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Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for

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Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Dec 2016, 22:47
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Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing, the Surgeon General assured the reporters that his large-scale treatment plan would bring the spread of the disease under control.

A. has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing
B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing
C. had fueled fears for a full blown epidemic in progress
D. has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress
E. fueled fears of how a full blown epidemic is in progress

Originally posted by Mo2men on 17 Nov 2016, 08:59.
Last edited by bb on 06 Dec 2016, 22:47, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2016, 13:11
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OreoShake wrote:
how can the fear fueling happen in present perfect, and the assuring happen in past? has fueled fears.... the surgeon general assured???? This does not make sense, can experts pitch in please?

Oreo

Dear OreoShake,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I am not sure what the problem is. Present perfect = event started in the past, continues to present moment. Let's say Event #1 started two weeks ago and continues now: we would use the present perfect. If event #2 occurred yesterday, we would use the past. Example:
It has been raining for two weeks straight, and yesterday my friend said he would build an Ark.
The implication of the present perfect is that the rain continues to this present moment, while the friend's remark is in the past.

In this SC question, the "fear fueling" started in the past and continue to the present. The "assuring" happened at one point in the past, say, yesterday---in the past, but not as far back as before the beginning of the action in the present perfect.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2016, 09:23
A. has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing - Incorrect. Illogical. 'fear for' is not suitable in the given context.

B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing - Incorrect. Tense error.

C. had fueled fears for a full blown epidemic in progress - Incorrect. Same error as in A.

D. has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress - Correct.

E. fueled fears of how a full blown epidemic is in progress - Incorrect. Awkward.

Answer: D
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2016, 09:40
Mo2men wrote:
Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing, the Surgeon General assured the reporters that his large-scale treatment plan would bring the spread of the disease under control.

A. has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing
B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing
C. had fueled fears for a full blown epidemic in progress
D. has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress
E. fueled fears of how a full blown epidemic is in progress


Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress, the Surgeon General assured the reporters that his large-scale treatment plan would bring the spread of the disease under control.

Correct answer must be (D) for the correct usage of S-V agreement usage...
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2016, 12:32
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Mo2men wrote:
Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing, the Surgeon General assured the reporters that his large-scale treatment plan would bring the spread of the disease under control.

A. has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing
B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing
C. had fueled fears for a full blown epidemic in progress
D. has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress
E. fueled fears of how a full blown epidemic is in progress

I'm happy to respond to this thread, as I am the author of this question. :-)

This is hard question. Only about 59% of Magoosh students get this right: KeepCalmAdi, viditmalhotra89 , Vyshak, and Abhishek009 all have nailed this tough question. Congratulations!

Mike :-)
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2016, 22:35
how can the fear fueling happen in present perfect, and the assuring happen in past? has fueled fears.... the surgeon general assured???? This does not make sense, can experts pitch in please?

Oreo
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2016, 21:11
mikemcgarry wrote:
OreoShake wrote:
how can the fear fueling happen in present perfect, and the assuring happen in past? has fueled fears.... the surgeon general assured???? This does not make sense, can experts pitch in please?

Oreo

Dear OreoShake,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I am not sure what the problem is. Present perfect = event started in the past, continues to present moment. Let's say Event #1 started two weeks ago and continues now: we would use the present perfect. If event #2 occurred yesterday, we would use the past. Example:
It has been raining for two weeks straight, and yesterday my friend said he would build an Ark.
The implication of the present perfect is that the rain continues to this present moment, while the friend's remark is in the past.

In this SC question, the "fear fueling" started in the past and continue to the present. The "assuring" happened at one point in the past, say, yesterday---in the past, but not as far back as before the beginning of the action in the present perfect.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Mike, thanks for clearing this. For some reason I was placing the 'assuring' before the 'fear fueling' in the timeline. Thanks a ton. :)
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2016, 22:48
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Thank you for the report. The underline has been fixed.
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2016, 17:38
mikemcgarry wrote:
OreoShake wrote:
how can the fear fueling happen in present perfect, and the assuring happen in past? has fueled fears.... the surgeon general assured???? This does not make sense, can experts pitch in please?

