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According to a survey of graduating medical students

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New post 11 Jul 2009, 21:05
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42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

Here Plz clarify in A , B and C...
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New post 02 Apr 2014, 15:03
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kinjiGC wrote:
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges,

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

Meaning : According to a survey, MG are nearly four times more likely than OG to plan on practicing Z

Option D) “rather” doesn’t make sense. - Eliminated

Option E) “to plan to practice” there are two intents in the same sentence, making the sentence awkward – Eliminated.

I am confused for Option A/B/C.

One of the rule I follow is more should have “than”. Both A and B satisfy that rule. e-gmat, can you please point out the mistake?


Hi Kinjal,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

Option A is incorrect because "likely" is not followed by "to verb". This word is always followed by a "to verb". For example: Kinjal is likely to understand this explanation. However, in this choice what we have is "likely... in planning to practice". This is the incorrect idiom here. Now, the other idiom "more... than..." is fine. But it has been out so cleverly between this "likely" idiom that we only focus on that. There is no problem with "four times more likely" here.

Option B is also incorrect for the same reason. In fact, the "who clause" just provided additional information. The whole planning part now belongs to the "other graduates" and do not even relate to "minority graduates" in the main clause.

Option C is the correct answer as it rectifies the idiom error in Choice A. The choice says "likely... to plan on practicing".

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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New post 23 Jul 2010, 09:23
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In this sentence both "more likely than" and "as likely as" are correct but the problem is that "likely" should be followed by "to" in the sentence.


I fell for A....but the correct answer is C.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice - "likely to" is the correct idiom..."likely..... in" is incorrect

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than [are] other graduates who plan on practicing - "likely...... who" is incorrect

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as [are] other graduates to plan on practicing - "likely......to plan...." is correct
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New post 03 Aug 2010, 13:00
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Hey All,

I was asked by private message to take this one on, even though there has been plenty of great stuff written already. Here we go:

This is a comparison question, so the whole point is to make sure we're comparing the right two things, and using the correct terminology.

42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
PROBLEM: Should be "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". That's a three-fer!

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
PROBLEM: Again "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". This one doesn't ever complete, because the "who" opens up a new modifier, and we never return to the main clause.

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
PROBLEM: "Four times AS likely" and RATHER THAN implies preference, which makes no sense here. Also, it's totally unclear what's being compared.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice
PROBLEM: "for minority graduates than other graduates" makes absolutely no sense at all. Where's the comparison?

Hope that helps!

-t
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2010, 19:53
Tommy

Can I can infer that "X as likely as Y" ---> is comparing two nouns?

thanks
TommyWallach wrote:
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.
-t
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New post 04 Aug 2010, 09:51
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Hey Nusma,

Well, technically, it would be "X is Y times as likely as Z to do something". That's the full on comparison construction. But yes, the two things have to be nouns, because the verb comes after the Z (to do something).

-t
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New post 07 Aug 2010, 01:19
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey Nusma,

Well, technically, it would be "X is Y times as likely as Z to do something". That's the full on comparison construction. But yes, the two things have to be nouns, because the verb comes after the Z (to do something).

-t



Tommy,

Can u plz explain how (or if) 'more likely' can be used? Not just in this example, but in general.
e.g., is it right to say, "X is more likely to succeed than Y"?
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New post 06 Sep 2010, 12:20
Okay. Lots of questions.

Werewolf: I think I overemphasized this issue. A and B have tons of other problems, and it may be legit to say "four times more likely." However, D is definitely wrong, because it can't be four times more likely with nothing to compare to grammatically.

I also want to address Ramana's issue, which was also sent to be privately by another student. The preferred form is "plan to VERB." I don't know for certain is the correct answer choice here would be correct on the GMAT. Just know the preferred form, and that this form is also possible. I doubt you'll ever be asked to make a direct choice between the two, with no other issues to look at.

-t
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New post 06 Sep 2010, 12:22
I've done some searching, and I do think "as likely as" is definitely preferred, to the extent that it's legit to remove A and B for that reason. Phew!

