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Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule,

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Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule,  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2006, 16:27
1
8
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A
B
C
D
E

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Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts. Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one, turning on a detail of procedure rather than on the abrogation of some fundamental liberty, and even when it has been clear that the police officers were acting in good faith, the evidence obtained has been considered tainted under this rule and may not even by introduced. In consequence, defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again.
The author of the passage above assumes all of the following EXCEPT:
(A) The constitutional rights of criminal defendants should be protected.
(B) Most cases in which the exclusionary rule has been invoked have involved purely technical violations of constitutional principles.
(C) The number of cases whose outcome has been affected by the exclusionary rule is significant.
(D) Some of the defendants set free under the exclusionary rule have been guilty of serious criminal offenses.
(E) Merely technical violations of the rules concerning evidence should be treated differently from deliberate assaults upon human rights.
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New post 07 May 2006, 03:23
I think its B too... considered C, but its says "has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts" which means it shud be significant.
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New post 07 May 2006, 03:28
"even when" does not mean "most cases".

My pick is (B)
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New post 11 May 2006, 00:08
I think it may be both A and B:
A – Author never mentions anything related to his attitude toward constitutional rights.
B – While it is true that some cases that invoked this rule have involved purely technical violations, the author doesn’t give us any information about the proportion of this cases.
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New post 11 May 2006, 17:59
I believe it is C.

In my opinion, the author assumes B because if you look at the conclusion, it is stating criminals, because of this rule, get to go free and rape, kill, pillage, etc. As such, it is assumes that most criminals are set free because evidence is being excluded based on "technical reasons." If you negate C, you are weakening the conclusion.

Please someone disagrees, please respond. This is the BEST way to learn. :-D
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New post 11 May 2006, 20:08
I'll go with B.
It is clearly stated in the passage that there are a few technical cases.
Agree with Matt's explaination.
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Re: CR: eclusionary rule  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2006, 14:46
prude_sb wrote:
Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts. Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one, turning on a detail of procedure rather than on the abrogation of some fundamental liberty, and even when it has been clear that the police officers were acting in good faith, the evidence obtained has been considered tainted under this rule and may not even by introduced. In consequence, defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again.
The author of the passage above assumes all of the following EXCEPT:
(A) The constitutional rights of criminal defendants should be protected.
(B) Most cases in which the exclusionary rule has been invoked have involved purely technical violations of constitutional principles.
(C) The number of cases whose outcome has been affected by the exclusionary rule is significant.
(D) Some of the defendants set free under the exclusionary rule have been guilty of serious criminal offenses.
(E) Merely technical violations of the rules concerning evidence should be treated differently from deliberate assaults upon human rights.


I feel like C, too,, Can you give us the OA?? pls~
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Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2014, 05:14
Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts. Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one, turning on a detail of procedure rather than on the abrogation of some fundamental liberty, and even when it has been clear that the police officers were acting in good faith, the evidence obtained has been considered tainted under this rule and may not even by introduced. In consequence, defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again.

It can be inferred from the passage that the author would most likely endorse which of the following proposals?

(A) Change of the exclusionary rule to admit evidence obtained by police officers acting in good faith
(B) A constitutional amendment curtailing some of the protections traditionally afforded those accused of a crime
(C) A statute limiting the application of the exclusionary rule to cases involving minor criminal offenses
(D) Change of the exclusionary rule to allow any evidence, no matter how obtained, to be introduced in court
(E) A constitutional amendment allowing police officers to obtain vital evidence by any means necessary when in pursuit of a known criminal
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Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2014, 07:26
rishabchoraria wrote:
Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts. Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one, turning on a detail of procedure rather than on the abrogation of some fundamental liberty, and even when it has been clear that the police officers were acting in good faith, the evidence obtained has been considered tainted under this rule and may not even by introduced. In consequence, defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again.

It can be inferred from the passage that the author would most likely endorse which of the following proposals?

(A) Change of the exclusionary rule to admit evidence obtained by police officers acting in good faith
(B) A constitutional amendment curtailing some of the protections traditionally afforded those accused of a crime
(C) A statute limiting the application of the exclusionary rule to cases involving minor criminal offenses
(D) Change of the exclusionary rule to allow any evidence, no matter how obtained, to be introduced in court
(E) A constitutional amendment allowing police officers to obtain vital evidence by any means necessary when in pursuit of a known criminal



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Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule,  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2016, 13:16
what is the OA for this question? Anyone...?
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Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule,  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2018, 05:03
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, &nbs [#permalink] 01 Aug 2018, 05:03
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