GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 13 Nov 2019, 02:11

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Admissions Consulting Updates from Veritas Prep

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
SAT Tip of the Week: The Importance of “Stepping Back”  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Feb 2016, 18:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: The Importance of “Stepping Back”
Image
When you’re taking the SAT, it’s easy to get lost in the moment concentrating on the test. You’re so focused on doing well, answering all the questions, double checking your work, and staying within the time limits that it’s easy to neglect thinking about the ways to actually be successful on the test.

One way I’ve found to make sure I don’t get distracted from my purpose is to consciously take a second to pause and remind myself that I know how this standardized test works. The SAT is standardized, which means it always operates in the same way; I “step back” to use that knowledge to my advantage.

Not really sure what I’m saying? Let me explain. So right now, as I’m writing this article, I am fully aware that there is always only one right answer on each SAT question. I’m aware that the answers to reading passages always have direct evidence from the text. I’m aware that all SAT math questions can be solved using uncomplicated math. But when I actually take a test, sometimes the pressure gets to me and I forget these vital tips. I’ll agonize over two different answers I think might be right, or I’ll find myself using calculus to try to solve a problem. When you’re desperate for points, things like this can happen.

To solve this problem, I need to consciously extricate myself from the pressures of the test and take a deep breath, remembering that the SAT has to follow certain rules every time. This is what I mean by “stepping back.” Once you “step back,” you’ll likely see a flaw in your thinking that was causing you to mess up on the problem in the first place. Maybe you’ll notice an assumption you were making about the passage, and now that you’re clearheaded and can remember that assumptions should not be made on the SAT, you’ll see that only one of the answers is justifiable in the passage.

It might seem scary to do this process, since taking a pause mid-test could cost you precious time. In reality, that is far from the truth – stepping back only takes a few seconds and will allow you to clear your mind, thereby eliminating time wasted agonizing over tough problems.

The SAT is not a test that you will do well on if you aren’t aware of what kind of test it is. The SAT is a standardized test that has to operate by certain rules and principles – it’s easy to forget this when your whole mind seems focused on how to fix a comma splice. Taking a moment to remember what you have to do is a valuable exercise that will help maintain a useful perspective on the test day.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

By Aidan Calvelli.

The post SAT Tip of the Week: The Importance of “Stepping Back” appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
What is a “Good” Weakness to Put in Your MBA Application?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Feb 2016, 20:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: What is a “Good” Weakness to Put in Your MBA Application?
Image
“What are your weaknesses?”

Most MBA applicants find this to be the most difficult question to answer.

As professionals and entrepreneurs, we are trained to put our best foot forward in order to sell our businesses and ourselves. We think and rehearse how to best present our strengths, while hardly spending any time considering our weaknesses. Understandably, addressing this question during one’s MBA application essay or interview usually proves to be quite a challenge.

Asked to identify his weaknesses, a typical MBA applicant will ask him or herself two questions:

1) What should I avoid mentioning?

Everyone worries about giving an answer that will reveal a fatal flaw to the admissions committee and hurt one’s chances at being admitted to an MBA program. Thus, a frequent mistake is to answer this question using a fake weakness – saying something like, “I am too smart,” or, “I work too effectively,” does not really answer the question and will just irritate your audience. Presenting yourself as unrealistically perfect will also diminish the genuine strengths you have, and create doubt in the accomplishments you have discussed throughout the essays or the interview, as it makes you appear incapable of an honest self-assessment.

Another similar no-no is to blame somebody else for your weakness. Do not attribute a weakness solely to your work environment, personal circumstances, or ethnicity – this comes across as a reckless generalization and will not add any value to your case. It will also only shift the conversation into a negative tone and counter the strong, optimistic vibe that you want to be associated with.

2) What exactly are they looking for?

Admissions committees are looking for applicants who will greatly benefit from attending their school’s MBA program, and who can contribute to the experience of other MBA participants. Using this as a guide, the weakness question should be used to demonstrate character traits of self-awareness, ability to learn from failures, and open-mindedness to effectively use feedback and criticism.

An applicant should identify specific skills and knowledge gaps that he or she will need to work on in order to reach her post MBA goals – ideally, specifics of the target MBA program in terms of courses, culture, or community should be matched to these potential growth areas.

Executing this answer properly will put forth an honest reflection that shows genuine interest in a school’s MBA program and convinces the admissions committee that the applicant has really researched the school’s offering. Effectively demonstrating your potential to gain from, and contribute to, an MBA program through your personal story will help convince the admission committee of your fit with their school. Filling in details of how you have addressed your identified weakness or how you are in the process of doing so will also help show how proactive you are, and how you will greatly benefit from this particular MBA program.

A final tip: whenever you are asked about strengths and weaknesses in one question, whether in an essay or an interview, you must allocate time and space as evenly as possible between talking about the two. Most applicants spend 2/3 or more of the space they are given for strengths leaving little room to develop the weakness portion of the answer. This type of answer will look like it was just glossed over, and that the question was not answered adequately – it will also not allow you to make a proper case as to why you will benefit from the program.

A good answer to the “weakness” question strengthens your case to be admitted to your target MBA program even as you identify a real weakness. Skillfully weaving stories of your personal experiences, self-reflection, and vision through discussion of this weakness will make your profile unique and compelling to the admissions committee.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Written by Edison Cu, a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for INSEAD.

The post What is a “Good” Weakness to Put in Your MBA Application? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Underrepresented Minorities Earning Less After Business School  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Underrepresented Minorities Earning Less After Business School
Image
While many top business schools have made a major push to improve the opportunities for underrepresented minorities in their programs, the impacts have not been seen when it comes to salary after business school. A recent study by Bloomberg of nearly 13 thousand business school alumni from more than 100 schools concluded that white, Asian, and male MBAs are seeing far more rewards from business school than the rest of their peers.

In this survey, Bloomberg asked participants what they were earning immediately after business school and then what their salary was eight years later. Black, Hispanic and American Indian MBAs were making around the same as their white and Asian peers right after school – about $105,000 – but eight years later, the same black, Hispanic and American Indian MBAs were making around $150,000, while their white and Asian colleagues were making $172,000. Female MBA grads are in an even worse place: black, Hispanic and American Indian women were earning $132,000 eight years after school, but white and Asian men were making $181,000.

Perhaps most surprising is that the problem is even bigger when looking at the most elite business schools. At Harvard Business School, black, Hispanic and American Indian students started out earning $5,000 less than their counterparts after graduation. Eight years after school, that gap rose to almost $100,000. At Columbia Business School the eight-year gap is $80,000; at Wharton, it’s $65,000.

Obviously, companies should be ensuring that they are paying equal salaries for equal work. While schools can’t force companies to do this, there are some things business schools could do to help the situation. One step would be to create strong alumni programs for underrepresented minorities. Part of the reason for salaries dropping after a few years of employment is because people become comfortable in their job and stop looking to move to a new company, a new company that might pay a higher salary to attract talent. Strengthening alumni programs for minorities that create networking opportunities, highlight potential new jobs, and keep skills fresh can make it easier for them to switch jobs, thereby raising the average salary.

Schools could also encourage companies recruiting on campus to make sure their pay packages are the same no matter the student’s sex or race. While it would be impossible for schools to force companies to comply, they could provide education to companies on the importance of equal pay and potentially punish offenders by not allowing them to recruit on campus in the future.

An even greater step would be asking companies that want to recruit on campus for a diversity report that shows what the companies are doing to make up the salary difference. MBA programs could publish this information to students, who could then use that information in their future recruiting process to figure out what companies they want to target.

While there are no quick fixes to this problem, and it is probably an issue that is far bigger than just business school, business schools should be taking some steps to do what they can to erase the salary difference.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions ProfileEvaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

The post Underrepresented Minorities Earning Less After Business School appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
GMAT Tip of the Week: Marco Rubio, Repetition, and Sentence Correction  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Feb 2016, 17:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: Marco Rubio, Repetition, and Sentence Correction
Image
Let’s dispel with the fiction that Marco Rubio doesn’t know what he’s doing on Sentence Correction problems. He knows exactly what he’s doing. In his memorable New Hampshire debate performance this past week, Rubio famously delivered the same 25-second speech several times, even in direct response to Chris Christie’s accusation that Rubio only speaks in memorized 25-second speech form.

