GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 07 Jul 2020, 17:57

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Sep 2018
Posts: 81
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 May 2019, 00:32
daagh Please could you elaborate on option B.

I agree that "working outside the home" should modify the mothers and not children. But I am not confident on the error analysis of "who worked outside"

According to me, one-third of mothers (with young children) who worked outside is grammatically correct because the "with young children" is additional information describing the mothers. So technically the relative pronoun "who" could jump the extra information to describe the preceding noun.

My reason of eliminating option B was the usage of "those mothers" in the second clause. I assumed "those" illogical refers to the 1975 mothers while technically it should refer to "mothers with young children"

Please let me know your views on this
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Jan 2019
Posts: 4
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Jun 2019, 06:15
EducationAisle egmat

Can't modifiers "who" and verb-ing jump over adjective modifier "with young children"?

I know that these modifiers first have to modify young children and if it doesn't make sense then they can jump over. I would argue that modifying "young children" doesn't make sense so these modifiers can jump over and modify mothers.

From the discussion, it seems these modifiers can't jump over because it makes sense for these modifiers to modify "children"?

If the sentence was - mothers with glasses who worked outside/working outside...

So here it would jump over because "who" or "working" doesn't make ANY sense modifying glasses?

Also are all the above mentioned rules applicable to verb-ed modifiers?

Thank you
SVP
SVP
User avatar
D
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 1917
Location: India
Schools: ISB
GPA: 3.31
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Jun 2019, 08:18
who can definitely jump over a prepositional phrase. However, we need to realize that this is not an ideal situation.

Hence, C is a better construct in this regard (in addition to other issues with B that have been discussed earlier in this thread).
_________________
Thanks,
Ashish
GMAT-99th Percentile, MBA - ISB Hyderabad
EducationAisle Online GMAT Classes

Sentence Correction Nirvana available on Amazon.in and Flipkart

Join us for a free GMAT Live Online Class from anywhere in the world
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Dec 2018
Posts: 40
According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jul 2019, 06:54
GMATNinja wrote:
Rahul0028 wrote:
Could someone help me out with this?

Option C - "...one-third of mothers with young children worked outside the home..". The participle "worked" seems to again modify the young children and not the mother. Why is this considered correct but on the contrary using "working" makes it incorrect.

In (C) "worked" isn't a participle - it's the main verb of the clause. "In 1975 about one-third of mothers with young children worked outside the home." If we removed "worked" we clearly wouldn't have a complete sentence anymore. The "young children" are part of the prepositional phrase describing the mothers, and therefore cannot do double-duty as the subject of "worked" as well. (If you like jargon: the more technical way of saying this is that a noun cannot both be the object of a prepositional phrase and the main subject of the sentence.) It has to be the mothers who worked. So there's no ambiguity - or violation of child labor laws - here.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja/Other Experts
I used the following reasoning, apparently part of it from one of your post on a similar question perhaps, kindly englighten if it's correct.
A, B:"those mothers" is wrong as the same mothers are not the part of the two census in albeit two years mentioned
D, E: these two sentences are "run-on" as neither [color=#ff0000]"even though"
or "with" is a subordinator (if, unless, although, after, before, so on, so that, although, because) nor a [FANBOYS]

Moreover parallelism is also a problem in these options
A,E: "working" is not parallel with "were employed"
B, D: "who worked" is not parallel with "were employed", it must be "who were employed"

Also, the usage of "with" in E is not justified.

I was unable to see the reasoning of children working or mother working in my first glance.
[/color]
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
V
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3572
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2019, 13:20
2
MAnkur wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Rahul0028 wrote:
Could someone help me out with this?

Option C - "...one-third of mothers with young children worked outside the home..". The participle "worked" seems to again modify the young children and not the mother. Why is this considered correct but on the contrary using "working" makes it incorrect.

In (C) "worked" isn't a participle - it's the main verb of the clause. "In 1975 about one-third of mothers with young children worked outside the home." If we removed "worked" we clearly wouldn't have a complete sentence anymore. The "young children" are part of the prepositional phrase describing the mothers, and therefore cannot do double-duty as the subject of "worked" as well. (If you like jargon: the more technical way of saying this is that a noun cannot both be the object of a prepositional phrase and the main subject of the sentence.) It has to be the mothers who worked. So there's no ambiguity - or violation of child labor laws - here.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja/Other Experts
I used the following reasoning, apparently part of it from one of your post on a similar question perhaps, kindly englighten if it's correct.
A, B:"those mothers" is wrong as the same mothers are not the part of the two census in albeit two years mentioned
D, E: these two sentences are "run-on" as neither [color=#ff0000]"even though"
or "with" is a subordinator (if, unless, although, after, before, so on, so that, although, because) nor a [FANBOYS]

Moreover parallelism is also a problem in these options
A,E: "working" is not parallel with "were employed"
B, D: "who worked" is not parallel with "were employed", it must be "who were employed"

Also, the usage of "with" in E is not justified.