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New post 26 Oct 2010, 07:52
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First of all, "more likely than" and "as likely as" are bothe correct. But "more likely that" and "as likely for" are unidiomatic. Hence we are left with A B and C

A can be ruled out because the two portions being compared by "more likely than" are not parallel. "Minority graduates" and "are other graduates". Instead it should be "minority graduates" and "other graduates".
Hence we are left with B and C

One rule to keep in mind is that infinitives are preferred when a certain action will occur in future. Hence in this case "to plan" is preferred. Also, option B compares "minority graduates" with "other graduates who plan on practicing" which is not correct.

Hence option C is the correct ans.
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New post 16 Mar 2014, 08:19
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges,

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

Meaning : According to a survey, MG are nearly four times more likely than OG to plan on practicing Z

Option D) “rather” doesn’t make sense. - Eliminated

Option E) “to plan to practice” there are two intents in the same sentence, making the sentence awkward – Eliminated.

I am confused for Option A/B/C.

One of the rule I follow is more should have “than”. Both A and B satisfy that rule. e-gmat, can you please point out the mistake?
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 14:24
Hi Shraddha,

Can you please explain the role of underlined portion below in answer choice A? Also, this underlined portion isn't present in B, does that set the comparison correctly(provided the error with who is fixed in 2nd choice)?

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

Thanks in advance :)
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New post 25 Jul 2014, 15:14
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sk5002 wrote:
Hi Shraddha,

Can you please explain the role of underlined portion below in answer choice A? Also, this underlined portion isn't present in B, does that set the comparison correctly(provided the error with who is fixed in 2nd choice)?

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

Thanks in advance :)


Hi sk5002,

In both Choice A and B, the comparison is logical and absolutely unambiguous. Presence or absence of "are" does not affect the comparison because there is nothing else in the sentences with which "minority graduates" can be compared. the only logical entity in the sentence that can be compared to "minority graduates" is "other graduates". Hence, presence or absence of "are" does not lead to any ambiguity and hence, its presence or absence is OPTIONAL but NOT INCORRECT.

For example:

Ronny is a better bowler than Roy (is). --> In this sentence, we may or may not choose to repeat the helping Verb "is" because the comparison is absolutely clear. he two compared entities in this sentence are "Ronny" and "Roy". When a sentence presents CLEAR COMPARISON, repeating the helping Verb becomes OPTIONAL as we see in this official sentence.

Repeating the helping Verb becomes mandatory when the sentence conveys AMBIGUOUS COMPARISON. For example:

Ronny is familiar with Roy longer than Ria.

This sentence presents AMBIGUOUS COMPARISON because we can interpret two comparisons here:

1. Ronny is familiar with Roy longer than is Ria. --> Entities Compared - Ronny and Ria

2. Ronny is familiar with Roy longer than with Ria. --> Entities Compared - Roy and Ria

So, if the author intends to communicate the first meaning, then he MUST repeat the helping Verb "is". In absence of this helping verb, the sentence leads to ambiguous comparison. You can also read this article on Ellipses in Comparison for more clarity on this topic: how-far-ellipsis-is-permissible-in-comparison-148973.html

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
SJ
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2014, 10:18
Regarding choice A.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

So the issue here is with "4 times more likely than are other graduates in planning"
in which the bolded should be "to plan"
But there is no comparison error right? "4 times more likely than" is just as valid as "4 times as likely as" and mean the same thing?
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
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New post 22 Jun 2015, 10:06
anaccident wrote:
Regarding choice A.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

So the issue here is with "4 times more likely than are other graduates in planning"
in which the bolded should be "to plan"
But there is no comparison error right? "4 times more likely than" is just as valid as "4 times as likely as" and mean the same thing?
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing


1) X is 4 times more likely than Y to do Z.
2) X is 4 times as likely as Y to do Z

So if Y does 1 time.
So as per 1) X does 5 times (4 times more)
But as per 2) X does 4 times (4 times of Y).

Hope it is clear.
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students  [#permalink]

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ArunpriyanJ wrote:
Maulikgmat wrote:
42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

Here Plz clarify in A , B and C...


As far as i have understood 'More likely than' is not a phrase......But 'as likely as' is a correct phrase.

experts kindly clarfiy

Thanks,
A :)


ArunpriyanJ

Gramatically, Both X times more ... than and X times as...as are correct, but they mean different.