In doing so, he likely cost himself delegates in New Hampshire and perhaps even cost himself the election (was this his Rick Perry “I can’t remember the third thing” or Howard Dean “Hi-yaaaah!” moment?), but he also provided you with a critical Sentence Correction strategy:

Find what you do well, and keep doing it over and over until you just can’t do it anymore.

This strategy manifests itself in two ways on GMAT Sentence Correction problems:

1) Look for primary Decision Points first.

Rubio came into the debate with one strong talking point, and his first inclination – regardless of the question – was to go straight to that point. On Sentence Correction problems, that is the single most important thing you can do. Much like a debate moderator, the GMAT testmaker will try to get you “off message” by offering you several decisions you could make. And often the decision that comes first is one you’re just not good at, or that actually isn’t a good differentiator. For example, you may think you need to decide between:

“…so realistic as to…” vs. “…so realistic that it…”

“…not unlike…” vs. “…like…”

“…all things antique…” vs. “…all antique things…”

And in any of those cases, you might find that both expressions are actually correct; those are differences between answer choices, but they’re not the difference between correct and incorrect. Idiomatic differences, changes in word choice, etc. may seem to beg your attention, but like Marco Rubio, you should head into each question with your list of points you want to address: modifiers, verbs, pronouns, parallel structure, etc. Look for those primary decision points first and attack them until you’ve exhausted them. Nearly always, you’ll find that doing so eliminates enough answer choices that you never have to deal with the trickier, more obscure, and often irrelevant differences between choices.

Approach each Sentence Correction problem with your scripted and heavily-practiced Decision Points in mind first. Sentence Correction is a task tailor-made for Rubio-bots.

2) Once you identify an error, stay on message as long as you can.

Rubio’s strategy backfired, but that doesn’t mean that it was a poor strategy to begin with – in fact, it’s one that will immensely help you on Sentence Correction problems. He identified a message that resonated, and he decided to do that until he was – quite literally – forced to do something else. This is a critical Sentence Correction tactic: if you find a particular error (say, an illogical modifier), you should then hold each answer choice up to that standard checking for the same error. Nearly always, if you find an error in one answer choice that same type of error will appear in at least one more.

Don’t treat each individual answer choice as a “unique snowflake” that you’ve never seen before. If there’s a verb tense / timeline error in choice B, then immediately scan C, D, and E checking those verb tenses and quickly eliminating any choices with a problem.

For example, consider the problem:

The economic report released today by Congress and the Federal Reserve was bleaker than expected, which suggests that the nearing recession might be even deeper and more prolonged than even the most pessimistic analysts have predicted.

(A) which suggests that the nearing recession might be even deeper and more prolonged than even the most pessimistic analysts have predicted.

(B) which suggests that the nearing recession might be deeper and more prolonged than that predicted by even the most pessimistic analysts.

(C) suggests that the nearing recession might be even deeper and more prolonged than that predicted by even the most pessimistic analysts.

(D) suggesting that the nearing recession might be deeper and more prolonged than that predicted by even the most pessimistic analysts.

(E) a situation that is even more deep and prolonged than even the most pessimistic analysts have predicted.

If you’re attacking this problem like a Rubio-bot, you’ll notice before you ever look at the sentence that the answer choices supply different modifiers. A and B use the relative modifier “which,” D uses the participial phrase “suggesting,” and E uses an appositive “a situation.” Noticing that, you should begin reading the sentence with that Modifier talking point in mind.

When you realize that “which” is used incorrectly in A, you don’t need to read the rest of B to see that it makes the exact same mistake. Since the sentence calls for a modifier (the portion before the comma and underlined is a complete sentence on its own, so the role of the underlined section is to further describe) and the only correct modifier in this situation is the participial “suggesting,” you can eliminate three answer choices (A, B, and E) just with that one Decision Point and quickly arrive at the correct answer, D.

More importantly, remember the overarching strategy: before you attack any Sentence Correction problem, know the grounds upon which you’re hoping to attack it – have your primary Decision Points in mind before you’re ever asked the question. And then when you do find one of those Decision Points that you can use, repeat it ad nauseum until it no longer applies.

Let’s dispel with the fiction that Marco Rubio doesn’t know what he’s doing when he repeats the same talking point over and over again; he knows exactly what he’s doing…it just works better on the GMAT than it does in a presidential debate.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

The post GMAT Tip of the Week: Marco Rubio, Repetition, and Sentence Correction appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Circular Reasoning in GMAT Critical Reaso  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Feb 2016, 10:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Circular Reasoning in GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions
Image
Consider this argument:

Anatomical bilateral symmetry is a common trait. It follows, therefore, that it confers survival advantages on organisms. After all, if bilateral symmetry did not confer such advantages, it would not be common.

What is the flaw here?

The argument restates rather than proves. The conclusion is a  premise, too – we start out by assuming that the conclusion is true and then state that the conclusion is true.

If A (bilateral symmetry) were not B (confer survival advantages), A (bilateral symmetry) would not be C (common).

A (bilateral symmetry) is C (common) so A (bilateral symmetry) is B (confer survival advantages).

Note that we did not try to prove that “A is C implies A is B”. We did not explain the connection between C and B. For our reasoning, all we said is that if A were not B, it would not be C, so we are starting out by taking the conclusion to be true.

This is called circular reasoning. It is a kind of logical fallacy – a flaw in the logic. You begin with what you are trying to prove, using your own conclusion as one of your premises.

Why is it good to understand circular reasoning for the GMAT? A critical reasoning question that asks you to mimic the reasoning argument could require you to identify such a flawed reasoning and find the argument that mimics it.

Continuing with the previous example:

Anatomical bilateral symmetry is a common trait. It follows, therefore, that it confers survival advantages on organisms. After all, if bilateral symmetry did not confer such advantages, it would not be common.

The pattern of reasoning in which one of the following arguments is most similar to that in the argument above?

(A) Since it is Sawyer who is negotiating for the city government, it must be true that the city takes the matter seriously. After all, if Sawyer had not been available, the city would have insisted that the negotiations be deferred.

(B) Clearly, no candidate is better qualified for the job than Trumbull. In fact, even to suggest that there might be a more highly qualified candidate seems absurd to those who have seen Trumbull at work.

(C) If Powell lacked superior negotiating skills, she would not have been appointed arbitrator in this case. As everyone knows, she is the appointed arbitrator, so her negotiating skills are, detractors notwithstanding, bound to be superior.

(D) Since Varga was away on vacation at the time, it must have been Rivers who conducted the secret negotiations. Any other scenario makes little sense, for Rivers never does the negotiating unless Varga is unavailable.

(E) If Wong is appointed arbitrator, a decision will be reached promptly. Since it would be absurd to appoint anyone other than Wong as arbitrator, a prompt decision can reasonably be expected.

We’ve established that the above pattern of reasoning has a circular reasoning flaw. Let’s consider each answer option to find the one which has similarly flawed reasoning.

(A) Since it is Sawyer who is negotiating for the city government, it must be true that the city takes the matter seriously. After all, if Sawyer had not been available, the city would have insisted that the negotiations be deferred.

Here is the structure of this argument:

If A (Sawyer) were not B (available), C (the city) would have D (insisted on deferring).

Since A (Sawyer) is B (available to the city), C (the city) does E (takes matter seriously).

Obviously, this argument structure is not the same as in the original argument.

(B) Clearly, no candidate is better qualified for the job than Trumbull. In fact, even to suggest that there might be a more highly qualified candidate seems absurd to those who have seen Trumbull at work.

Here is the structure of this argument:

A (people who have seen Trumbull at work) find B (Trumbull is not the best) absurd, therefore B (Trumbull is not the best) is false.

This is not circular reasoning. We have not assumed that B is false in our premises, we are simply saying that people think B is absurd. This is flawed logic too, but it is not circular reasoning.

(C) If Powell lacked superior negotiating skills, she would not have been appointed arbitrator in this case. As everyone knows, she is the appointed arbitrator, so her negotiating skills are, detractors notwithstanding, bound to be superior.

