smile at all or who do not smile even for a second in their commercial postures adequately give a picture of elitism and exclusivity. The combining of do not smile and adequately is a water-down from the original intent. Therefore, it is wrong to say smile adequately
Grammar: adequately is an adverb as many have already noted. In most cases, adverbs modify a verb that comes after it. This is more a custom than a rule and that is the reason 'adequately give' is more appropriate. However, the more worrisome issue here is the intrusion of the prepositional phrase in between the adverb 'adequately' and the verb 'give'.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 374
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Feb 2018, 13:31
Hi mehulsayani,

Thank you for your question.

For this sentence, the most noticeable difference in each answer is the placement of the adverb "adequately." In this case, it should be modifying the verb "give," which means "adequately" needs to be placed directly before or after "give." So let's see if we can narrow down answers that put the adverb "adequately" with the wrong thing:

A: models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression
"Adequately" is modifying "smile," so this is WRONG.

B: models in magazine advertisements who do not smile give an impression adequately
"Adequately" is modifying the right thing, but it's not directly next to the word "give," so let's rule this out as WRONG too.

C: models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression
"Adequately" is next the the verb "give," which is OK, so let's keep this one for later.

D: it is the models, in magazine advertisements, who do not smile and adequately give an impression
"Adequately" is right next to the verb "give," which is OK, so let's keep this one too.

E: in magazine advertisements, the models who do not smile adequately give an impression
"Adequately" is placed directly between "smile" and "give," which makes it unclear which verb it's supposed to be tied to. Placing an adverb between two verbs is WRONG because it's unclear.

So, based on this first problem, we can rule out answers A, B, & E. Now that we're left with only two answers - C & D - let's break down which one is the better answer. What I like to do here is read through each option plugged into the original sentence:

C: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitually stern facial expression, models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression of status and exclusivity, even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves.

This is the CORRECT answer because it places the adverb "adequately" in the right place, and it is clear that it's discussing only a portion of all magazine models (just the ones who don't smile), not all of them.

D: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitually stern facial expression, it is the models, in magazine advertisements, who do not smile and adequately give an impression of status and exclusivity, even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves.

This is INCORRECT because by moving the phrase "in magazine advertisements" to between commas, it now changes the meaning. This sentence is saying that ALL models don't smile and give an impression of status and exclusivity - the fact that they're in magazine advertisements isn't important because it's between commas. We know that not ALL models do this, so it's not a true statement.
_________________

"Students study. GMAT assassins train."
Image

Image

★★★★★ GMAT Club Verified Reviews for EMPOWERgmat & Special Discount


GMAT Club Verbal Advantage EMPOWERgmat Critical Reasoning Question Pack

EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 374
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Feb 2018, 13:41
1
To better clear up the issue of which verb "adequately" is modifying for both dexerash and lotus:

The word "adequately" means "to do something well enough/okay." These two statement have totally different meanings if you move the word "adequately." Here is why it should be with "give" and not "smile":

A: models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression

This phrase translates to: models who don't smile well enough give off an impression of status and exclusivity. This doesn't really make sense. Being bad at smiling is not why they give off that impression - not smiling at all is how they do it.

C: models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression

This phrase translates to: models who don't smile at all do a good job of giving off an impression of status and exclusivity. This makes a lot more sense - it keeps the positive adverb with the positive action, not the negative one.

I hope that helps clear up why C is the better answer!
_________________

"Students study. GMAT assassins train."
Image

Image

★★★★★ GMAT Club Verified Reviews for EMPOWERgmat & Special Discount


GMAT Club Verbal Advantage EMPOWERgmat Critical Reasoning Question Pack

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 03 Mar 2018
Posts: 31
GMAT 1: 620 Q44 V31
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 May 2018, 09:22
bibha wrote:
According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitually stern facial expression, models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression of status and exclusivity, even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves.

(C) 2008 GMAT Club - v04#9

models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression
models in magazine advertisements who do not smile give an impression adequately
models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression
it is the models, in magazine advertisements, who do not smile and adequately give an impression
in magazine advertisements, the models who do not smile adequately give an impression


How can C possibly be correct?

Models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression - Here, it seems that adequately is incorrectly modifying advertisements as opposed to smile which it should be modifying in the sentence. This option is wrong.

Alternatively, Option A looks just fine to me. The other error I read here was the usage of pronoun. I may be wrong here, but when read in context, "they" doesn't seem to be ambiguous as it refers clearly to models. Advertisements can't be wealthy or influential. Can anyone explain why there is an ambiguity?
_________________

KUDOS appreciated!

Director
Director
avatar
P
Joined: 02 Oct 2017
Posts: 725
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 May 2018, 09:40
venky90

Between A and C
Intent is models adequately give an impression

Adequately here correctly refers to "give"

In A , adequately modifies smile which is not intent

Give kudos if it helps!!!

Posted from my mobile device
_________________

Give kudos if you like the post

Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 26 Aug 2016
Posts: 628
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Marketing
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V33
GMAT 2: 700 Q50 V33
GMAT 3: 730 Q51 V38
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jul 2018, 20:20
Hi daagh Sir, Bunuel,

Can you please tell me where am moving into trap in my analysis.
for question:

According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitually stern facial expression, models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression of status and exclusivity, even if they are not wealthy or influential themselves.


A. models who do not smile adequately in magazine advertisements give an impression

B. models in magazine advertisements who do not smile give an impression adequately

C. models who do not smile in magazine advertisements adequately give an impression

D. it is the models, in magazine advertisements, who do not smile and adequately give an impression

E. in magazine advertisements, the models who do not smile adequately give an impression


A converses about the models who do not smile much / enough (adequately)
C converses that the models who do not smile at all.. are enough to give an impression/ adequately GIVE ....

C changes the meaning drastically

I am still convinced the Answer should be A.
In E. the adverb Adequately can be seen ambiguous
It can either modify SMILE or it can modify GIVE

So i ruled out E.

*edited
Furthermore, In option C "they can refer to advertisements or Models. Pronoun ambiguity.

Answer IMO is A
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Apr 2018
Posts: 73
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Aug 2018, 09:32
To me, 'they' unambiguously refers to models here because it's illogical for the magazine advertisements to be 'wealthy' or 'influential' and although this is quite a tricky one, option C adequately emphasizes the intending more than option A. Very tricky one...

Posted from my mobile device
GMAT Club Bot
Re: According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual &nbs [#permalink] 31 Aug 2018, 09:32

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 30 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

According to a recent study linking high social standing to a habitual

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.