I was unable to see the reasoning of children working or mother working in my first glance.
[/color]

Your reasoning for eliminating (A) and (B) is perfect - nice work!

Your reasoning for (D) and (E) isn't valid. "Even though" can link two clauses, so (D) isn't a run-on. "Even though John purchased nearly every toy in the store, his infant executed a successful coup when John returned home without any organic cheese bunnies." (Yes, organic cheese bunnies are a thing.)

And in (E) there's only one clause, so there's no run-on sentence.

Better to eliminate these options because their meanings are illogical - both make it sound as though the children are working outside the home, rather than their mothers.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutors @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | YouTube | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Dec 2018
Posts: 40
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2019, 18:59
Thanks as always! I could relate to the logical meaning highlighted. But can below reasoning as pointed earlier is valid and can be re-used elsewhere if not in this question.

Just one more doubt, is the parallelism reasoning valid?
A,E: working not parallel with were employed
B, D: who worked is not parallel with were employed, it must be who were employed for being parallel

I guess "with" in E suppose to imply if the US consensus data posses something and is thereby incorrect.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
V
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3572
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Jul 2019, 13:56
MAnkur wrote:
Thanks as always! I could relate to the logical meaning highlighted. But can below reasoning as pointed earlier is valid and can be re-used elsewhere if not in this question.

Just one more doubt, is the parallelism reasoning valid?
A,E: working not parallel with were employed
B, D: who worked is not parallel with were employed, it must be who were employed for being parallel

I guess "with" in E suppose to imply if the US consensus data posses something and is thereby incorrect.

As discussed in this post and in this post and this video, parallelism is only relevant if you have some sort of trigger (i.e. "and", "or", etc.) that indicates a list (of verbs, nouns, modifiers, etc.) -- and we don't have any triggers that would indicate parallelism with those particular phrases.

Take a look at (B), for example: "who worked" and "were employed" aren't even in the same clause, so there's no reason why you would need them to be parallel.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutors @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | YouTube | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 10 Sep 2013
Posts: 347
Location: India
Schools: Sloan '22, UVA Darden
GMAT 1: 720 Q50 V38
GPA: 4
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Oct 2019, 07:36
1
GMATNinja daagh egmat.

Does "those mothers" refer to the set of mothers we discussed about in 1975? Shouldnt "they" be used for same entries and "those" be used for different set of people?

For example,
students studying arts are smarter than those studying science. - Here those refers to another set of students.
Students are more happy when they study science than when they study arts. - Here "They" refers to the same set of students.

So I believe that "those" is correctly used in B. Can you share your opinions?
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 1745
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2019, 00:02
4
ArtVandaley

That move only works when "those" is modified in a different way. For instance, you contrasted students studying arts with those studying science. In B, by contrast, we have the phrase "those mothers," which creates an explicit reference to the same group of mothers from the first half of the sentence.

Note also that the first part doesn't make sense. We can't say "there were about one-third of mothers with young children who worked outside the home." First, it doesn't mean anything to say "There were one-third" (even if we ignore the plural verb). There are always THREE thirds of any group, so saying that one third simply existed doesn't have any useful meaning. We then modify "mothers with young children" with "who worked outside the home." It doesn't clearly modify "one-third," but rather "mothers with young children." We might let the modifier jump over "children" to "mothers," but not all the way to "one-third." Compare to these examples:

WRONG: There are one-third of Americans who support the president.
RIGHT: One third of Americans support the president.
WRONG: There were half of professors of education in the United States without doctorates.
RIGHT: Half of the professors of education in the United States did not have doctorates.
_________________

Dmitry Farber | Manhattan Prep GMAT Instructor | San Diego


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 10 Sep 2013
Posts: 347
Location: India
Schools: Sloan '22, UVA Darden
GMAT 1: 720 Q50 V38
GPA: 4
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2019, 01:08
You are absolutely right. Thanks

Didnt realise that who modifier should modify one-third and not mothers. Elegant explanation:-)


DmitryFarber wrote:
ArtVandaley

That move only works when "those" is modified in a different way. For instance, you contrasted students studying arts with those studying science. In B, by contrast, we have the phrase "those mothers," which creates an explicit reference to the same group of mothers from the first half of the sentence.