Here is the structure of this argument:

If A (Powell) were not B (had superior negotiating skills), A (Powell) would not have been C (appointed arbitrator).

A (Powell) is C (appointed arbitrator), therefore A (Powell) is B (had superior negotiating skills).

Note that the structure of the argument matches the structure of our original argument – this is circular reasoning, too. We are saying that if A were not B, A would not be C and concluding that since A is C, A is B. The conclusion is already taken to be true in the initial argument, so we can see it is is also an example of circular reasoning.

Hence (C) is the correct answer. Nevertheless, let’s look at the other two options and why they don’t work:

(D) Since Varga was away on vacation at the time, it must have been Rivers who conducted the secret negotiations. Any other scenario makes little sense, for Rivers never does the negotiating unless Varga is unavailable.

Here is the structure of this argument:

If A (Varga) is B (available), C (Rivers) does not do D (negotiate).

A (Varga) was not B (available), so C (Rivers) did D (negotiate).

This logic is flawed – the premise tells us what happens when A is B, however it does not tell us what happens when A is not B. We cannot conclude anything about what happens when A is not B. And because this is not circular reasoning, it cannot be the answer.

(E) If Wong is appointed arbitrator, a decision will be reached promptly. Since it would be absurd to appoint anyone other than Wong as arbitrator, a prompt decision can reasonably be expected.

Here is the structure of this argument:

If A (Wong) is B (appointed arbitrator), C (a decision) will be D (reached promptly).

A (Wong) not being B (appointed arbitrator) would be absurd, so C (a decision) will be D (reached promptly).

Again, this argument uses brute force, but it is not circular reasoning. “A not being B would be absurd” is not a convincing reason, so the argument is not strong as it is, but in any case, we don’t have to worry about it since it doesn’t use circular reasoning.

Take a look at this question for practice:

Dr. A: The new influenza vaccine is useless at best and possibly dangerous. I would never use it on a patient.

Dr. B: But three studies published in the Journal of Medical Associates have rated that vaccine as unusually effective.

Dr. A: The studies must have been faulty because the vaccine is worthless.

In which of the following is the reasoning most similar to that of Dr. A?

(A) Three of my patients have been harmed by that vaccine during the past three weeks, so the vaccine is unsafe.

(B) Jerrold Jersey recommends this milk, and I don’t trust Jerrold Jersey, so I won’t buy this milk.

(C) Wingz tennis balls perform best because they are far more effective than any other tennis balls.

(D) I’m buying Vim Vitamins. Doctors recommend them more often than they recommend any other vitamins, so Vim Vitamins must be good.

(E) Since University of Muldoon graduates score about 20 percent higher than average on the GMAT, Sheila Lee, a University of Muldoon graduate, will score about 20 percent higher than average when she takes the GMAT.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Circular Reasoning in GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
3 Things to Consider If You Are Applying to Business School as an Inve  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Feb 2016, 19:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: 3 Things to Consider If You Are Applying to Business School as an Investment Banker
Image
Investment banks are one of the biggest feeders of talent into business schools around the world. Investment bankers have consistently earned a reputation as quant jocks with powerful academic pedigrees and great senior leadership exposure. With backgrounds like this, it should come as no surprise that bankers flood campuses at elite MBA programs across the globe.

With such great numbers comes challenges as well. Many schools could easily fill a classroom with qualified bankers if they so chose, but with diversity of experience being such an important component of a quality MBA student community, schools seek instead to balance out the student body with people from various career backgrounds. As an overrepresented applicant pool, bankers must think strategically about how to position their candidacy.

Let’s explore some of the things to keep in mind as you construct your application as an investment banker:

Stand Out:

I know this is easier said than done, but with so much competition coming out of investment banks, it is important to find areas within your application that will distinguish you from the hordes of other applicants from your bank and others. This does not need to be limited to just the professional arena either, so explore the personal side of your credentials as well. Focus on highlighting areas where you have made an impact in your personal or professional careers to separate you from the masses.

Personalize Your Profile:

One of the biggest mistakes many bankers make when applying to business school is focusing exclusively on their professional career. This is a negative knock on professionals from this industry, so grab the admissions committee’s attention and go the opposite way by personalizing your application process. Business schools truly evaluate candidates in a holistic manner, so take advantage of the more personal touch points of your application, such as the essay, interview, and short answer questions to tell your story. Utilizing these aspects to humanize your profile is a great way to stand out from the competition.

Highlight Extracurriculars:

Another useful way to distinguish yourself from other MBA candidates is to highlight your history of engagement outside the work place. Schools see candidates who have this track record as likely to continue this trend as future students and alumni of their programs. Also, with the long hours bankers tend to work, many are unable to take on meaningful extracurricular opportunities – go against the norm here, and develop some experience in this capacity outside of the office to further differentiate your profile from other bankers.

Follow the tips above to stand out from your competition in the investment banking industry.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can find more of his articles here.

The post 3 Things to Consider If You Are Applying to Business School as an Investment Banker appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
SAT Tip of the Week: How to Improve Your SAT Score the Second Time  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: How to Improve Your SAT Score the Second Time
Image
Every year, high school seniors sit down in testing centers across the country to take the SAT. They know that college admissions officials will consider their SAT score along with their letters of recommendation, transcripts, and essays, so a good performance on this test is critical.

Some students aren’t satisfied with the score they receive the first time they take the SAT, so they make the decision to retake the test. Naturally, these students want to know how to improve their SAT scores so they can perform well on the test the second time around. Let’s take a look at some simple tips that can lead to SAT score improvement:

Examine the Results of Your First SAT

Students who take the SAT receive a score report that includes a lot more than their final scores – the report offers a detailed breakdown of the student’s performance on the exam. These results can be tremendously helpful to a student who wants to pinpoint their weakest areas on the SAT. For instance, looking at your detailed score report, you may notice that you answered a large percentage of algebra questions incorrectly, but performed well on questions that involved data analysis. With this information, you can avoid spending too much time reviewing your strong skills and focus instead on sharpening your weaker skills.

Focused Study

A student who knows where they went wrong on the first test has the tools for improving his or her SAT scores the second time around. After analyzing your first SAT results, it’s time to create study aids that can strengthen your skills that need attention.

For example, you might learn that you need to expand your knowledge of concepts that will be tested in the new SAT Math section, so it’s a good idea to find a list of concepts commonly tested on the SAT and creates mnemonics for each of them. These mnemonics all might relate to your family or favorite hobbies so they are easy to practice and remember, and can help you improve your score on this section as a result. Finding study tactics such as this and utilizing them to focus on your areas of weakness will be key to improving your SAT score.

Evaluate Other Aspects of Performance on the First Test

In some cases, there are other factors that influence a student’s performance on the SAT. It’s worthwhile to think back to the day of the test to examine what these other factors might be. Perhaps you weren’t feeling well on test day. A student who has a terrible cold or cough is not likely to do their best on the exam. Or maybe you didn’t slept well the night before, which could have caused you to be tired and unfocused during the exam. By analyzing what went “wrong” on test day, you can work to avoid these problems the second time around.

Also, some students experience test anxiety: they arrive to the test well-prepared, but feel very anxious in an actual test-taking situation. As a result, they aren’t able to focus on the material. If this sounds like you, fortunately, there are ways to deal with test anxiety that can improve SAT scores. Students who are feeling good and have a sense of confidence are able to showcase their skills on the SAT and truly improve their scores.

Prep with the Experts

When it comes to the SAT, improvement is achievable with the right kind of instruction. At Veritas Prep, students have the opportunity to choose from a variety of SAT tutoring options so they can have their questions answered and issues addressed, and are able to retake the test with confidence.

Whether you’re taking the test for the first time or looking to improve your current SAT score, we are proud to assist you in any way we can. Contact our staff at Veritas Prep today and get started on the journey toward your best score on the SAT!

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The post SAT Tip of the Week: How to Improve Your SAT Score the Second Time appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Why MBA Graduates Want to Work in Real Estate  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2016, 13:59
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Why MBA Graduates Want to Work in Real Estate
Image
Many top business schools in the country have witnessed a significant shift in demand over the last eight years. Due in part to irresponsible banking practices, over one million middle-class families lost their homes during the 2008 financial crisis. Even though the economy has dramatically improved since the crisis, it is understandable that many recent MBA grads are wary of getting into banking for many reasons.