Oreo

Dear OreoShake,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I am not sure what the problem is. Present perfect = event started in the past, continues to present moment. Let's say Event #1 started two weeks ago and continues now: we would use the present perfect. If event #2 occurred yesterday, we would use the past. Example:
It has been raining for two weeks straight, and yesterday my friend said he would build an Ark.
The implication of the present perfect is that the rain continues to this present moment, while the friend's remark is in the past.

In this SC question, the "fear fueling" started in the past and continue to the present. The "assuring" happened at one point in the past, say, yesterday---in the past, but not as far back as before the beginning of the action in the present perfect.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Does the GMAT agree with this rationale? I mean I would rather say 'It HAD been raining for two weeks straight, and yesterday my friend said he would build an Ark'. Is there example from OG that can be provided to substantiate this?
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2016, 18:16
'It has been raining' is present perfect continuous which definitely shows that the action that started in past is still continued. Present perfect says that the action recently completed.
mikemcgarry wrote:
OreoShake wrote:
how can the fear fueling happen in present perfect, and the assuring happen in past? has fueled fears.... the surgeon general assured???? This does not make sense, can experts pitch in please?

Oreo

Dear OreoShake,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I am not sure what the problem is. Present perfect = event started in the past, continues to present moment. Let's say Event #1 started two weeks ago and continues now: we would use the present perfect. If event #2 occurred yesterday, we would use the past. Example:
It has been raining for two weeks straight, and yesterday my friend said he would build an Ark.
The implication of the present perfect is that the rain continues to this present moment, while the friend's remark is in the past.

In this SC question, the "fear fueling" started in the past and continue to the present. The "assuring" happened at one point in the past, say, yesterday---in the past, but not as far back as before the beginning of the action in the present perfect.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)



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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2017, 20:14
Hi!

Can sombody explain to me why A is wrong? IMO, "progressing" correctly modifies the preceding noun "epidemic".



Many thanks!
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Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2017, 10:50
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leanhdung wrote:
Hi!

Can sombody explain to me why A is wrong? IMO, "progressing" correctly modifies the preceding noun "epidemic".

Many thanks!


here you need to look to 2 things:

Verb tense which is great in A but the idiom 'fear for' is wrong.

the below explained by Mitch (GMAT instructor)

X fears for Y.
Conveyed meaning:
X believes that Y is in danger.
Mary fears for John.
Conveyed meaning:
Mary believes that John is in danger.

X has a fear of Y.
Conveyed meaning:
Y scares X.
Mary has a fear of flying.
Conveyed meaning:
The act of flying scares Mary.

X fears that Y.
Conveyed meaning:
X is worried that the event described in the that-clause has happened, is happening, or will happen.
Mary fears that John will be late.
Conveyed meaning:
Mary is worried that John will be late.

So the meaning of 'fear for' in choice A is nonsensical.

I hope it helps
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Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2017, 19:20
Mo2men wrote:
leanhdung wrote:
Hi!

Can sombody explain to me why A is wrong? IMO, "progressing" correctly modifies the preceding noun "epidemic".

Many thanks!


here you need to look to 2 things:

Verb tense which is great in A but the idiom 'fear for' is wrong.

the below explained by Mitch (GMAT instructor)

X fears for Y.
Conveyed meaning:
X believes that Y is in danger.
Mary fears for John.
Conveyed meaning:
Mary believes that John is in danger.

X has a fear of Y.
Conveyed meaning:
Y scares X.
Mary has a fear of flying.
Conveyed meaning:
The act of flying scares Mary.

X fears that Y.
Conveyed meaning:
X is worried that the event described in the that-clause has happened, is happening, or will happen.
Mary fears that John will be late.
Conveyed meaning:
Mary is worried that John will be late.

So the meaning of 'fear for' in choice A is nonsensical.

I hope it helps


Yeah, I got this point!

B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing

Can you explain why B wrong? Is is because we use simple past tense and simple progressive tense simultaneously in the same clause?
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2017, 04:27
Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing, the Surgeon General assured the reporters that his large-scale treatment plan would bring the spread of the disease under control.

A. has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing
B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing
C. had fueled fears for a full blown epidemic in progress
D. has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress
E. fueled fears of how a full blown epidemic is in progress

had not correct C out
progressing nonsensical A and B are out
E how a full blown

D is correct
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Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2017, 02:56
leanhdung wrote:
Mo2men wrote:
leanhdung wrote:
Hi!

