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Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday,

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Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2005, 06:18
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Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, the strong retail sales figures released today seem like it is indicative that the economy, although growing slowly, is not nearing a recession.

(A) like it is indicative that
(B) as if to indicate
(C) to indicate that
(D) indicative of
(E) like an indication of

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Re: Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2015, 16:06
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2015, 13:08
honchos wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
mun23 wrote:
Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, the strong retail sales figures released today seem like it is indicative that the economy, although growing slowly, is not nearing a recession.

(A) like it is indicative that
(B) as if to indicate
(C) to indicate that
(D) indicative of
(E) like an indication of


I picked (C). Can anyone help me in explaining me whats wrong with (B) & (D)?

Dear Mun,

I'm happy to help with this. :-)


You see, first of all, grammar is only one of the considerations on the SC. Both (B) & (D) are grammatically correct. The problem with them ---- they are clunky, wordy, indirect, weak. By contrast, (C) is sleek, powerful, and direct. This questions falls under a rubric known as "Rhetorical Construction" --- this is actually one of the most tested topics on the GMAT SC. Even if an answer choice is grammatically correct, in order to be correct on the sentence correction, it must be clear, concise, direct, and powerful.

One of biggest hints for achieving this --- whenever you have a split between the noun & verb & adjective of the same verb (as we have in this question), choose the verb. Writing a word in its verb form instead of in its noun or adjective form almost always makes the sentence more concise and more direct.

Does all this make sense?

Mike :-)


Read discussion on Magoosh site. I am a non native speaker failed to comprehend the Idea.



I am not a big fan of Idioms; this question can be answered by reasoning Verb over Action noun formation.
Ex.(quoting from MGMAT)
His conception of money was as a goal. (bad sentence according to GMAT)
He conceived of money as a goal. (better sentence according to GMAT)

Both are grammatically correct otherwise.

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Re: Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2016, 10:43
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

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Re: Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2017, 12:54
ywilfred wrote:
Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, the strong retail sales figures released today seem like it is indicative that the economy, although growing slowly, is not nearing a recession.

(A) like it is indicative that
(B) as if to indicate
(C) to indicate that
(D) indicative of
(E) like an indication of


A "It" is ambiguous.
B Missing "that."
C Correct.
D Missing "that."
E "Of" cannot introduce a new clause.

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Re: Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2017, 09:00
ywilfred wrote:
Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, the strong retail sales figures released today seem like it is indicative that the economy, although growing slowly, is not nearing a recession.

(A) like it is indicative that
(B) as if to indicate
(C) to indicate that
(D) indicative of
(E) like an indication of


A "Seems like" cannot introduce a relative clause.
B "Seems as if" cannot be followed by an infinitive.
C Correct.
D "Indicative of" cannot introduce a relative clause.
E "Indicative of" cannot introduce a relative clause.

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Re: Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2017, 12:42
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Why a clause cannot follow 'of'?
Because 'of' is a preposition and can be only be followed by a noun or noun-phrase without a verb.
Why a clause always follows 'that'?
Because 'that' is subordinating conjunction here and can only be followed by a clause with a verb.
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Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday, [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2017, 13:15
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Quote:
the economy, although growing slowly, is not nearing a recession.


GMAT has put the although part in the un-underlined part and thus has made its intention clear that 'although' need not be followed by a clause. The matter should rest there, but still, the following tips might be handy.

1. If although starts a sentence, then although part can be either a verbed clause or a verb - less modifier.

Examples:
A. Although I didn't do well in my GMAT, I got 700 -- A verbed clause started by the conjunction although.
B. Although tired at the end of the Quants section, I did the verbal spiritedly and got a score of V42. --- Although part as a verb-less adjectival modifier. Tired is a past participle and not a verb.

2. If although part intervened in the middle of a sentence, then it can only be a verb-less modifier.
Example:
The economy, although growing slowly, is not nearing a recession.

3. If although part completes a sentence, then it can only be a verbed clause

Example: I did the verbal spiritedly and got a score of V42 although I became tired at the end of the Quants section --Verbed clause after although
Please note we cannot say: I did the verbal spiritedly and got a score of V42 although tired at the end of the Quants section. This is wrong.

I remember to have seen or heard these tips from RON although I can't remember where and when.
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Along with the drop in producer prices announced yesterday,   [#permalink] 18 May 2017, 13:15

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