In the pre-recession world, banking careers were considered a traditional sector for graduating MBA students. Today, previously unconventional job markets are experiencing notable growth. One of those markets is real estate, which is beginning to draw in plenty of business students despite its potential risks.

According to the Financial Time’s recent analysis of the top 10 business schools, the banking industry has dropped over 40% in popularity in just eight years. The London Business School and Harvard Business School have both reported drops of over 50% in the popularity of banking careers. Experts predict this negative trend will continue, especially as new MBA specialization programs gain desirability.

So where are all the MBA grads going to work, if not in banking? A few of the most sought after industries include real estate, sustainability, analytics, technology, and finance. Job prospects are a large determining factor for business students – many prefer to work for progressive, innovative, and collaborative companies.

Business schools have recognized this change in demand and have responded accordingly. In April 2015, Georgetown dedicated 10 million dollars to the construction of a new real estate center; NYU updated their real estate facilities in 2012, and the University of Miami followed their lead shortly after in 2013.

The real estate boom was born from the financial crisis and a resulting strong buyer’s market. Hundreds of thousands of empty homes were available to purchase at below rock-bottom prices. As the economy recovered, people began snatching up property with increasing momentum. MBA graduates are drawn to this market because of its resilience, growth, and lucrative potential.

There are a few obstacles that business students may face when transitioning into a real estate career, however. People skills are crucial – it is nearly impossible to succeed in this industry without them, and breaking into the field with few connections can be more complicated for newcomers than compared to traditional career paths.

Additionally, there is the realistic danger of the housing bubble bursting again, which is something to consider. Even though housing lenders are no longer issuing reckless loans, there is no guarantee that the market will not crash again. In fact, experts predict there is a 70% chance that property values will drop over the next year. Business schools have prepared for the worst by limiting class sizes and offering job placement programs to help students find jobs in other fields.

The potential for volatility has not stopped MBA graduates from flocking to this expanding market. While it is impossible to tell what the future will hold exactly, business students continue to gravitate towards real estate regardless of the risks. Perhaps after witnessing the financial crisis unfold around them, many career options seem equally risky, but at least pursuing a career in real estate will make them unique amongst their classmates.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

The post Why MBA Graduates Want to Work in Real Estate appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Financial Times Ranks INSEAD as the #1 MBA Program in the World  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2016, 18:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Financial Times Ranks INSEAD as the #1 MBA Program in the World
Image
The Financial Times recently released their Global MBA Rankings for 2016, and this year, INSEAD topped the list. This is the first time a “one-year MBA program” has ranked #1 in the Financial Times‘ rankings.

With this honor, INSEAD also becomes only the fifth school to ever assume the top spot in the Financial Times‘ 18-year history of publishing their rankings – the only schools to reach #1 thus far have been Harvard Business School, the Stanford Graduate School of Business, London Business School, and the Wharton School of Business, all of which occupy the rest of the top five slots for this year’s rankings.

INSEAD prides itself on being the “business school of the world,” and boasts of an international faculty and student body of over 80 different nationalities that enriches classroom discussions and creates life changing experiences for its students through its cultural diversity and views. INSEAD’s campuses in France and Singapore further add to the student experience with opportunities to travel across Europe and Asia with fellow MBA participants during the program.

In his letter to INSEAD alumni, Dean Ilian Mihov attributes the school’s #1 ranking to what INSEAD values: “diversity, academic excellence, entrepreneurial culture and extensive global alumni network.” The school’s international faculty also works together to continuously improve its curriculum and deliver exceptional educational experiences to all its students in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. Mihov also shared that this marked a “triple first” for INSEAD, becoming the first and only school to have all three of its MBA programs ranked #1 by the FT in their respective categories: INSEAD MBA ranked #1 for MBA programs, the Tsinghua INSEAD EMBA ranked #1 for EMBA programs, and the INSEAD Global EMBA was honored as the highest ranked single school program.

In a separate letter, the INSEAD MBA Admissions team shared the profile of its latest intake of 514 students, with 75 nationalities represented – 30% of them women – including students from Indian, American, Chinese, French, British, and Canadian nationalities. The average age of INSEAD’s incoming class is 29 and its average GMAT score is 702.

INSEAD has also continued its “Conditional Acceptance Offer” of offering a place to candidates who have the potential and quality to be admitted, but need one more year of professional experience. Introduced in 2014, the school has found this offer to be a good way to retain young, bright candidates for future MBA classes. 15 students received such an offer for their latest intake.

Surely this remarkable achievement will be something to consider when determining whether INSEAD is the right business school for you.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Written by Edison Cu, a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for INSEAD.

The post Financial Times Ranks INSEAD as the #1 MBA Program in the World appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Business School Deans’ Forecasts of 2016 Online MBA Trends  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Feb 2016, 20:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Business School Deans’ Forecasts of 2016 Online MBA Trends
Image
Businessbecause.com recently published their annual predictions in business school education from some of the top business school deans around the world.  These predictions touched on topics that covered all aspects of business school, from technology to globalization.

For example, in regards to the proliferation of technology in and out of the classroom, Dean Alison Davis-Blake of the University Of Michigan Ross School of Business noted, “We will continue to see every single player using technology expensively and intensively in some way.”

However, she isn’t as bullish on the idea that technology will completely replace the traditional classroom based instruction in most business schools, saying, “I think we’ll see more changes [made] by bringing technology into the classrooms that we have, rather than new online degrees.” Now obviously Dean Blake might be a little biased in this assessment because a move towards online degrees could hurt the traditional business schools, but given the current state of online education, investments in the classroom would pay off more for students than investments in online degrees.

A different view of technology usage was offered up by Ivan Bofarull, who is the Director of the Global Intelligence Office at ESADE Business School in Spain. He believes business school education is going towards more of a hybrid model of learning: “All-you-can-learn’ digital offerings will coexist with highly-customized, sophisticated, residential course deliveries. MIT’s MicroMasters or Arizona State University’s Global Freshman Academy, which allow some credit transfer between MOOCs and residential degrees, are only the beginning.”

While it is an interesting idea to allow classes taken in a MOOC to count towards a degree, and will certainly keep costs lower for students, there are some risks that should be considered. First, compared to undergraduate school, there is a greater focus on employability in business school. Will the Citibanks, Goldman Sachs and JP Morgans of the world accept the idea that their incoming employees took finance classes online versus traditional learning methods?

Also, if a school is to open the door to MOOC credit transferability, it will be hard to justify limiting it. For example, if a school says a finance class can be transferred over, then why not an accounting class, a marketing class, and an economics class. Pretty soon, students will expect to be able to transfer over their entire core curriculum from a MOOC, which could drastically impact revenue at business schools.

One last prediction worth nothing comes from Andrea Masini, Dean of the HEC Business School in Paris, who speaks about the differences in personalized education versus a more standardized education: “What we observe is a clear distinction between business schools that target a large number of customers and an elite school like ours that provides a premium service. Customization and proximity [between faculty and] the participants are fundamental.” Given this view, we could assume that Mr. Masini would not be a fan of online education and wants to market his school as a “premium” offering that can create customized programs in the classroom.

While there is no clear-cut consensus on the future of online learning, we can be sure it is front of mind for business school leaders, and that there are certainly more changes to come on this front.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

The post Business School Deans’ Forecasts of 2016 Online MBA Trends appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
GMAT Tip of the Week: OJ Simpson’s Defense Team And Critical Reasoning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Feb 2016, 18:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: OJ Simpson’s Defense Team And Critical Reasoning Strategy
Image
If you’re like many people this month, you’re thoroughly enjoying the guilty pleasure that is FX’s series The People v. OJ Simpson. And whether you’re in it to reminisce about the 1990s or for the wealth of Kardashian family history, one thing remains certain (even though, according to the state of California – spoiler alert! – that thing is not OJ’s guilt):

Robert Shaprio, Johnnie Cochran, F. Lee Bailey, Alan Dershowitz, and (yes, even) Robert Kardashian can provide you with the ultimate blueprint for GMAT Critical Reasoning success.