Can sombody explain to me why A is wrong? IMO, "progressing" correctly modifies the preceding noun "epidemic".

Many thanks!


here you need to look to 2 things:

Verb tense which is great in A but the idiom 'fear for' is wrong.

the below explained by Mitch (GMAT instructor)

X fears for Y.
Conveyed meaning:
X believes that Y is in danger.
Mary fears for John.
Conveyed meaning:
Mary believes that John is in danger.

X has a fear of Y.
Conveyed meaning:
Y scares X.
Mary has a fear of flying.
Conveyed meaning:
The act of flying scares Mary.

X fears that Y.
Conveyed meaning:
X is worried that the event described in the that-clause has happened, is happening, or will happen.
Mary fears that John will be late.
Conveyed meaning:
Mary is worried that John will be late.

So the meaning of 'fear for' in choice A is nonsensical.

I hope it helps


Yeah, I got this point!

B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing

Can you explain why B wrong? Is is because we use simple past tense and simple progressive tense simultaneously in the same clause?


No, using simple past and past continuous tense simultaneously is not the issue - the problem is with the simple past tense itself. The effect of fueling fear is still there, hence present perfect is better than simple past.

(Note: there is no tense called "simple progressive" - either it is simple or progressive, but cannot be both.)
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 11:49
the progressive tense in (B) is awkward: it's almost redundant to use the progressive tense to say that something "is progressing."

Also, many idioms of "fear"
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2018, 02:52
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Mo2men wrote:
Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing, the Surgeon General assured the reporters that his large-scale treatment plan would bring the spread of the disease under control.

A. has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing
B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing
C. had fueled fears for a full blown epidemic in progress
D. has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress
E. fueled fears of how a full blown epidemic is in progress


QA : D , that brings a clause , which refers to diseases and the idiom "is in progress" , I also reviewed option B , as there is a verb error , plus verb+ing , is not parallel with the sentence.
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Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2018, 08:03
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Magoosh Official Explanation:



Split #1: verb tense. The rise in cases of this disease is something that happened in the past, and may still be happening—that's unclear. Either the simple past "fueled" or present perfect "has fueled" could be correct—choices (A) & (B) & (D) & (E) have these. The past perfect would be correctly only if we wanted to establish contrast with another past event, but that doesn't make sense in this context: it changes the meaning too much. The past perfect "had fueled" is incorrect—choice (C) makes this mistake.

Also, the progressive tense in (B) is awkward: it's almost redundant to use the progressive tense to say that something "is progressing." Choice (B) is wrong.

Split #2: idiom with "fear."

When we are afraid of something happening, we need to use that: "the fear that X will do this."
When we are afraid of a single noun, we use of: "fear of flying", "fear of spiders", etc.
When we are afraid on behalf of something for which we have concern, then we use for: "I fear for my life", "I fear for the future of their marriage", etc.

Here, what is feared is the "full blown epidemic" and the fact that it may already be underway. Here, the "for" construction is entirely incorrect: choices (A) & (C) make this mistake and are incorrect. The "of" construction in (E) is acceptable. The other two choices have "that" clauses, which are correct.

These two splits leave us with (D) and (E). Choice (D) is sleek, elegant, and powerfully direct. Choice (E) is a dismally colloquial phrasing that does not stand up to logical analysis and would not bear examination in any respectable source of writing. Choice (E) is a complete disaster and is incorrect. Choice (D) is the best answer.
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2018, 07:05
this is a magoosh question and mikemcgarry is author of this question,

The first option "A" is "have fueled fears that there is a full blown epidemic in progress" being a magoosh student I can confirm this.

Can someone change this
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Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2018, 10:06
Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing, the Surgeon General assured the reporters that his large-scale treatment plan would bring the spread of the disease under control.

A. has fueled fears for a full blown epidemic progressing
B. fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is progressing
C. had fueled fears for a full blown epidemic in progress
D. has fueled fears that a full blown epidemic is in progress
E. fueled fears of how a full blown epidemic is in progress


MartyMurray

I can understand "D" is correct. But option C seems correct as well

the action "fueled fears" occurs before "assured". Don't we require to maintain a sequence of tenses??

I am not debating option D but i wanted to know why C is incorrect?
Re: Although the rise in incidence of the disease has fueled fears for &nbs [#permalink] 02 Aug 2018, 10:06

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