Case 1: more...than

I have 5 chocolates more than you have.
Implication: You have x chocolates, Difference is 5. So I have x+5 chocolates

I have 5 times more chocolates than you have.
Implication: You have x chocolates. Difference is 5 times your chocolate, i.e. 5x. So I have x + 5x = 6x chocolates

Case 2: as...as

I have 5 times as many chocolates as you have.
Implication: You have x chocolates. I have 5x chocolates.

In summary: the phrase more.. than involves the mathematical operation addition, whereas the phrase as...as involves the mathematical operation multiplication.

The error happens frequently when we want to mean that I have 5x chocolates but say I have 5 times more chocolates. When I say I have 5 times more chocolates, the sentence means I have 6 times as many chocolates as explained above !!

Does this explanation make sense? :)
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New post 15 Feb 2016, 07:14
sayantanc2k wrote:
Gramatically, Both X times more ... than and X times as...as are correct, but they mean different.

In that sense, isn't the correct answer (option C) changing the meaning of the original sentence?
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New post 15 Feb 2016, 10:52
sauravpaul wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
Gramatically, Both X times more ... than and X times as...as are correct, but they mean different.

In that sense, isn't the correct answer (option C) changing the meaning of the original sentence?


sauravpaul

Yes, the choices A and C have different meanings. Nonetheless, there are major grammatical problems in the other options:

A. The idiom likely in planning is wrong; the correct usage is likely to plan.
B. The relative clause modifier who plan on practicing.....in socioeconomically deprived areas refers to other graduates, but after the clause ends the main clause should continue to express what the minority graduates are more likely to do. The main clause in the sentence takes the form: minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates - incomplete construction.
D and E are meaningless altogether.

Therefore although Option C changes the meaning of the original sentence, we have to accept it since it is the only grammatically correct option; all other options have severe errors. [....and in the process we assume that the author originally meant 4x and not +4x. :) ]

In general, please note the following:
When multiplication is meant : use X times as
When addition is meant: use more than.
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New post 10 Jul 2016, 07:32
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey All,

I was asked by private message to take this one on, even though there has been plenty of great stuff written already. Here we go:

This is a comparison question, so the whole point is to make sure we're comparing the right two things, and using the correct terminology.

42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
PROBLEM: Should be "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". That's a three-fer!

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
PROBLEM: Again "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". This one doesn't ever complete, because the "who" opens up a new modifier, and we never return to the main clause.

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
PROBLEM: "Four times AS likely" and RATHER THAN implies preference, which makes no sense here. Also, it's totally unclear what's being compared.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice
PROBLEM: "for minority graduates than other graduates" makes absolutely no sense at all. Where's the comparison?

Hope that helps!

-t


Hi,

I understand the "AS likely AS X TO" construction and why C is the best option. However is "more LIKELY than X TO" a correct construction as well ? ( Which is not a part of the options right now)
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2016, 15:10
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sgrover18 wrote:
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey All,

I was asked by private message to take this one on, even though there has been plenty of great stuff written already. Here we go:

This is a comparison question, so the whole point is to make sure we're comparing the right two things, and using the correct terminology.

42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
PROBLEM: Should be "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". That's a three-fer!

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
PROBLEM: Again "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". This one doesn't ever complete, because the "who" opens up a new modifier, and we never return to the main clause.

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
PROBLEM: "Four times AS likely" and RATHER THAN implies preference, which makes no sense here. Also, it's totally unclear what's being compared.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice
PROBLEM: "for minority graduates than other graduates" makes absolutely no sense at all. Where's the comparison?

Hope that helps!

-t


Hi,

I understand the "AS likely AS X TO" construction and why C is the best option. However is "more LIKELY than X TO" a correct construction as well ? ( Which is not a part of the options right now)


For multiplication, "as .... as" is used.
For addition, "more.... than" is used.

The reason is as follows:

Consider the following statement:
I have 5 more books than you have.
This implies that the difference between my books and your books is 5. If you have x books, I have x+5 books.

Now take this statement:
I have 5 times more books than you have.
This implies that the difference between my books and your books is 5x. If you have x books, I have x + 5x books, i.e. 6x books. Thus if the meaning intended is that I have 5x books, then the sentence is wrong. The correct sentence then would be:

I have 5 times as many books as you do.
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