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Adverse selection may be making health insurance prohibitively expensi

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Adverse selection may be making health insurance prohibitively expensi  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2018, 01:00
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warrior1991 wrote:
visheshsahni wrote:
All correct!! The passage indeed tests how carefully you read Q3 rather than just selecting the answer.


Could you help me on Question #2


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum mobile app



It is best to tackle Q2 by negating the options.
A - those affected by the situation are clearly people with poor health. The situation is created by unconscious actions of people who have good health. So wrong
B - opposing party is rather strong term. Both parties are involved. But no one is against anyone. Even though situation makes it look like so but this is too strong option.
C - the affected group is still participating irrespective of increasing cost.
D - this option does focus on intentions of firms. But employee interests are something which can’t cause negative feedback loop. We don’t know how many employees are of good health.
E - understandable decisions like increasing the pool cost. Or healthy people withdrawing themselves from buying policies. As these things keep on increasing. Negative feedback loop feeds itself on and on.


Please ignore spelling mistakes if any! Wrote this on phone’s browser.

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Re: Adverse selection may be making health insurance prohibitively expensi  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 16:14
1

Official Solution (Credit: Manhattan Prep)



The “negative feedback loop” mentioned in the second sentence can best be described as a situation in which

those affected by that situation intentionally created the situation in the first place

opposing parties cannot come to consensus or solve a problem

the affected groups can no longer afford to participate in that situation

companies make decisions based upon business interests as opposed to employee interests

a series of understandable decisions continually escalates in a damaging manner
The second and third sentences state: “In this negative feedback loop, rising insurance premiums cause the healthiest consumers to opt out of their plans, increasing the average risk of the pool. Insurers raise prices to offset that increased risk and the cycle begins again.” The “loop,” then, is a series of steps that form a continuous cycle. The “negative” part has to do with the continually increasing risks and costs: the risk rises when healthier consumers drop out, leading to higher costs, leading to more consumer drop-outs, and so on.

(A) While it is true that the decisions made by consumers and insurance companies do result in the negative feedback loop described in the passage, the parties involved are not “intentionally” creating a negative feedback loop of rising risks and costs. The negative feedback loop is a consequence of decisions made for other reasons.

(B) The passage does not indicate that consensus-building could solve any problem; indeed, the passage does not discuss how this negative feedback loop might be alleviated at all.

(C) The first sentence does say that this negative feedback loop “may [make] insurance prohibitively expensive” but it does not say that insurance definitely will become unaffordable; the only thing we know for sure is that the costs will rise. Further, this choice refers to the affected groups, plural; the insurance companies will still participate, and even the healthier consumers may still be able to afford to participate (but choose not to do so).

(D) The insurance companies do make decisions based upon business interests, but the concept of “employee interests” is not applicable to the negative feedback loop. The negative feedback loop, in this example, describes those who are buying individual insurance, not those who receive insurance through an employer.

(E) CORRECT. The second and third sentences describe a series of reasonable decisions made by each party (healthier consumers opting out to save money, insurers raising premiums because of the increased risk), but the collective set of decisions results in a worsening situation as the cycle continues.
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Adverse selection may be making health insurance prohibitively expensi  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 16:14
1

Official Solution (Credit: Manhattan Prep)



The primary purpose of the passage is to

advocate for change on behalf of a particular group

make and support a claim

introduce recently discovered information

challenge a widely accepted explanation

argue that a situation is morally wrong
The first sentence begins with the claim that “adverse selection may be making health insurance prohibitively expensive for the unemployed.” The rest of the first half of the paragraph explains how adverse selection works for those buying individual health insurance. The second half explains why those who are employed are not subject to this phenomenon.

(A) The author of the passage does not advocate on behalf of any particular group, but rather explains a situation faced by both consumers and insurance companies.

(B) CORRECT. The first sentence makes a particular claim. The rest of the paragraph is designed to support that claim.

(C) The information presented is not described as “recently discovered.”

(D) The passage does not discuss a widely accepted explanation, nor does the passage challenge any particular idea or explanation.

(E) The passage does not assert that the situation discussed is “morally wrong"; rather, it just explains how the situation occurs.
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Re: Adverse selection may be making health insurance prohibitively expensi  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 16:15

Official Solution (Credit: Manhattan Prep)



The passage states which of the following about the cost of health care?

It is generally higher for people with poor health.

It is generally higher for full-time workers.

It is not fairly priced in the current market.

It has been rising in recent years.

The lower the average risk of the employee pool, the less it costs.
The majority of the passage concerns health insurance costs, which are distinct from the costs of the underlying health care itself. The author discusses the cost of health care only in the middle of the paragraph, explaining that healthy consumers incur lower-than-average health care costs, while consumers in poor health incur higher-than-average costs.

(A) CORRECT. The fifth sentence of the passage states that “consumers in poorer health…have higher-than-average health care costs.”

(B) The passage does not compare the cost of health care for full-time workers to that for any other segment of the population. The only distinction made in the passage is between the employed and the unemployed, and then only in terms of health insurance costs.

(C) Although the passage does discuss the potentially high cost of health care insurance for the unemployed, the passage does not assert that the cost of health care itself is unfair.

(D) The passage does not discuss any changes in health care costs over time; the only rising costs discussed have to do with insurance.

(E) Though we are specifically told that insurance premiums are lower if the average risk of the employee pool is lower, we are told nothing about the cost of health care.
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Re: Adverse selection may be making health insurance prohibitively expensi &nbs [#permalink] 20 Sep 2018, 16:15

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