This past week’s third episode focused on the preparations of the prosecutors and of the defense, and showcased some crucial differences between success and failure on GMAT CR:

The prosecution made some classic GMAT CR mistakes, most notably that they went in to the case assuming the truth of their position (that OJ was guilty). On the other hand, the defense took nothing for granted – when they didn’t like the evidence (the bloody glove, for example) they looked for ways that it must be faulty evidence (Mark Fuhrman and the LAPD were racist).

This is how you must approach GMAT Critical Reasoning! The single greatest mistake that examinees make during the GMAT is in accepting that the argument they’re given is valid – like Marcia Clark, you’re a nice, good-natured person and you’ll give the argument the benefit of the doubt. But in law and on the GMAT, bullies like Travolta’s Robert Shapiro win the day. The name of the game is “Critical Reasoning” – make sure that you’re being critical.

What does that look like on the test? It means:

Be Skeptical of Arguments

From the first word of a Strengthen, Weaken, or Assumption question, you’re reading skeptically, and almost angrily so. You’re not buying this argument and you’re searching for holes immediately. Often times these arguments will actually seem pretty valid (sort of like, you know, “OJ did it, based on the glove, the blood in the Brondo, his footprint at the scene, etc.”), but your job is to attack them so you’d better start attacking immediately.

Look for Details That Don’t Match

If an argument says, for example, that “the murder rate is down, so the police department must be doing a better job preventing violent crime…” notice that murder is not the same thing as violent crime, and that even if violent crime is down, you don’t have a direct link to the police department being the catalysts for preventing it. This is part of not buying the argument – when the general flow of ideas suggests “yes,” make sure that the details do, too.

Look for Alternative Explanations

Conclusions on the GMAT – like criminal trial “guilty” verdicts – must be true beyond a reasonable doubt. So even though the premises might make it seem quite likely that a conclusion is true, if there is an alternate explanation that’s consistent with the facts but allows for a different conclusion, that conclusion cannot be logically drawn. This is where the Simpson legal team was so successful: the evidence was overwhelming in its suggestion that Simpson was guilty (as the soon-after civil trial proves), but the defense was able to create just enough suspicion that he could have been framed that the jury was able to acquit.

So whether you’re appalled or enthralled as you watch The People v. OJ Simpson and the defense team shrewdness it portrays, know that the show has valuable insight for you as you attempt to become a Critical Reasoning master. If you want to keep your GMAT verbal score out of jail, you might want to keep up with one particular Kardashian.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

The post GMAT Tip of the Week: OJ Simpson’s Defense Team And Critical Reasoning Strategy appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Ratios in GMAT Data Sufficiency  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Ratios in GMAT Data Sufficiency
Image
We know that ratios are the building blocks for a lot of other concepts such as time/speed, work/rate and mixtures. As such, we spend a lot of time getting comfortable with understanding and manipulating ratios, so the GMAT questions that test ratios seem simple enough, but not always! Just like questions from all other test areas, questions on ratios can be tricky too, especially when they are formatted as Data Sufficiency questions.

Let’s look at two cases today: when a little bit of data is sufficient, and when a lot of data is insufficient.

When a little bit of data is sufficient!

Three brothers shared all the proceeds from the sale of their inherited property. If the eldest brother received exactly 5/8 of the total proceeds, how much money did the youngest brother (who received the smallest share) receive from the sale?

Statement 1: The youngest brother received exactly 1/5 the amount received by the middle brother.

Statement 2: The middle brother received exactly half of the two million dollars received by the eldest brother.

First impressions on reading this question? The question stem gives the fraction of money received by one brother. Statement 1 gives the fraction of money received by the youngest brother relative to the amount received by the middle brother. Statement 2 gives the fraction of money received by the middle brother relative to the eldest brother and an actual amount. It seems like the three of these together give us all the information we need. Let’s dig deeper now.

From the Question stem:

Eldest brother’s share = (5/8) of Total

Statement 1: Youngest Brother’s share = (1/5) * Middle brother’s share

We don’t have any actual number – all the information is in fraction/ratio form. Without an actual value, we cannot find the amount of money received by the youngest brother, therefore, Statement 1 alone is not sufficient.

Statement 2: Middle brother’s share = (1/2) * Eldest brother’s share, and the eldest brother’s share = 2 million dollars

Middle brother’s share = (1/2) * 2 million dollars = 1 million dollars

Now, we might be tempted to jump to Statement 1 where the relation between youngest brother’s share and middle brother’s share is given, but hold on: we don’t need that information. We know from the question stem that the eldest brother’s share is (5/8) of the total share.

So 2 million = (5/8) of the total share, therefore the total share = 3.2 million dollars.

We already know the share of the eldest and middle brothers, so we can subtract their shares out of the total and get the share of the youngest brother.

Youngest brother’s share = 3.2 million – 2 million – 1 million = 0.2 million dollars

Statement 2 alone is sufficient, therefore, the answer is B.

When a lot of data is insufficient!

A department manager distributed a number of books, calendars, and diaries among the staff in the department, with each staff member receiving x books, y calendars, and z diaries. How many staff members were in the department?

Statement 1: The numbers of books, calendars, and diaries that each staff member received were in the ratio 2:3:4, respectively.

Statement 2: The manager distributed a total of 18 books, 27 calendars, and 36 diaries.

First impressions on reading this question? The question stem tells us that each staff member received the same number of books, calendars, and diaries. Statement 1 gives us the ratio of books, calendars and diaries. Statement 2 gives us the actual numbers. It certainly seems that we should be able to obtain the answer. Let’s find out:

Looking at the question stem, Staff Member 1 recieved x books, y calendars, and z diaries, Staff Member 2 recieved x books, y calendars, and z diaries… and so on until Staff Member n (who also recieves x books, y calendars, and z diaries).

With this in mind, the total number of books = nx, the total number of calendars = ny, and the total number of diaries = nz.

Question: What is n?

Statement 1 tells us that x:y:z = 2:3:4. This means the values of x, y and z can be:

2, 3, and 4,

or 4, 6, and 8,

or 6, 9, and 12,

or any other values in the ratio 2:3:4.

They needn’t necessarily be 2, 3 and 4, they just need the required ratio of 2:3:4.

Obviously, n can be anything here, therefore, Statement 1 alone is not sufficient.

Statement 2 tell us that nx = 18, ny = 27, and nz = 36.

Now we know the actual values of nx, ny and nz, but we still don’t know the values of x, y, z and n.

They could be

2, 3, 4 and 9

or 6, 9, 12 and 3

Therefore, Statement 2 alone is also not sufficient.

Considering both statements together, note that Statement 2 tells us that nx:ny:nz = 18:27:36 = 2:3:4 (they had 9 as a common factor).

Since n is a common factor on left side, x:y:z = 2:3:4 (ratios are best expressed in the lowest form).

This is a case of what we call “we already knew that” – information given in Statement 1 is already a part of Statement 2, so it is not possible that Statement 2 alone is not sufficient but that together Statement 1 and 2 are. Hence, both statements together are not sufficient, and our answer must be E.

A question that arises often here is, “Why can’t we say that the number of staff members must be 9?”

This is because the ratio of 2:3:4 is same as the ratio of 6:9:12, which is same as 18:27:36 (when you multiply each number of a ratio by the same number, the ratio remains unchanged).

If 18 books, 27 calendars, and 36 diaries are distributed in the ratio 2:3:4, we could give them all to one person, or to 3 people (giving them each 6 books, 9 calendars and 12 diaries), or to 9 people (giving them each 2 books, 3 calendars and 4 diaries).

When we see 18, 27 and 36, what comes to mind is that the number of people could have been 9, which would mean that the department manager distributed 2 books, 3 calendars and 4 diaries to each person. But we know that 9 is divisible by 3, which should remind us that the number of people could also be 3, which would mean that the manager distributed 6 books, 9 calendars and 12 diaries to each person. As such, we still don’t know how many staff members there are, and our answer remians E.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Ratios in GMAT Data Sufficiency appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Jump-Start Your GRE Prep With a Free GRE Strategy Session  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2016, 17:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Jump-Start Your GRE Prep With a Free GRE Strategy Session
Image
Whether you are planning to apply to business school, pursue another field of graduate study, or simply want to keep your future options open, you’ve decided to take the GRE. The GRE is a challenging exam and if you are planning on taking the test, you undoubtedly have questions about how to prepare and how to maximize your score.