Note also that the first part doesn't make sense. We can't say "there were about one-third of mothers with young children who worked outside the home." First, it doesn't mean anything to say "There were one-third" (even if we ignore the plural verb). There are always THREE thirds of any group, so saying that one third simply existed doesn't have any useful meaning. We then modify "mothers with young children" with "who worked outside the home." It doesn't clearly modify "one-third," but rather "mothers with young children." We might let the modifier jump over "children" to "mothers," but not all the way to "one-third." Compare to these examples:

WRONG: There are one-third of Americans who support the president.
RIGHT: One third of Americans support the president.
WRONG: There were half of professors of education in the United States without doctorates.
RIGHT: Half of the professors of education in the United States did not have doctorates.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 13 Apr 2019
Posts: 240
Location: India
Schools: Kellogg '22
GMAT 1: 710 Q49 V36
GPA: 3.85
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2020, 19:12
GMATNinja wrote:
MAnkur wrote:
Thanks as always! I could relate to the logical meaning highlighted. But can below reasoning as pointed earlier is valid and can be re-used elsewhere if not in this question.

Just one more doubt, is the parallelism reasoning valid?
A,E: working not parallel with were employed
B, D: who worked is not parallel with were employed, it must be who were employed for being parallel

I guess "with" in E suppose to imply if the US consensus data posses something and is thereby incorrect.

As discussed in this post and in this post and this video, parallelism is only relevant if you have some sort of trigger (i.e. "and", "or", etc.) that indicates a list (of verbs, nouns, modifiers, etc.) -- and we don't have any triggers that would indicate parallelism with those particular phrases.

Take a look at (B), for example: "who worked" and "were employed" aren't even in the same clause, so there's no reason why you would need them to be parallel.

I hope that helps!


GMATNinja VeritasKarishma in b and d, is who modifying children or is it jumping over children to modify mothers.
Please help!
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 26 Jun 2013
Posts: 73
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, International Business
GMAT 1: 590 Q42 V29
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2020, 19:53
D and C are close but C wins as D has incorrect modifier which mentions "..children who worked.." changing the meaning of sentence

Posted from my mobile device
_________________
Remember, if it is a GMAT question, it can be simplified elegantly.
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10646
Location: Pune, India
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Feb 2020, 22:50
1
Aviral1995 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
MAnkur wrote:
Thanks as always! I could relate to the logical meaning highlighted. But can below reasoning as pointed earlier is valid and can be re-used elsewhere if not in this question.

Just one more doubt, is the parallelism reasoning valid?
A,E: working not parallel with were employed
B, D: who worked is not parallel with were employed, it must be who were employed for being parallel

I guess "with" in E suppose to imply if the US consensus data posses something and is thereby incorrect.

As discussed in this post and in this post and this video, parallelism is only relevant if you have some sort of trigger (i.e. "and", "or", etc.) that indicates a list (of verbs, nouns, modifiers, etc.) -- and we don't have any triggers that would indicate parallelism with those particular phrases.

Take a look at (B), for example: "who worked" and "were employed" aren't even in the same clause, so there's no reason why you would need them to be parallel.

I hope that helps!


GMATNinja VeritasKarishma in b and d, is who modifying children or is it jumping over children to modify mothers.
Please help!


In (B) and (D), who is modifying 'young children'. That is not correct. The sentence clearly implies that we are talking about mothers who work outside.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 04 Nov 2019
Posts: 1
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Mar 2020, 07:06
How can you be so sure that the sentence is not trying to establish any relationship between the two clauses??
I mean, almost every answer choice is trying to do so!

anox wrote:
According to United States census data, while there was about one-third of mothers with young children working outside the home in 1975, in 2000, almost two-thirds of those mothers were employed outside the home.

Issue: Construction

Analysis:
1. The sentence presents two data points without trying to establish any causal relationship between them. Hence, the use of "while..", "even though..." and "with..." is incorrect.
2. Also, pay close attentions to various modifiers that changes the meaning of the sentence in one way or another.


A. while there was about one-third of mothers with young children working outside the home in 1975, in 2000, almost two-thirds of those mothers were employed outside the home.
- "while" unnecessarily tries to establish relationship between two facts
- "was" does not agree with plural subject "mothers"
- "those mothers" nonsensically refers mothers in 1975 as against mothers with children


B. there were about one-third of mothers with young children who worked outside the home in 1975; in 2000, almost two-thirds of those mothers were employed outside the home
- "those mothers" nonsensically refers mothers in 1975 as against mothers with children
- "young children who worked outside" incorrectly suggests that children were working outside rather than their mothers


C. in 1975 about one-third of mothers with young children worked outside the home; in 2000, almost two-thirds of such mothers were employed outside the home
- Concise sentence with comparable structure; structure "in 1975, about 1/3rd mothers worked outside; in 2000, almost 2/3rd mothers were employed outside";

D. even though in 1975 there were about one-third of mothers with young children who worked outside the home, almost two-thirds of such mothers were employed outside the home in 2000
- "even though" unnecessarily tries to establish relationship between two facts
- "young children who worked" incorrectly suggests that children were working outside rather than their mothers


E. with about one-third of mothers with young children working outside the home in 1975, almost two-thirds of such mothers were employed outside the home in 2000 answer
- "with" unnecessarily tries to establish relationship between two facts
- "young children working outside" incorrectly suggests that children were working outside rather than their mothers


Answer: C.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Jun 2018
Posts: 27
Location: India
Schools: ISB
WE: Corporate Finance (Retail Banking)
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 May 2020, 09:52
DevS93 wrote:
I had one issue with answer choice C.

