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As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays,

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As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays,  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2018, 10:02
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

51% (01:19) correct 49% (00:59) wrong based on 93 sessions

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As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays, notably by Marc Antony in Julius Caesar directly after Caesar's murder, “Havoc!,” a military signal from the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos in order to causing of confusion among the enemy.
A) “Havoc!,” a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos in order to causing of
B) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos, causing
C) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages that directed the soldiers to pillage, invoke chaos, and cause
D) “Havoc!,” a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directed soldiers to pillage, invoke chaos, and cause
E) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages to direct soldiers to pillage and to invoke chaos in order to cause

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Re: As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays,  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2018, 18:59
Confused between A and E
In E it is clear regarding parallelism but bit confused about usage of was here..

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Re: As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays,  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2018, 23:48
In A ,there is a sentence fragment.
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Re: As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays,  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 00:22
As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays, notably by Marc Antony in Julius Caesar directly after Caesar's murder, “Havoc!,” a military signal from the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos in order to causing of confusion among the enemy.
A) “Havoc!,” a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos in order to causing of
1. This is not a sentence.
2. Meaning error- havoc itself doesn't direct the soldiers; it is used by someone as a command.

B) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos, causing
1. Meaning error as stated in A

C) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages that directed the soldiers to pillage, invoke chaos, and cause
1. Meaning change as in A
2. Usage of havoc doesn't cause confusion as depicted by this option. The tactics of soldiers cause the confusion. Thus the usage of and is wrong.

D) “Havoc!,” a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directed soldiers to pillage, invoke chaos, and cause
1. Same errors as in option C

E) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages to direct soldiers to pillage and to invoke chaos in order to cause
CORRECT CHOICE!!
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As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays,  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 00:34
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Sivanalabothula wrote:
Confused between A and E
In E it is clear regarding parallelism but bit confused about usage of was here..

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Sivanalabothula

Option A is a classic example of missing verb trap used by gmat.

If you remove the fluff from the sentence then you will find a trimmed sentence,which looks like this:

As mentioned by ..characters in .. Shakespeare’s plays, “Havoc!,”(Subject) a military signal from the Middle Ages, directing(this one is a verb-ing modifier but not a verb) the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos in order to causing of confusion among the enemy.

You see there is no verb for the subject Havoc. That's why option A is wrong.
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Re: As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays,  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2018, 05:29
mandeey wrote:
As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays, notably by Marc Antony in Julius Caesar directly after Caesar's murder, “Havoc!,” a military signal from the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos in order to causing of confusion among the enemy.
A) “Havoc!,” a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos in order to causing of
B) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directing the soldiers to pillage and invoke chaos, causing
C) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages that directed the soldiers to pillage, invoke chaos, and cause
D) “Havoc!,” a military signal used in the Middle Ages, directed soldiers to pillage, invoke chaos, and cause
E) “Havoc!” was a military signal used in the Middle Ages to direct soldiers to pillage and to invoke chaos in order to cause



Choice E is correct because to pilage and to invoke is parallel.
And cause is result of invoke. So it shouldnt be in parallel to other two entity.
Option E usage this correctly.

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This discussion does not meet community quality standards. It has been retired.


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Re: As mentioned by several characters in William Shakespeare’s plays, &nbs [#permalink] 11 Jan 2018, 05:29
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