If you’re looking to jump-start your GRE preparation, register to attend Veritas Prep’s free online GRE Strategy Session. Hosted by Veritas Prep’s GRE Course co-creator, Brian Galvin, this one-hour session will go over the basics of the GRE and show you some of the advanced strategies needed to tackle this exam. In addition, each session concludes with a Q&A session, so you can have your toughest GRE questions answered in live time.

So what are you waiting for? Register to attend the next Veritas Prep GRE Strategy Session now and improve your chances of GRE success!

Wednesday, February 24

7:30pm – 8:30pm (Eastern)

Wednesday, March 23

8:00pm – 9:00pm (Eastern)

Register now!

Want a more focused approach to your GRE preparation? Check out our GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The post Jump-Start Your GRE Prep With a Free GRE Strategy Session appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
7 Resources You Need to Utilize While in College  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2016, 12:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: 7 Resources You Need to Utilize While in College
Image
One great and often overlooked part of being in college is the wealth of resources you have access to. Some of these resources are exactly what you think of when you think about colleges – big libraries, distinguished professors, expansive dining halls. – but there is also a variety of lesser-known, but equally important services and centers that many colleges have to support their students and contribute to the overall college experience.

It’s a good idea to check these places out, since it is your tuition money that funds them, after all! College is one of the rare times where many of the services available to you will be free (technically nothing in life or college is really free, but that’s besides the point), so take advantage of this while you can. Here is just a sampling of resources found at many universities that I recommend utilizing during your time in college:

Career Counseling

College is about learning, but it’s still not a bad idea to prepare for the job search early. Lots of colleges have career service centers that can connect you with alumni networks, guide you in crafting your résumés, and help you figure out what future career path will be right for you.

Fitness Center

This is a big one for me – gym memberships are really expensive, but colleges give you access to their fitness centers for free. When someone gives you an opportunity to get in shape and stay healthy for free, that’s not something you should turn down. Plus, taking a break from your studies to exercise is a great way to de-stress and have some fun – the pick-up basketball games I’ve played at my school’s gym has been some of the best of my life!

Student Health Center

Again, healthcare is something that will cost a lot more once you get outside of college. Getting sick when you’re separated from your parents can be a jarring experience, so know that you can feel comfortable reaching out to campus health professionals to help you.

Mental Health Counseling

As much fun as college can be, it can also be a very stressful time. Like student health centers, mental health counseling is often offered by colleges as a safe place for students to go to speak to a mental health professional about any difficulties they may be experiencing while at school. Your school will want you to be healthy, mentally as well as physically, so don’t be afraid to seek this service out.

Writing Center

There are more people to turn to than just your professors or TAs when you’re having trouble with a writing assignment. Lots of schools have writing centers, where students and staff will go over your papers with you and give you detailed feedback on how to improve. You’ll probably have to be proactive in making an appointment, though – from my experience, spots at these centers fill up fast!

Library Staff

In high school you may not have talked to your librarians much (mine were awesome, but that’s a different story), but in college, the library staff can be incredibly helpful with research or just with navigating around the facility. The Dewey Decimal System can be a little difficult to use, especially when the library has 4 floors and thousands of books, so utilize your library staff to assist you.

Academic Support

Some colleges offer subject tutoring for students in certain classes, while others hold workshops on subjects such as how to manage homework time in college, steps to succeed on problem sets, and a variety of other topics. All colleges want their students to succeed academically; it’s incumbent on the student to seek out what academic support programs and resources their college has at their disposal, but there will always be options available to you, no matter what school you go to. Trust me, if you search for academic help, you’ll find it!

College is more than just going to school (even though school is very important). Universities have lots of resources to help you in all aspects of your life – use them while you still can, and while they’re still free!

Do you still need help with your college applications? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and register to attend one of our FREE Online College Workshops! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

By Aidan Calvelli.

The post 7 Resources You Need to Utilize While in College appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Is This Alternative Business School in San Francisco Right For You?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2016, 17:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Is This Alternative Business School in San Francisco Right For You?
Image
Today’s activists don’t typically cruise the nation in old vans and grungy bell-bottom pants – the millennial crowd is instead opting to change the “system” from the inside. You can find passionate young adults in nearly every career path, MBA graduates included. This generation is faced with unique and significant issues, and they have responded by flocking to forward-looking organizations and companies. But, what about a forward-looking school? Is there a place for an alternative business school?

In San Francisco, the Presidio Graduate School has been catering to a unique group of business students who want to make a positive impact on the future. The 150 student campus was founded in 2003 and touts itself as a progressive alternative to mainstream business schools. In response to a recent Bloomberg Businessweek student survey, nearly 80% of the participating business school students said they strongly agree that they feel inspired to pursue an ethical future, and this business school may be just the place for them to do so.

The Presidio Graduate School not only offers a specialized MBA in Sustainable Management, they also provide a laid-back atmosphere that is perfect for innovation and idea exchange. After the 2008 financial crisis and various scandals on Wall Street, it is no wonder that MBA students are increasingly drawn to more unconventional, ethical programs such as this.

It is becoming increasingly common to judge how progressive a business school is based on its student body demographics, and the Presidio Graduate School sets the standard high: 56% of its students are female, and roughly 90% of all students go on to work within sustainability roles after graduation. In August 2015, the White House asked the country’s top business schools for a commitment to increase pro-diversity efforts. Unfortunately, the nationwide statistics are not as encouraging as the Presidio Graduate School’s – 0ut of 9,000 MBA graduates, only 29% are female, and a meager 15% of the surveyed business students belonged to a minority ethnicity. The Presidio Graduate School sets an excellent example for schools looking to increase diversity on their campus.

While the Presidio Graduate School is one of the nation’s most progressive business schools, their financial future is uncertain. Small class sizes, combined with a modest tuition could result in an impaired cash flow. They charge less than half of what their competitors do, and have cut other corners to avoid losing sight of their vision, such as renting out all of their campus buildings.

Unlike in most traditional business schools, a majority of the learning that goes on here is done remotely. The average business student at the Presidio Graduate School will only attend a physical class a handful of times per month, and other frills, such as banquets and fancy events, are nowhere to be found. Since approximately 80% of their students are local to the Bay Area, the school hopes that their enrollment will increase as their name gains momentum.

Even though graduating from the Presidio Graduate School means an MBA student will likely earn $40K less per year than their traditional MBA counterparts, that has not stopped the business school from drawing in new students. Ensuring our global and national sustainability is an important task, and as long as there is a demand for progressive MBA programs, schools like the Presidio Graduate School are sure to keep popping up.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

The post Is This Alternative Business School in San Francisco Right For You? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Huge Benefits to Studying in Short Chunks  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Feb 2016, 13:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Huge Benefits to Studying in Short Chunks
Image
Many students wait until the last minute to study for tests or do major projects. Before I get too far in, let me just say that for a long time I was one of those students (and sadly, sometimes I still am). Putting things off is easy to rationalize – after all, if you get the work done eventually, it doesn’t matter when you do it, right? Wrong! Waiting until the last minute is a bad habit and extreme procrastination almost invariably brings down the quality of whatever it is you are trying to accomplish.

On the SAT, putting off studying until a week or two before the test is an all-too-common phenomenon. I know a lot of students who wouldn’t even think about the test until it was already almost upon them. Fun fact: many of those students didn’t do nearly as well as they wanted to.

It’s no secret that in order to do your best on the SAT, you have to put in the time. The test isn’t really about knowledge, but rather, is about being familiar with the questions and knowing how the test operates. With these two topics, cramming is of very little help. You can’t cram familiarity and understanding – you have to be disciplined over an extended and consistent period of time.