From my knowledge a semicolon is used to separate two independent clauses, which can stand alone.

In choice C however after the semi colon the words 'two-thirds of such mothers' is relating this clause back to the first clause and therefore is not independent.

Could someone please explain the gap in my understanding.

Thanks in advance !!

I have the same question can any of the experts chip in. please!
SVP
SVP
User avatar
D
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 1917
Location: India
Schools: ISB
GPA: 3.31
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 May 2020, 21:35
1
abhish27 wrote:
DevS93 wrote:
I had one issue with answer choice C.

From my knowledge a semicolon is used to separate two independent clauses, which can stand alone.

In choice C however after the semi colon the words 'two-thirds of such mothers' is relating this clause back to the first clause and therefore is not independent.

Could someone please explain the gap in my understanding.

Thanks in advance !!

I have the same question can any of the experts chip in. please!

Hi! Merely the presence of such does not make a clause dependent.

Let's look at another construct:

Peter is hard-working. He will surely succeed in life.

Is the clause He will surely succeed in life a dependent clause because he in this clause refers to Peter in the previous clause? No.

The entire point about Independent clauses is that they can stand on their own, as complete sentences; of course content in one Independent clause may refer to content in another Independent clause (the way he is referring to Peter in another clause).

There are largely two ways in which dependent clauses are formed:
i) Using subordinate conjunctions (because/until/although etc.)
ii) Using relative pronouns (which/that/who/whom etc.)

You can watch our video for a quick introduction to Independent and Dependent clauses .

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Independent and Dependent clauses, their application and examples in significant detail. If you or someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
_________________
Thanks,
Ashish
GMAT-99th Percentile, MBA - ISB Hyderabad
EducationAisle Online GMAT Classes

Sentence Correction Nirvana available on Amazon.in and Flipkart

Join us for a free GMAT Live Online Class from anywhere in the world
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 28 Jan 2017
Posts: 402
According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 28 May 2020, 23:25
Dear DmitryFarber GMATGuruNY AjiteshArun MartyTargetTestPrep VeritasPrepHailey,

Is "those mothers" in choice A. wrong because that phrase refers to mothers in the past?

What's the difference in meaning between "those mothers" in choice A. and "such mothers" in choice C.?
_________________
Thank you in advance! :please :please :please

Originally posted by varotkorn on 13 May 2020, 06:42.
Last edited by varotkorn on 28 May 2020, 23:25, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
S
Joined: 20 Aug 2017
Posts: 46
Reviews Badge
According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 May 2020, 09:31
Hi ChiranjeevSingh, Skywalker18, egmat, TheEconomistGMAT, GMATNinjaTwo GMATNinja generis hazelnut mikemcgarry

In the below options could you please confirm whether "working" and "who worked" highlighted below correctly refers to "one-third of mothers with young children"?

A) while there was about one-third of mothers with young children working outside the home in 1975, in 2000, almost two-thirds of those mothers were employed outside the home

(B) there were about one-third of mothers with young children who worked outside the home in 1975; in 2000, almost two-thirds of those mothers were employed outside the home

P.S-In some posts it is mentioned that both are ostensibly wrong and modify children, but in some it is also mentioned that they could refer to mothers but not to complete" one-third of mothers".
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 1745
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2020, 23:35
1
varotkorn

SUCH mothers = the kind of mothers mentioned before
THOSE mothers = the EXACT SAME mothers mentioned before (the ones from 1975!)

The word "those" can work differently when we add a modifier. For instance, if I say "the teachers in our city earn more money than those in most large US cities," then THOSE refers only to TEACHERS, and we apply the modifier that follows (in most large US cities). But if I say "The teachers at my elementary school were paid well, but THOSE TEACHERS were more highly-trained than the average teacher," then THOSE TEACHERS is referring specifically to the teachers at my elementary school at the time in question.
_________________

Dmitry Farber | Manhattan Prep GMAT Instructor | San Diego


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews
GMAT Club Bot
Re: According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir   [#permalink] 28 May 2020, 23:35

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 39 posts ] 

According to United States census data, while there was about one-thir

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne