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At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young

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At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2013, 13:13
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At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2013, 10:58
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nave81 wrote:
At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection


Choice D

This question tests the usage of command subjunctive.

Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.



In the question sentence verb demand calls for command subjunctive, So the verb after THAT must be in its bare form (i.e. have). So Choice A and C out.

Choice B does not maintain parallelism. have the right to an education(Noun) and be protected(verb).
Choice E is also wrong for the same reason.

In Choice D, command subjunctive is properly applied and sentence also maintains parallelism. have(bare form) the right to an education(noun) and protection(noun)

Hope that helps! :)
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At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from B  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2015, 12:48
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At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2013, 18:13
Narenn wrote:
nave81 wrote:
At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection


Choice D

This question tests the usage of command subjunctive.

Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.



In the question sentence verb demand calls for command subjunctive, So the verb after THAT must be in its bare form (i.e. have). So Choice A and C out.

Choice B does not maintain parallelism. have the right to an education(Noun) and be protected(verb).
Choice E is also wrong for the same reason.

In Choice D, command subjunctive is properly applied and sentence also maintains parallelism. have(bare form) the right to an education(noun) and protection(noun)

Hope that helps! :)


I am surprised that OA is not A.

Every child ...blah ..blah etc....

"Every" is singular, so the verb is "HAS"

Is the bare form of "HAS" is "HAVE"? Can experts please comment?
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2013, 18:44
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maaadhu wrote:
Narenn wrote:
nave81 wrote:
At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arryoieta, aung girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection


Choice D

This question tests the usage of command subjunctive.

Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.



In the question sentence verb demand calls for command subjunctive, So the verb after THAT must be in its bare form (i.e. have). So Choice A and C out.

Choice B does not maintain parallelism. have the right to an education(Noun) and be protected(verb).
Choice E is also wrong for the same reason.

In Choice D, command subjunctive is properly applied and sentence also maintains parallelism. have(bare form) the right to an education(noun) and protection(noun)

Hope that helps! :)


I am surprised that OA is not A.

Every child ...blah ..blah etc....

"Every" is singular, so the verb is "HAS"

Is the bare form of "HAS" is "HAVE"? Can experts please comment?


Hi Maaadhu,
you are correct about the subject verb agreement . But when a sentence has a command subjective in it [demanded] you need your verb to be in its bare form.
So 'have' would be chosen over 'has'. If the sentence were (......a young girl from Bolivia,said) then the use of 'has' would have been correct)
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2013, 12:33
nave81 wrote:
At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection

This question is particularly easy. The SV agreement issue is interesting --- yes, it is important in general to know that the adjective "every" makes a noun single. For this question, though, it's more important to know that the "demand that" structure requires the subjunctive
X demands that he have ...
X demands that she do ...
X demands that I be ...
X demands that they be ...

That issue is a legitimately interesting split, one very much like what one would see on the GMAT.

The parallelism, though, is too easy. I have never seen parallelism between something as obviously different as a noun & verb, unless they are split up by long complicated intervening clauses. A noun & a verb right next to each other --- no one is going to fall for those two as parallel elements. This is the respect in which this question is not particularly GMAT-like. I would give the question author a grade of about a C+ for the composition of this question, passing, but mediocre, a mixed performance. As a student preparing for the GMAT, you can find much better.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2015, 23:59
Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.


Is the 'require' a Bossy Verb?
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2015, 10:49
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vfqrk23 wrote:
Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.


Is the 'require' a Bossy Verb?

Dear vfqrk23,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, I would be suspicious of the word "always" in the rule you cite. Yes, "that" + [subjunctive] is a common structure for the so-called "bossy" verbs. Sometimes, the same information can be stated with a noun objection.
The company policy demands that I comply with these rules.
The company policy demands my compliance with these rules.
Both of those are fine.

You asked about the verb "require" --- this is a flexible verb can take "that" + [subjunctive] or an infinitive structure.
The company policy requires that he report directly to the CFO. = a bit stilted and awkward
The company requires him to report directly to the CFO. = very natural

My friend, here's a free GMAT idiom ebook:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/
and here is the same information in flashcard form:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/flashcards/idioms

I hope all this helps.
Mike :-)
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At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2015, 13:16
mikemcgarry wrote:
vfqrk23 wrote:
Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.


Is the 'require' a Bossy Verb?

