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Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity

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Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 14 Dec 2017, 08:50
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A
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Question Stats:

83% (01:03) correct 17% (01:21) wrong based on 221 sessions

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Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity in the orbit of the planet Neptune was adequately explained by the gravitational pull exerted on Neptune by the planet Pluto. The most recent observations of Pluto, however, indicate that this planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did.

If the statements above are true, they provide the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Neptune is somewhat larger than scientists once believed it to be.
(B) The orbit on Neptune is considerably more irregular than scientists once thought it was.
(C) There exists another, as yet undiscovered planet with an orbit beyond that of Pluto.
(D) The gravitational pull of Pluto is not the sole cause of Neptune’s irregular orbit.
(E) Further observations of Pluto will eventually show it to be even smaller than it is now thought to be.

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Originally posted by Akela on 11 Jun 2017, 08:21.
Last edited by broall on 14 Dec 2017, 08:50, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2017, 09:45
I disagree with the OA as Pluto turns out not to be any reason for Neptune's irregular orbit since the argument states "planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did".
And the option d indicates that Pluto's pull is not the sole reason to cause the irregularity, but it is one.
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Re: Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2017, 22:21
Bhuvan.deshwal wrote:
I disagree with the OA as Pluto turns out not to be any reason for Neptune's irregular orbit since the argument states "planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did".
And the option d indicates that Pluto's pull is not the sole reason to cause the irregularity, but it is one.


Let me try for this:
D.The gravitational pull of Pluto is not the sole
cause of Neptune’s irregular orbit.----it means other than pluto there are some forces that are contributing in the irregular orbit.

Argument says that planet(pluto) is much too small to exert the amount of
gravitational pull on Neptune...it does not say that pluto is not causing any gravitational pull..
Gpull = gravitational pull required for irregular orbit ..
Now GPLU = Gravitational pull by pluto ..a
according to argument,
GPULL > GLPU
to make equal ..
GPULL = unknown forces + GPLU .
What D says ..pluto is not the sole reason ........
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Re: Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Apr 2018, 22:44
Akela wrote:
Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity in the orbit of the planet Neptune was adequately explained by the gravitational pull exerted on Neptune by the planet Pluto. The most recent observations of Pluto, however, indicate that this planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did.


If the statements above are true, they provide the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Neptune is somewhat larger than scientists once believed it to be. Not mentioned

(B) The orbit on Neptune is considerably more irregular than scientists once thought it was. Not mentioned

(C) There exists another, as yet undiscovered planet with an orbit beyond that of Pluto. Not mentioned

(D) The gravitational pull of Pluto is not the sole cause of Neptune’s irregular orbit.

(E) Further observations of Pluto will eventually show it to be even smaller than it is now thought to be. Not mentioned


It's (D), alternate cause.
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Re: Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 04:32
Hi GMATNinja, abhimahna

"The most recent observations of Pluto, however, indicate that this planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did" -Doesn't this means, that scientist at later stage realized that Pluto is smaller than it is thought to be?


QZ wrote:
Akela wrote:
Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity in the orbit of the planet Neptune was adequately explained by the gravitational pull exerted on Neptune by the planet Pluto. The most recent observations of Pluto, however, indicate that this planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did.


If the statements above are true, they provide the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Neptune is somewhat larger than scientists once believed it to be. Not mentioned

(B) The orbit on Neptune is considerably more irregular than scientists once thought it was. Not mentioned

(C) There exists another, as yet undiscovered planet with an orbit beyond that of Pluto. Not mentioned

(D) The gravitational pull of Pluto is not the sole cause of Neptune’s irregular orbit.

(E) Further observations of Pluto will eventually show it to be even smaller than it is now thought to be. Not mentioned


It's (D), alternate cause.

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Re: Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 04:39
I got my mistake. Option E says something about future, So it cannot be inferred from the stimulus, hence it is not right.


gmatbusters wrote:
Hi GMATNinja, abhimahna

"The most recent observations of Pluto, however, indicate that this planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did" -Doesn't this means, that scientist at later stage realized that Pluto is smaller than it is thought to be?


QZ wrote:
Akela wrote:
Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity in the orbit of the planet Neptune was adequately explained by the gravitational pull exerted on Neptune by the planet Pluto. The most recent observations of Pluto, however, indicate that this planet is much too small to exert the amount of gravitational pull on Neptune that astronomers once thought it did.


If the statements above are true, they provide the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Neptune is somewhat larger than scientists once believed it to be. Not mentioned

(B) The orbit on Neptune is considerably more irregular than scientists once thought it was. Not mentioned

(C) There exists another, as yet undiscovered planet with an orbit beyond that of Pluto. Not mentioned

(D) The gravitational pull of Pluto is not the sole cause of Neptune’s irregular orbit.

(E) Further observations of Pluto will eventually show it to be even smaller than it is now thought to be. Not mentioned


It's (D), alternate cause.

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Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 04:51
gmatbusters wrote:
I got my mistake. Option E says something about future, So it cannot be inferred from the stimulus, hence it is not right.


Hey gmatbusters ,

Yes that is correct. You cannot infer about the future based on current information. Moreover, option E is stating a similar fact about the size. As an inference of the current argument, we need to show that there size isn't directly/only impacting the orbit. This is what option D is doing. Hence, D is the correct answer.

I hope that helps :-)
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Re: Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 05:27
Hi
I don't think we need to strengthen the argument" in this question.
"If the statements above are true, they provide the most support for which one of the following?"
I believe this is a Must be true / inference question.

PS: I am an amateur in CR, So I might be wrong. Please correct my understanding.

abhimahna wrote:
gmatbusters wrote:
I got my mistake. Option E says something about future, So it cannot be inferred from the stimulus, hence it is not right.


Hey gmatbusters ,

Yes that is correct. You cannot infer about the future based on current information. Moreover, option E is stating a similar fact about the size. In order to strengthen the current argument, we need to show that there size isn't directly/only impacting the orbit. This is what option D is doing. Hence, D is the correct answer.

I hope that helps :-)

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Astronomers have long thought that the irregularity  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 05:32
gmatbusters wrote:
Hi
I don't think we need to strengthen the argument" in this question.
"If the statements above are true, they provide the most support for which one of the following?"
I believe this is a Must be true / inference question.

PS: I am an amateur in CR, So I might be wrong. Please correct my understanding.



Yes, that is correct. This is an inference question and that was a typo. :-P
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