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Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no

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Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2009, 08:55
3
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A
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74% (01:08) correct 26% (01:18) wrong based on 323 sessions

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11. Although it’s a common perception that philosophy has no practical application to the real world, history suggests otherwise. In fact, the word “philosophy” itself derives from the Greek roots philos, meaning “love”, and sophos, which means “wisdom”. Taken together, the word “philosophy” literally means “love of wisdom.”

The bolded phrases play which of the following roles in the argument above?

The first phrase states the conclusion and the second phrase offers support for that conclusion.
The first phrase introduces evidence supporting a conclusion, and the second phrase contains that evidence.
The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception, and the second phrase offers support for that objection.
The first phrase states a premise on which the conclusion is based, and the second phrase offers a supporting definition.
The first phrase defines a word crucial to the argument, and the second phrase states the conclusion.
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Re: Cr - Boldface  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2009, 02:13
IEsailor wrote:
11. Although it’s a common perception that philosophy has no practical application to the real world, history suggests otherwise. In fact, the word “philosophy” itself derives from the Greek roots philos, meaning “love”, and sophos, which means “wisdom”. Taken together, the word “philosophy” literally means “love of wisdom.”

The bolded phrases play which of the following roles in the argument above?

The first phrase states the conclusion and the second phrase offers support for that conclusion.
The first phrase introduces evidence supporting a conclusion, and the second phrase contains that evidence.
The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception, and the second phrase offers support for that objection.
The first phrase states a premise on which the conclusion is based, and the second phrase offers a supporting definition.
The first phrase defines a word crucial to the argument, and the second phrase states the conclusion.




Choose C here.

First contains objection - history suggests otherwise. Second supports that objection.
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Re: Cr - Boldface  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2010, 15:03
what is the conclusion in the above arguement?
If its "history suggests otherwise" then A can be considered as a better option as second bold faced statement seems to support the first bold faced statement, which might be the conclusion.
Please correct me if I am wrong.
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Re: Cr - Boldface  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2011, 20:12
+1 for C.

A and C were the two strong contenders. C won because it used "common perception". which is how the argument introduces the conclusion.

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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2012, 15:46
My vote is for C.

In my opinion, the author does not draw any conclusion from this argument. He is making an opinion and supporting that opinion with a defenition
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2012, 21:38
I also choose C, and I found no conclusion in this argument, IMO
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2012, 23:34
IEsailor wrote:
11. Although it’s a common perception that philosophy has no practical application to the real world, history suggests otherwise. In fact, the word “philosophy” itself derives from the Greek roots philos, meaning “love”, and sophos, which means “wisdom”. Taken together, the word “philosophy” literally means “love of wisdom.”

The bolded phrases play which of the following roles in the argument above?

The first phrase states the conclusion and the second phrase offers support for that conclusion.
The first phrase introduces evidence supporting a conclusion, and the second phrase contains that evidence.
The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception, and the second phrase offers support for that objection.
The first phrase states a premise on which the conclusion is based, and the second phrase offers a supporting definition.
The first phrase defines a word crucial to the argument, and the second phrase states the conclusion.



I chose C but I think both the statements are so tangential to each other that it's hard to justify And provide reasoning as to why I chose this option. Really don't understand how the second statement " the word “philosophy” literally means “love of wisdom.” " offers support for " history suggests otherwise" can anyone please explain?
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2012, 01:25
sandgob wrote:
IEsailor wrote:
11. Although it’s a common perception that philosophy has no practical application to the real world, history suggests otherwise. In fact, the word “philosophy” itself derives from the Greek roots philos, meaning “love”, and sophos, which means “wisdom”. Taken together, the word “philosophy” literally means “love of wisdom.”

The bolded phrases play which of the following roles in the argument above?

The first phrase states the conclusion and the second phrase offers support for that conclusion.
The first phrase introduces evidence supporting a conclusion, and the second phrase contains that evidence.
The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception, and the second phrase offers support for that objection.
The first phrase states a premise on which the conclusion is based, and the second phrase offers a supporting definition.
The first phrase defines a word crucial to the argument, and the second phrase states the conclusion.



I chose C but I think both the statements are so tangential to each other that it's hard to justify And provide reasoning as to why I chose this option. Really don't understand how the second statement " the word “philosophy” literally means “love of wisdom.” " offers support for " history suggests otherwise" can anyone please explain?


As discussed earlier there is no conclusion in the argument. C is a major contender here because ' the first phrase contains an objection' is pretty straight forward to identify, even though the etymology of philosophy may not necessarily be a supporting point to the objection it is definitely a base or a beginning for the argument that ensues! thats' what helped me get the answer. hope that helped.
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2012, 03:27
shreya717 wrote:

As discussed earlier there is no conclusion in the argument. C is a major contender here because ' the first phrase contains an objection' is pretty straight forward to identify, even though the etymology of philosophy may not necessarily be a supporting point to the objection it is definitely a base or a beginning for the argument that ensues! thats' what helped me get the answer. hope that helped.


rite.. i hope i don't get questions like these in the actual GMAT. Thanks buddy :)
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2012, 09:08
The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception, and the second phrase offers support for that objection.

Suggests otherwise - The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception,

"Love of Wisdom" - and the second phrase offers support for that objection.
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2012, 09:08
The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception, and the second phrase offers support for that objection.

Suggests otherwise - The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception,

"Love of Wisdom" - and the second phrase offers support for that objection.

So C it is
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2012, 02:03
Arguement:
Philosophy has practical application to the real world.

Conclusion:
None I suppose

First bold statement is an objection to the common thinking about philosophy.
Second bold statement puts forth information in support to the objection stated in the first bold statement.

C - Statisfies the both conditions.
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2012, 16:57
+1 C

However, I think this is not a Gmat question.
The objection is the conclusion of this argument. A would be correct too.
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2012, 04:16
C seems right. Though i was also confused that A might be the answer.
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2012, 04:46
IMO C,

Fastest way to arrive at C is that C is only option that does not mention the word "conclusion". There is, in fact, no conclusion in the given argument.

The first phrase states the conclusion and the second phrase offers support for that conclusion.
first one is not a conclusion, it is just a statement made without any support. It is a premise.

The first phrase introduces evidence supporting a conclusion, and the second phrase contains that evidence.
Same as above

The first phrase contains an objection to a common perception, and the second phrase offers support for that objection.
Correct

The first phrase states a premise on which the conclusion is based, and the second phrase offers a supporting definition.
Same as first

The first phrase defines a word crucial to the argument, and the second phrase states the conclusion.
2nd is not a conclusion
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2012, 10:18
good question and great explanation... thanks...
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New post 16 Jul 2012, 22:28
I think it is B.

The conclusion here is that philosophy is a practical science. 'History suggest otherwise' introduces the evidence supporting this conclusion and the last line gives that conclusion.

Thoughts from anybody?
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2017, 22:16
IMO C.The first sentence object the common perception and the second phrase supports it.
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 03:41
C---
1st part shattering assumption/common perception
2nd part is further explaining or supporting 1st bold part
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Re: Although it s a common perception that philosophy has no &nbs [#permalink] 10 Jan 2018, 03:41
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