Dear vfqrk23,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, I would be suspicious of the word "always" in the rule you cite. Yes, "that" + [subjunctive] is a common structure for the so-called "bossy" verbs. Sometimes, the same information can be stated with a noun objection.
The company policy demands that I comply with these rules.
The company policy demands my compliance with these rules.
Both of those are fine.

You asked about the verb "require" --- this is a flexible verb can take "that" + [subjunctive] or an infinitive structure.
The company policy requires that he report directly to the CFO. = a bit stilted and awkward
The company requires him to report directly to the CFO. = very natural

My friend, here's a free GMAT idiom ebook:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/
and here is the same information in flashcard form:
https://gmat.magoosh.com/flashcards/idioms

I hope all this helps.
Mike :-)



Dear Mike,

First of all, thank you very much for your clarification, but I would like to say much more thank you for the useful links you have provided.
All of this definitely helps a lot!

Best regards,
vfqrk23
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2015, 15:07
Is right to "an" education correct usage?
Somehow it does not sound right for me
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At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2015, 01:34
Use "a" with words that begin with a consonant. Use "an" with words that do begin with a vowel (A, E, I, O, U).

I bought AN apple.
I bought A banana.

:-D
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2015, 06:56
Derkus wrote:
Use "a" with words that begin with a consonant. Use "an" with words that do begin with a vowel (A, E, I, O, U).

I bought AN apple.
I bought A banana.

:-D


Oh thanks for that!

Likewise-

Right to a speech?

Right to a freedom?

Right to a vote?
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2015, 16:39
anilisanil wrote:
Derkus wrote:
Use "a" with words that begin with a consonant. Use "an" with words that do begin with a vowel (A, E, I, O, U).

I bought AN apple.
I bought A banana.

:-D


Oh thanks for that!

Likewise-

Right to a speech?

Right to a freedom?

Right to a vote?

Dear anilisanil,
I'm happy to respond. :-) Derkus answered the extremely easy question and completely ignored the hard question. The easy question is: if we know we are using the indefinite article, then when do we use "an" and when do we use "a." Derkus spelled out the simple correct answer to this very easy question.

The considerably more difficult question for non-native speakers, and I believe the one you were asking, concerns whether to use an article or not.

For example,
the right to education = correct; this is "education" in the broad sense, education for the whole population
the right to an education = also correct; this would be the education of one individual: my education, your education, etc.

the right to free speech = correct; one of the rights in the US Constitution
the right to speech = idiomatically OK, but logically awkward: what does this mean? Who in the world doesn't have the right to talk at all??
the right to a speech = awkward and unclear; would this mean the right of a person to deliver a speech???

the right to freedom = grammatically correct but logically suspect, almost tautological; we have freedom precisely because we have rights, but the idea of a "right to freedom" doesn't quite make sense. It's not a grammar or idiom problem, but a logical problem.
the right to a freedom = 100% wrong

the right to vote = correct, and this is a different idiom; this is not "right" + "to" + [noun], but "right" + [infinitive]; other examples:
the right to live
the right to write a book
the right to eat whatever I like
the right to study for the GMAT

Those are infinitives. Don't confuse these with the noun idiom discussed above. Thus,
the right to a vote = 100% wrong

These issues are discussed in some of the articles on the Magoosh TOEFL blog:
http://magoosh.com/toefl/
If you sign up for Magoosh TOEFL and Magoosh GMAT, we will give you a discount on the pair.

Please let me know if you have any further questions.
Mike :-)
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2015, 22:34
nave wrote:
At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection


I am a little confused why B also is not correct.

Why is this not parallel--> ......... demanded that every child have the right to an education and be protected....
Here every child have the right to an education, and every child be protected from violence--- why arent they parallel?

In the OA, D, we are extending the phrase 'right to' to both education and protection.
..... have right to education and (right to) protection.. How is that valid? Right to protection (as implied by parallelism in OA) doesnt sound right.

Please clarify, thanks in advance.
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New post 19 Jan 2015, 22:50
hi...

Thanks for Sharing such a valuable post.

I Learn many new things from this discussion :) :)
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2015, 03:29
Narenn wrote:
nave81 wrote:
At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young girl from Bolivia, demanded that every child has the right to an education and protection from violence.

A. has the right to an education and protection
B. have the right to an education and be protected
C. will have the right to an education and protection
D. have the right to an education and protection
E. have the right to be educated and protection


Choice D

This question tests the usage of command subjunctive.

Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.



In the question sentence verb demand calls for command subjunctive, So the verb after THAT must be in its bare form (i.e. have). So Choice A and C out.

Choice B does not maintain parallelism. have the right to an education(Noun) and be protected(verb).
Choice E is also wrong for the same reason.

In Choice D, command subjunctive is properly applied and sentence also maintains parallelism. have(bare form) the right to an education(noun) and protection(noun)

Hope that helps! :)



Hi ,

I understood everything here but not bare form .

Can you explain what is bare form ? and a list of verbs and their forms ??
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2015, 11:07
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adityadon wrote:
Narenn wrote:
Command subjunctive is the mood in which the verb following THAT is always used in its BARE FORM

Structure of the sentence in command sunjunctive :- Bossy Verb + THAT + Subject + Command subjunctive (with BARE form of the verb)

Verbs that always take Command subjunctive(Bossy Verbs) :- demand, dictate, insist, mandate, propose, recommend, request, stipulate, suggest.

Hi ,

I understood everything here but not bare form. Can you explain what is bare form ? and a list of verbs and their forms ??

Dear adityadon,
I'm happy to respond. I will presume to answer for the wise Narenn here.

What Narenn called "bare form" in that comment is known more technically as the infinitive form of a verb. This is the form we get when we remove the "to" from an infinitive; for the vast majority of verbs, the present tense plural is identical to the infinitive form.
infinitive = "to go" ==> infinitive form = "go" ==> present plural = "they go"
infinitive = "to bring" ==> infinitive form = "bring" ==> present plural = "they bring"
infinitive = "to learn" ==> infinitive form = "learn" ==> present plural = "they learn"
The only verb that departs from this pattern is the verb "to be."
infinitive = "to be" ==> infinitive form = "be" ==> present plural = "they are"

The infinitive form of the verb typically gets lots of endings (-s, -ed, -ing) in the various tense of ordinary speech. Ordinary speech is known technically as the indicative mood---ordinary, factual speech. In general, verbs have three moods:
1) indicative mood = factual; +97% of the sentences on the GMAT are in the indicative
2) imperative mood = commands (e.g. "do this!", "walk faster!", "come here!", "learn this!", "Live long and prosper!") The imperative form of a verb is just the infinitive form by itself. None of the sentences in GMAT SC problems will have this form, although this appears in the directions at the beginning of each section (e.g. "If you think the original is best, choose the first answer; otherwise choose one of the others."
3) subjunctive mood = this one is rare, so it's very confusing. In fact, 90% of Americans who are native English speakers have no earthly clue how to use the subjunctive correctly. As with the imperative mood, the subjunctive mood uses the infinitive form, and doesn't make adjustments for singular/plural, as verbs in the indicative do:
The teacher ordered that the student turn in his homework at once.
The drill sergeant commanded that corporal be early to the inspection.

See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... ive-tense/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2015, 04:26
Hi Mike,

I am still a bit confused on why "have" is preferred to "has" when the subject is clearly singular and has in it the bare form

Thanks for your response
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New post 05 May 2015, 04:56
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2015, 09:28
Tmoni26 wrote:
Hi Mike,

I am still a bit confused on why "have" is preferred to "has" when the subject is clearly singular and has in it the bare form

Thanks for your response

Dear Tmoni26,
See the discussion above. You are interpreting "have" as the ordinary plural verb, the plural in what we call the indicative mood, ordinary speech about facts.
he has
they have

That is NOT what is going on in this sentence. In this sentence, the verb following "that" is in the subjunctive mood.
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... ive-tense/
The subjunctive is used inside the "that" clause for "bossy" verb. It is also used for contrary-to-fact hypothetical situations. Bossy verbs:
X commanded that he go.
X commanded that she have Q.
X commanded that it be done.
X commanded that I be prompt.

Contrary to fact or contrary to expectation:
If I were the President of the US, ...
If California were to become its own country, separate from the US, . . .

The subjunctive sounds awkward, and most native English speakers don't use it correctly or at all. Over 95% of the sentences on the GMAT SC in the indicative mood, but a few are in the subjunctive, and you have to understand this to master GMAT SC.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: At a convention held by UNICEF, Gabriella Arrieta, a young   [#permalink] 05 May 2015, 09:28

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