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Advocates argue that five-cent bottle deposits charged on

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Joined: 31 Jan 2016
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Re: Advocates argue that five-cent bottle deposits charged on [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2016, 20:13
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The way the question is worded confused me, but through POE, D seemed like the correct choice.

This is the explanation for the solution on Veritas

Correct answer: D This is a resolve the paradox question. In this question you are asked to explain why the states without a bottle deposit program had more success in implementing a comprehensive recycling program. This is surprising because a bottle deposit program provides a strong incentive for people to recycle plastic, glass, and aluminum beverage containers. Choice D is the correct answer. Remember, you are trying to explain why states without a bottle deposit program had more “success in implementing a comprehensive recycling program.” Choice D indicates that Aluminum cans will “pay for costs of the entire comprehensive recycling program” when they are included, rather than being taken out of the recycling stream and into a separate beverage bottle deposit program; this points to greater success in implementing a comprehensive program.

Choice A is interesting and tempting. If the bottle deposit programs are not convenient and not popular then this would impact people’s motivation. However, even if unpopular these laws provide a “strong incentive for people to recycle these containers. So this does not explain why states without this program would have more success. Choice B cannot be the answer because you cannot explain why one thing is more successful simply by pointing to something that the two programs have in common. If I want to explain why you are more successful on the GMAT than I am I cannot say that we each get 75 minutes for the Verbal section. Choice C points in the wrong direction. It indicates a reason why the states with the bottle deposit program would be more successful. Choice E indicates that there are more states with bottle deposit programs but this does not tell us why these states are not as successful.

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Re: Advocates argue that five-cent bottle deposits [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2016, 08:52
souvik101990 wrote:
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Advocates argue that five-cent bottle deposits charged on beverage containers are necessary for environmental protection because they help to ensure that plastic and glass bottles as well as aluminium cans are recycled. This is, the advocates say, because the five-cent redemption programs provide a strong incentive to return the used containers to recycling facilities. However, a recent study found that states without a bottle deposit had more success in implementing comprehensive recycling programs, which include paper, plastics, and steel, in addition to the beverage containers, than did states with a bottle deposit law.

The answer to which of the following questions would be most useful in analyzing the significance of the study referenced above?

A) Did any of the states surveyed lose revenue on the bottle deposit program?
B) Do the citizens of the states that were studied prefer five-cent redemption programs on beverage containers?
C) When the five-cent deposit programs were implemented, were the citizens of the states that began programs as enthusiastic about recycling as the citizens of the other states?
D) Did citizens of the states with and without bottle deposit programs purchase comparable numbers of beverages in plastic, glass and aluminum containers?
E) Where the bottle deposit and comprehensive recycling programs given equal funding?


oh wow...tough choice...I picked C, and saw the results 43% - C, 43%-D
I see why D is tempting...the greater the consumption, the higher the probability of recycled products.
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Re: Advocates argue that five-cent bottle deposits charged on [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2017, 12:24
A :- program for beverage containerswith five-cent bottle deposits charged on beverage containers for bottles recycling.
B :- program paper, plastics, and steel, in addition to the beverage containers

B is more successful than doing A alone
so basically A+B not more than B
thus A has not added any value.
D straight
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Re: Advocates argue that five-cent bottle deposits charged on [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2017, 10:19
In an Inference question, the correct answer must be true. Accordingly, you should hold every answer choice up to that test: if it could be false, then you can eliminated it.
Choice A here is probably true, but not guaranteed: the coach says that even the most unbelievable records will LIKELY be broken, but not that they will all be broken. Note that predictions are very hard to make in Inference questions, as much like your insurance policy they're subject to the "act of god" clause - if a meteor hits the earth and wipes out humankind, then no world records will ever be broken!
Choice B is similarly incorrect: true champions know that records will likely broken, but that doesn't mean that they cannot make predictions about whether their record is one of the few that may never be broken.
Choice C may look tempting, but look back at what the Olympic champion says: "I'm not sure" the record will ever be broken. This stops short of saying "it will not be broken," so you cannot conclusively say that he is not a true champion.
Choice D goes just a bit too far, again because the coach's point is that records will likely be broken, which is a bit short of saying that all will be broken.
Choice E is correct, in large part because of the adequately-measured wording "could be broken." Since any true champion knows that a record could be broken, if a champion does not at least think that the record could be broken he then does not fit that definition of a true champion.
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Re: Advocates argue that five-cent bottle deposits charged on   [#permalink] 19 Aug 2017, 10:19

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