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Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in

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Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 29 Apr 2018, 05:10
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Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word “explosion” and use the phrase “energetic disassembly” instead. In fact, the word “explosion” elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, “explosion” is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term “explosion” outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.

(B) The phrase “energetic disassembly” has not so far been used as a substitute for the word “explosion” in the kind of discussion at issue.

(C) In any serious policy discussion, what is said by the participants is more important than how it is put into words.

(D) The only reason that people would have for using “energetic disassembly” in place of “explosion” is to render impossible any serious policy discussion concerning explosions.

(E) The phrase “energetic disassembly” is not necessarily out of place in describing a controlled rather than an accidental explosion.

Originally posted by amirdubai1982 on 09 Sep 2010, 04:23.
Last edited by hazelnut on 29 Apr 2018, 05:10, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2015, 23:08
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Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word “explosion” and use the phrase “energetic disassembly” instead. In fact, the word “explosion” elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, “explosion” is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term “explosion” outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.
(B) The phrase “energetic disassembly” has not so far been used as a substitute for the word “explosion” in the kind of discussion at issue.
(C) In any serious policy discussion, what is said by the participants is more important than how it is put into words.
(D) The only reason that people would have for using “energetic disassembly” in place of “explosion” is to render impossible any serious policy discussion concerning explosions.
(E) The phrase “energetic disassembly” is not necessarily out of place in describing a controlled rather than an accidental explosion
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2010, 06:24
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I used POE to get to A.

C, D & E are straight out, sort of irrelevant. Re-checking A & B, even B appeared irrelevant.

Plus, the statement emphasizes that the desirable impact is dependent on the word that is used; explosion or energetic disassembly". Hence, it is closer to A, which is emphasizing that advantages (desirable reactions).

The argument simply means - use of the word explosion has "desirable reactions" and "energetic ...." doesn't have the same impact. .............. one is more advantageous than the other ........
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2010, 06:45
I got A too through POE. I was debating between A and E then read the conclusion again to decide on A.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2011, 05:04
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amirdubai1982 wrote:
Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word “explosion” and use the phrase “energetic disassembly” instead. In fact, the word “explosion” elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, “explosion” is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term “explosion” outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.
(B) The phrase “energetic disassembly” has not so far been used as a substitute for the word “explosion” in the kind of discussion at issue.
(C) In any serious policy discussion, what is said by the participants is more important than how it is put into words.
(D) The only reason that people would have for using “energetic disassembly” in place of “explosion” is to render impossible any serious policy discussion concerning explosions.
(E) The phrase “energetic disassembly” is not necessarily out of place in describing a controlled rather than an accidental explosion

I am not able to paraphrase the argument pls help????

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OA: A


Paraphrase is: If you have to really discuss risks related to explosions, call explosions 'explosions' and not 'energetic dissembly', because only word explosion creates in audience reactions like serious attention which are required for serious discussion.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2011, 08:56
questioning why is just so apt here.
Why an explosion should be called with its original word has to be answered here. The heightened level of attentions is required but why ?

A clearly answers these and other options just don't even come close.

A it is.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jun 2011, 10:38
Coolasice81 wrote:
Hi
What is POE? :roll:


process of elimination.. to probability of correct answer is 20%(1 out of 5)
if we eliminate one wrong choice .. ur probability increases to 25% ( i out of 4) and so on....
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2015, 06:00
gmt1 wrote:
Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word “explosion” and use the phrase “energetic disassembly” instead. In fact, the word “explosion” elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, “explosion” is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term “explosion” outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.
(B) The phrase “energetic disassembly” has not so far been used as a substitute for the word “explosion” in the kind of discussion at issue.
(C) In any serious policy discussion, what is said by the participants is more important than how it is put into words.
(D) The only reason that people would have for using “energetic disassembly” in place of “explosion” is to render impossible any serious policy discussion concerning explosions.
(E) The phrase “energetic disassembly” is not necessarily out of place in describing a controlled rather than an accidental explosion



Do you have any explaination for AC A and E? E sounds nice too. I would have chosen E because if the term "energetic disassembly" is not ouf of place, then it is an issue to chose between the two terms ... so we have to assume that.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2015, 06:52
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The Argument doesnt talk anything about the types of explosion..hence its quite out of scope to include them
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2015, 23:31
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Use the word “Explosion” = desirable reactions = discussed well served
Use the word “Energetic disassembly” = NO desirable reactions = discussion Not well served

Conclusion: Use the word "Explosion" throughout in the discussion.