My recommendation for how to best manage your time studying for the SAT is to spend the two months leading up to your exam date studying in small, manageable chunks. Spending 30-40 minutes per day, three-four times per week, is a lot more helpful than spending 4 hours on one day the week before the official exam. It’s pretty easy to find 30 minutes of free time in a day; it’s a lot harder to find 4 hours.

This 30-minute chunk method is how I studied, and it had a lot of benefits for me. Here are 3 biggest ones:

  • I felt like I really understood the test. Instead of seeing the SAT as an unpredictable monster, I came to be really familiar with how it worked. Spending a little time with the test on a consistent basis made me more comfortable with the structure and the patterns of the questions, so I knew what to expect on test day.
  • I didn’t feel rushed to learn everything I needed to. Since I started months before my test, I knew that when I found a weak spot, I would have time to fix it. This gave me the confidence to be honest about my shortcomings. I could devote a week to the Writing Section if I found that I was bad at comma usage and still not feel like I was rushed to teach myself geometry. The feeling of having plenty of time made my stress surrounding the test significantly decrease.
  • I found it much easier to focus for a half hour than it was to focus for 4 hours. I don’t know about you, but my attention span really isn’t that long. The best way for me to maximize my study time was to use short intervals of serious focus. Doing full practice tests is important, but if that’s your entire study strategy, you’re likely to get bored and burnt out pretty quickly.
I urge you to resist putting off studying for the SAT – if you start studying early and keep yourself on a regular, manageable study plan, your anxiety about the test will fall while your SAT score will jump.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

By Aidan Calvelli.

The post SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Huge Benefits to Studying in Short Chunks appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
All You Need to Know About Using Interest Equations on the GMAT  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Feb 2016, 19:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: All You Need to Know About Using Interest Equations on the GMAT
Image
As an undergraduate, I concentrated in Finance. When I tell people this, they make two unwarranted assumptions: the first is that I work in Finance (I don’t), and the second is that I am a glutton for mathematical punishment (debatable).

The reason people are intimidated by the kinds of compound interest equations we encounter in finance classes is that they look complicated. GMAT test-takers get anxious whenever I introduce this topic in class. But, as with most seemingly abstruse topics, these concepts are far less difficult than they appear at first glance.

Here’s all we really need to know about interest equations: if we’re talking about simple interest, the interest will be the same in every time period, and the equation you assemble will end up being straightforward linear algebra (if you choose to do algebra, that is). If we’re talking about compound interest, we’re really talking about an exponent question. The rest involves a bit of logic and algebraic manipulation.

Look at this official question that many of my students have initially struggled with:

An investment of $1000 was made in a certain account and earned interest that was compounded annually. The annual interest rate was fixed for the duration of the investment, and after 12 years the $1000 increased to 4000 by earning interest. In how many years after the initial investment was made would the 1000 have increased to 8000 by earning interest at that rate?

(A) 16

(B) 18

(C) 20

(D) 24

(E) 30

Looking at this question, the first instinct of most test-takers is to start frantically rummaging through their memory banks for that compound interest formula – there’s no need. Take a deep breath and remind yourself that these questions are just exponent questions involving a bit of algebra. With this in mind, let’s call the factor that the principal is multiplied by in each time period “x”. (If you’re accustomed to working with the formula, “x” is basically standing in for your standard (1 + r/100.) If you’re not accustomed to this formula, feel free to retroactively erase this parenthetical from your memory banks.)

If the principal is getting multiplied by “x” each year, then after one year, the investment will be 1000x. After two years the investment will be 1000x^2. After three years, it will be 1000x^3… and so on. In our problem, we’re talking about an investment after 12 years, which would be 1000x^12. If this value is 4000, we get the following equation: 1000x^12 = 4000 (and file away for now that the exponent represents the number of years elapsed).

Ultimately, we want to know what the exponent should be when the investment is at $8000. If you’re looking at the answer choices now and think that 24 seems just a little too easy, your instincts are sound.

We need to work with 1000x^12 = 4000. Let’s simplify:

Divide both sides by 1000 to get x^12 = 4.  Solving for x seems unnecessarily complicated, so let’s consider our options. x^12 = 4 is the same as x^12 = 2^2, so if we take the square root of both sides, we will get x^6 = 2.

Essentially, this means that every 6 years (the exponent) the investment is doubling, or multiplied by 2. But we want to know how long it will take for that initial $1000 to become $8000, or to be multiplied by a factor of 8.

What can we do to x^6 = 2 so that we have an 8 on the right side? We can cube both sides!

(x^6)^3 = 2^3

x^18 = 8

This means that it will take 18 years to increase the investment by a factor of 8. Therefore, our answer is B.

Alternatively, once we see that the investment doubles every 6 years, we can ask ourselves how many times we need to double an investment to go from $1000 to $8000. Doubling once gets us to $2000. Doubling twice gets us to $4000. Doubling a third time gets us to $8000. So if we double the investment every 6 years, and we need the investment to double 3 times, it will take a total of 6*3 = 18 years.

Takeaway: There are plenty of formulas that could come in handy on the GMAT – just know that a little logic and conceptual understanding will allow you to solve many of the questions that seem to require a particular formula. Memorization has limits that logic and mental agility don’t.

*GMATPrep question courtesy of the Graduate Management Admissions Council.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By David Goldstein, a Veritas Prep GMAT instructor based in Boston. You can read more articles by him here.

The post All You Need to Know About Using Interest Equations on the GMAT appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
3 Points International Candidates Need to Highlight in Their MBA Appli  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Feb 2016, 13:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: 3 Points International Candidates Need to Highlight in Their MBA Applications
Image
International MBA applicants to top programs frequently ask how much they should focus on their home countries in their applications, versus demonstrating their similarities to the typically-admitted domestic student. This is a good question, as balancing between fitting in with one’s target MBA program and standing out by bringing something unique to one’s application is a line that all candidates tread carefully.

An international applicant will usually have more materials to consider adding to their application, given the experience of growing up, studying, and working in another country. Even for second-generation immigrants, the wealth of influences and heritage from another culture could be a rich source of essay topics and passing references to consider. Used correctly, they add character and breadth, enhancing the readability of an application, which can help a candidate stand out from a competitive pool of other accomplished applicants from the same industry and country.

If you are applying to business school as an international applicant, take a look at these three factors you should focus on in your application:

1) Uniqueness

MBA essays are best used to tell a unique personal story that allows readers to understand the candidate’s motivation and goals. As an international candidate, you can use your country’s economic, cultural, or even political situations as an interesting and complementary backdrop to further stand out.

Let’s look at some examples of how this can be done:

  • An applicant managing a business from a growing consumer market could be played up to show the candidate’s potential to be a bridge for companies seeking to enter the lucrative market. This would flow nicely into the applicant’s post-MBA goal of leading a global company’s international unit.
  • An applicant who navigated and hurdled a developing country’s political and regulatory challenges to successfully lead a large-scale project of a foreign entity could use this experience to demonstrate his or her maturity and leadership qualities.
  • Candidates from a country encountering great difficulties could position themselves as people who are in a unique position to give back to their country of origin post-MBA, while also helping open the eyes of the student community to global issues.
These experiences show the potential of candidates to serve as a resource for interesting classroom discussions, enriching the experiences of classmates, while also serving as a future bridge to alumni with interest in their respective countries.

Likewise, a sentence or two identifying strong core values and influences that defined a family’s history and how it inspires the applicant serve she dual purpose of showing a personal side to leave a vivid impression with the Admissions Committee, and demonstrating the candidate’s underlying motivation and personal traits. Executing this precisely will result in a profile that comes across genuinely and stands out from the pack.

Applying the right dose of details and balance between personal sentiments and professional rationality on these topics is key in ensuring your essays stay unique and on track.

2) International Exposure

For international candidates who spent most of their lives in their home countries, it is particularly helpful to mention experiences with exchange programs, international assignments, travels abroad, or at the minimum, working with cross-cultural teams. These do not necessarily have to take up major space – sprinkling in tidbits at appropriate instances will still make for an interesting and engaging read. It also helps demonstrate an international mindset, adaptability, and intellectual curiosity.

