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Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”

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Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2017, 08:48
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Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starring in many movies as an impeccably dressed profession, and, accordingly, he entitled his autobiography “It Took Nine Tailors.”

(A) known for being the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starring
(B) known to be the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starred
(C) known to be the “most well-dressed man in America” in many years, starred
(D) known as the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starred
(E) known as the “most well-dressed man in America” in many years, starring

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Re: Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2017, 08:56
Saw the OA to be D . Can any expert please help me differentiate between KNOWN AS and KNOWN TO BE.

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Re: Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2017, 08:57
Mahmud6 wrote:
Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starring in many movies as an impeccably dressed profession, and, accordingly, he entitled his autobiography “It Took Nine Tailors.”

(A) known for being the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starring
(B) known to be the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starred
(C) known to be the “most well-dressed man in America” in many years, starred
(D) known as the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starred
(E) known as the “most well-dressed man in America” in many years, starring


"known for being" and "known to be" are awkward. Eliminate A, B and C.

In E, "starring" is wrong since this choice makes the sentence lack of main verb. D is the correct answer.
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Re: Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2017, 10:01
This questions is testing the difference between 'known as' and 'known to be'.

"known as" indicates an alias or nickname, whereas "known to be" indicates a characteristic.

For example : The artist formerly known AS Prince was known TO BE provocative.

As per the meaning, this person is known as most well dressed man in America. Hence, known as is the correct form.

(A) known for being the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starring --> Missing verb mistake + wrong Idiom.

(B) known to be the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starred --> Already explained.

(C) known to be the “most well-dressed man in America” in many years, starred --> Same as B.

(D) known as the “most well-dressed man in America” for many years, starred

(E) known as the “most well-dressed man in America” in many years, starring --> Missing Verb Mistake
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Re: Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2017, 22:04
OE

Split #1: idiom with “known“. Here, we are talking about a title, a role, so the most appropriate idiom is “known as“. The idioms “known for” and “known to” produce unnecessarily awkward constructions. Only choices (D) & (E) have this correct.

Split #2: the idiom with time. The prompt make it clear — Menjou held this distinction for a long duration of time. Many years refers to when he was holding the distinction: this is what “for many years” implies. It does not refer to an absence of sartorial splendor before him: that is what “in many years” would imply. Choices (C) & (E) use the incorrect idiom, and cannot be correct.

Split #3: missing verb mistake. After the word “and” is a complete independent clause, so we need a full independent clause before it. We have a subject, Adolphe Menjou, but the prompt has no verb for this subject. We need the verb “starred“, not the participle “starring“, to give this a full verb. Choices (A) & (E) make the “missing verb mistake,” and cannot be correct.

The only possible answer is (D).
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Re: Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 06:28
Imo D
Correct idiom is Known as and we have use completed verb not a gerund
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Re: Adolphe Menjou, known for being the “most well-dressed man in America”   [#permalink] 16 Jul 2017, 06:28
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