Possible assumptions:
1) Only those terms concerning "Desirable reactions" find place throughout the discussion.
2) Only those discussions that are well served are used throughout the discussion.

Choice A is correct.

P.S.: I had initially chosen choice C :( , but then I realised that it does not bridge the gap between the premise and conclusion, which is why to use the word "Explosion" throughout in the discussion.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2015, 16:19
Request you not to write your queries/answers/opinions in question window. It prevents ppl from analysing the question. The whole purpose of GMAT Club forum goes wasted by doing so.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2017, 11:22
Can anyone explain in detail why option E is not correct? :(
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2018, 11:58
Hello Experts,

I have gone through the discussion here , but, still could not capture the logic.Please help.

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New post 27 Aug 2018, 10:14
Not getting a single thing on this 700+ Assumption question. Especially the OA looks completely out of scope.
Moreover since this from GMAT paper test, I am finding it difficult to ignore and go ahead.

Experts, please help.
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Re: Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2018, 10:22
The key here is to look at what would happen if the opposite of (A) was true - would the argument still stand? The argument itself is that the word explosion gets more of a reaction than "energetic disassembly," and that the increased reaction is a good thing.

If (A) were to be negated, it would read something along the lines of "the advantages of the desirable reactions do NOT outweigh the disadvantages of the undesirable reactions." If this was true, the entire argument for using the word explosion would fall apart. You wouldn't use a word if the undesirable reactions were more intense than the desirable reactions. Because negating that statement seriously harms the argument's conclusion, it must be an assumption that the argument is built on.
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New post 27 Aug 2018, 10:33
LauraOrion wrote:
The key here is to look at what would happen if the opposite of (A) was true - would the argument still stand? The argument itself is that the word explosion gets more of a reaction than "energetic disassembly," and that the increased reaction is a good thing.

If (A) were to be negated, it would read something along the lines of "the advantages of the desirable reactions do NOT outweigh the disadvantages of the undesirable reactions." If this was true, the entire argument for using the word explosion would fall apart. You wouldn't use a word if the undesirable reactions were more intense than the desirable reactions. Because negating that statement seriously harms the argument's conclusion, it must be an assumption that the argument is built on.


Thank you very much...!!
I got confused/rather got sink in words.

A. In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term “explosion” outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.

Although, I read this twice or thrice, my mind was interpreting advantages of desirable reactions outweigh disadvantages of the same thing.
And then I went on thinking that option A is out of scope as argument never talk of disadvantages of desirable results.

Thanks for the quick response.

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New post 27 Aug 2018, 10:38
amirdubai1982 wrote:
Any serious policy discussion about acceptable levels of risk in connection with explosions is not well served if the participants fail to use the word “explosion” and use the phrase “energetic disassembly” instead. In fact, the word “explosion” elicits desirable reactions, such as a heightened level of attention, whereas the substitute phrase does not. Therefore, of the two terms, “explosion” is the one that should be used throughout discussions of this sort.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) In the kind of discussion at issue, the advantages of desirable reactions to the term “explosion” outweigh the drawbacks, if any, arising from undesirable reactions to that term.

(B) The phrase “energetic disassembly” has not so far been used as a substitute for the word “explosion” in the kind of discussion at issue.

(C) In any serious policy discussion, what is said by the participants is more important than how it is put into words.

(D) The only reason that people would have for using “energetic disassembly” in place of “explosion” is to render impossible any serious policy discussion concerning explosions.

(E) The phrase “energetic disassembly” is not necessarily out of place in describing a controlled rather than an accidental explosion.


CONCLUSION: EXPLOSION should be used in discussions of this sort (Serious)
PREMISE 1: Serious policy discussion is served better with Explosion than Energetic Disassembly
PREMISE 2: EXPLOSION also invokes attention

Assumption: Lets say conclusion does not hold
which means "explosion should not be used in discussions"
But why,
What if explosion ,though it brings attention, is still not required in serious policy discussion. In discussions we need positive mindset and seek solutions where energetic disassembly can score. Energetic disassembly brings positive connotation and people become more solution oriented ie. to say it has more advantages than "explosion"
A possible assumption is : Such scenario will not exist. i.e Explosion does not have any drawbacks or positive outweighs its drawbacks...

Hence answer is A

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