Instances of initiating projects and leading teams with international components are also valuable, as these will help show the ability to actively contribute to classroom discussions and group project dynamics. Showcasing your teamwork skills via an international setting in this way will assure the Admissions Committee that you will be able to adjust to life on campus, benefit from their program, and contribute to the experiences of your MBA peers.

3) Confidence!

The content and tone of your overall application should be confident that you are an excellent fit for the program, able to keep pace with the academics and classroom rigors the school requires, and maximize your overall experience. Coming from an environment, school, or firm that is different from the usual sources of MBA candidates, you must ensure that confidence in your intellectual horsepower and personal traits comes through, especially in your essays. Standardized measures, such as a great GMAT score, will also help address this.

Crafting such an application requires honest reflection and self-awareness – most applicants find themselves more focused and motivated after investing the time and effort to do so, thus making the whole exercise a valuable experience, so be sure you take ample time to reflect before beginning your writing process.

Creating a personal story while highlighting your successes handling complex projects or academic accomplishments, and combining this with a post-MBA goal that is both compelling and realistic are the usual ingredients for a strong application, and adding the right international flavor to this recipe will help your candidacy shine even more. Finding the right flow between answering the specific questions directly and adding international elements may be challenging, but successfully pulling it off  will result in a very personal and powerful application package.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Written by Edison Cu, a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for INSEAD.

The post 3 Points International Candidates Need to Highlight in Their MBA Applications appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
GMAT Tip of the Week: Verbal Answers Are Like Donald Trump  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2016, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: Verbal Answers Are Like Donald Trump
In the winter/spring of 2016, Donald Trump is everywhere – always on your TV screen, all over your social media feeds, on the tip of everyone’s tongue, and, yes, even lurking in the answer choices on your GMAT verbal section.

Why are verbal answer choices like Donald Trump? Is it that they’re only correct 20% of the time? That they’re very often a lot of boastful verbiage about nothing? Hackneyed comedy aside, there’s a very valid reason and it’s one that Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio learned just last night:

Verbal choices, like Donald Trump, simply MUST be attacked. If you saw last night’s debate (or read any coverage of it) you saw how the two closest challengers changed tactics immensely, verbally attacking Trump all night. The rationale there is that if you let Trump go unchecked, he’s going to attack you and he’s going to get away with his own stump speeches all night. The exact same thing is true of GMAT verbal answer choices. If you don’t attack them – if you’re not actively looking for reasons that they’re wrong – they’ll both beat you tactically and wear you down over the test. You simply must be in attack mode throughout the verbal section.

What does that mean? For almost every answer choice, there’s some reason there why someone would pick it (after all, if no one picks it then it’s just a terrible, useless answer choice). And so if you’re looking for reasons to like an answer choice, you’re going to find lots to like (and in doing so pick some wrong answers) and you’re going to get worn down by keeping wrong answer choices in your “maybe” pile too long. But if, instead, you’re more skeptical about each answer choice, actively looking for reasons not to pick them, that discerning approach will help you more efficiently find correct answers.

Consider the example:

If Shero wins the election, McGuinness will be appointed head of the planning commission. But Stauning is more qualified to head it since he is an architect who has been on the planning commission for 15 years. Unless the polls are grossly inaccurate, Shero will win.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the information above?

(A) If the polls are grossly inaccurate, someone more qualified than McGuinness will be appointed head of the planning commission.

(B) McGuinness will be appointed head of the planning commission only if the polls are a good indication of how the election will turn out.

(C) Either Shero will win the election or Stauning will be appointed head of the planning commission.

(D) McGuinness is not an architect and has not been on the planning commission for 15 years or more.

(E) If the polls are a good indication of how the election will turn out, someone less qualified than Stauning will be appointed head of the planning commission.

Here there’s a lot to like about a lot of answer choices:

A seems plausible. We know that McGuinness isn’t the most qualified, so there’s a high likelihood that a different candidate could find someone better (maybe even Stauning). B also has a lot to like (and it’s actually ALMOST perfect as we’ll discuss in a second). And so on. But you need to attack these answers:

A is fatally flawed. You don’t know for certain that a different candidate would appoint anyone other than McGuinness, and you really only know that one person is more qualified (and does he even want the job?). This cannot be concluded. B has that dangerous word “only” in it – remove it and the answer is correct, but “only if the polls are a good indication” is way too far to go. What if the polls are flawed and the underdog candidate just appoints McGuinness, too? The same logic invalidates C (there’s nothing guaranteeing that a different candidate wouldn’t pick McGuinness), and the word “and” makes D all the harder to prove (how do you know that McGuinness lacks both qualities?).

The lesson? Much like John Kasich may find on that same stage, the nicer and more accommodating you are, the more the GMAT walks over you. If you want to give each answer a fair chance, you’ll find that many answers have enough reason to be tempting. So follow the new GOP debate strategy and always be attacking. You didn’t sign up for the GMAT to make friends with answer choices; you signed up to “win.”

The post GMAT Tip of the Week: Verbal Answers Are Like Donald Trump appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Veritas Prep Representative
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 91
Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: How to Find Composite Numbers on the GMAT  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2016, 15:01
FROM Veritas Prep Admissions Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: How to Find Composite Numbers on the GMAT
Image
We love to talk about prime numbers and their various properties for GMAT preparation, but composite numbers usually aren’t mentioned. Composite numbers are often viewed as whatever is leftover after prime numbers are removed from a set of positive integers (except 1 because 1 is neither prime, nor composite), but it is important to understand how these numbers are made, what makes them special and what should come to mind when we read “composite numbers.”

Principle: Every composite number is made up of 2 or more prime numbers. The prime numbers could be the same or they could be distinct.

For example:

2*2 = 4 (Composite number)

2*3*11 = 66 (Composite number)

5*23 = 115 (Composite number)

and so on…

Look at any composite number. You will always be able to split it into 2 or more prime numbers (not necessarily distinct). For example:

72 = 2*2*2*3*3

140 = 2*2*5*7

166 = 2*83

and so on…

This principle does look quite simple and intuitive at first, but when tested, we could face problems because we don’t think much about it. Let’s look at it with the help of one of our 700+ level GMAT questions:

x is the smallest integer greater than 1000 that is not prime and that has only one factor in common with 30!. What is x?

(A) 1009

(B) 1021

(C) 1147

(D) 1273

(E) 50! + 1

If we start with the answer choices, the way we often do when dealing with prime/composite numbers, we will get stuck. If we were looking for a prime number, we would use the method of elimination – we would find factors of all other numbers and the number that was left over would be the prime number.

But in this question, we are instead looking for a composite number – a specific composite number – and some of the answer choices are probably prime. Try as we might, we will not find a factor for them, and by the time we realize that it is prime, we will have wasted a lot of precious time. Let’s start from the question stem, instead.

We need a composite number that has only one factor in common with 30!. Every positive integer will have 1 as a factor, as will 30!, hence the only factor our answer and 30! will have in common is 1.

30! = 1*2*3*…*28*29*30

30! is the product of all integers from 1 to 30, so all prime numbers less than 30 are factors of 30!.

To make a composite number which has no prime factor in common with 30!, we must use prime numbers greater than 30. The first prime number greater than 30 is 31.

(As an aside, note that if we were looking for the smallest number with no factor other than 1 in common with 31!, we would skip to 37. All integers between 31 and 37 are composite and hence, would have factors lying between 1 and 31. Similarly, if we were looking for the smallest number with no factor other than 1 in common with 50!, 53 would be the answer.)

Let’s get back to our question. If we want to make a composite number without using any primes until 30, we must use two or more prime numbers greater than 30, and the smallest prime greater than 30 is 31. If we use two 31’s to get the smallest composite number, we get 31*31 = 961 But 961 is not greater than 1000, so it cannot be our answer.

So, let’s find the next prime number after 31 – it is 37. Multiplying 31 and 37, we get 31*37 = 1147. This is the smallest composite number greater than 1000 with no prime factors in common with 30! – the only factor it has in common with 30! is 1. Therefore, our answer is (C).

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: How to Find Composite Numbers on the GMAT appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Go to page   Previous    1  ...  47   48   49   50   51   52   53  ...  75    Next  [ 1489 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Admissions Consulting Updates from Veritas Prep

  new topic post reply Update application status  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne