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At the end of the nineteenth century, a rising interest in Native Amer

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New post 27 Feb 2018, 18:54
rajatbanik wrote:
Anyone help me why the answer to the main idea question Q. 5 is C - critique a methodology. I mean here ethnologist want to study the native americans because of two reasons stated and they discussed how the study would help them.

Please explain why C is the best answer


First, what is the meaning of main idea question? it is summary of all paragraphs. What you are concluding is just first para, in rest two para author is criticizing this approach, mentioned in first para. even the third para look like the author's opinion.

Hope My answer is helpful for you.
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New post 26 Apr 2018, 06:23
Hello GMATNinja,
Could you please elaborate on the question and answer of question number 6 of the above passage

"38. It can be inferred from the passage that a characteristic of the ethnological research on Native Americans conducted during the nineteenth century was the use of which of the following?

(A) Investigators familiar with the culture under study
(B) A language other than the informant’s for recording life stories
(C) Life stories as the ethnologist’s primary source of information
(D) Complete transcriptions of informants’ descriptions of tribal beliefs
(E) Stringent guidelines for the preservation of cultural data"

Thank you.
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New post 04 May 2018, 01:45
Please explain why tha answer to the 34th question is C and the answer to question 38 is B ??
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New post 08 May 2018, 19:13
Merged duplicate topics. Please, search question before creating discussion.

ronak25 wrote:
Hello GMATNinja,
Could you please elaborate on the question and answer of question number 6 of the above passage

"38. It can be inferred from the passage that a characteristic of the ethnological research on Native Americans conducted during the nineteenth century was the use of which of the following?

(A) Investigators familiar with the culture under study
(B) A language other than the informant’s for recording life stories
(C) Life stories as the ethnologist’s primary source of information
(D) Complete transcriptions of informants’ descriptions of tribal beliefs
(E) Stringent guidelines for the preservation of cultural data"

Thank you.

ronak25, refer to this post for an explanation of question #6 (38).

siddharthfrancis wrote:
Please explain why tha answer to the 34th question is C and the answer to question 38 is B ??

siddharthfrancis, see if these two posts help with Question 34:


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New post 10 May 2018, 00:16
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
Alexis.vargas10 wrote:
QUESTION 38, PAG 35, VERBAL REVIEW OFFICIAL GUIDE 2ND ED


Please help me with this question.

At the end of the nineteenth century, a rising interest
in Native American customs and an increasing desire to
understand Native American culture prompted ethnologists
to begin recording the life stories of Native American.
Ethnologists had a distinct reason for wanting to
hear the stories: they were after linguistic or anthropological
data that would supplement their own field
observations, and they believed that the personal
stories, even of a single individual, could increase
their understanding of the cultures that they had been
observing from without. In addition many ethnologists
at the turn of the century believed that Native American
manners and customs were rapidly disappearing,
and that it was important to preserve for posterity as
much information as could be adequately recorded
before the cultures disappeared forever.
There were, however, arguments against this method
as a way of acquiring accurate and complete information.

Franz Boas, for example, described autobiographies as being
“of limited value, and useful chiefly for
the study of the perversion of truth by memory,” while
Paul Radin contended that investigators rarely spent
enough time with the tribes they were observing, and
inevitably derived results too tinged by the investi-
gator’s own emotional tone to be reliable.

Even more importantly, as these life stories moved
from the traditional oral mode to recorded written
form, much was inevitably lost. Editors often decided
what elements were significant to the field research on a
given tribe.Native Americans recognized that the
essence of their lives could not be communicated in
English and that events that they thought significant
were often deemed unimportant by their interviewers.

Indeed, the very act of telling their stories could force
Native American narrators to distort their cultures, as
taboos had to be broken to speak the names of dead
relatives crucial to their family stories.
Despite all of this, autobiography remains a useful
tool for ethnological research: such personal reminiscences
and impressions, incomplete as they may be, are
likely to throw more light on the working of the mind
and emotions than any amount of speculation from an
ethnologist or ethnological theorist from another
culture.

38 It can be inferred from the passage that a characteristic of the ethnological research on Native Americans conducted
during the nineteenth century was the use of which of the following?
(A) Investigators familiar with the culture under study
(B) A language other than the informant’s for recording life stories
(C) Life stories as the ethnologist’s primary source of information
(D) Complete transcriptions of informants’ descriptions of tribal beliefs
(E) Stringent guidelines for the preservation of cultural data

I chose A, i do no see why it can be wrong, and I do not finish to understand why B is the answer. I am confused since the passage mentions that during the 19th century there was an interested in linguistics, so I think researches could be interested in the different languages in different cultures, so I do not understand that "A language other than the informant's for recording life stories" is the correct answer.


Focus on the highlighted portions of the text. The text starts out with what ethnologists started doing in 19th century. In arguments against the methods used, it talks about interviewers not spending enough time and hence probably not being properly familiar with the culture. So (A) is not correct. We cannot say that the research used investigators familiar with the culture under study.
Also, English was used to record the life stories of informants (which is different from informant's language) as is evident from the last highlighted portion. So (B) is correct.



Dear VeritasPrepKarishma,

How long should we spend on passages like this (including answering the questions)?
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New post 10 May 2018, 01:35
Mehemmed wrote:
How long should we spend on passages like this (including answering the questions)?



Mehemmed,

Unfortunately, in Verbal you cannot spend more than 1.5 - 2 mins on any question. Also, max time you can save is 30 secs per SC question. Your couple of CR questions sometimes could take as much as 3-4 mins. All in all, you certainly don't have more than 2 mins per question. Given that a passage may have 3-4 questions, you cannot afford to spend more than 6-8 mins on it. Ideally, 3-4 mins to read and understand it and then less than a minute on each question.
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New post 10 May 2018, 01:47
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
Mehemmed wrote:
How long should we spend on passages like this (including answering the questions)?



Mehemmed,

Unfortunately, in Verbal you cannot spend more than 1.5 - 2 mins on any question. Also, max time you can save is 30 secs per SC question. Your couple of CR questions sometimes could take as much as 3-4 mins. All in all, you certainly don't have more than 2 mins per question. Given that a passage may have 3-4 questions, you cannot afford to spend more than 6-8 mins on it. Ideally, 3-4 mins to read and understand it and then less than a minute on each question.



Thank you for the reply. Is this 6-8 mins per passage must be equal for any type of passage. Mostly, long passages (400-450 words) takes me up to 11-13 mins (including answers).
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New post 10 May 2018, 23:24
Mehemmed wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
Mehemmed wrote:
How long should we spend on passages like this (including answering the questions)?



Mehemmed,

Unfortunately, in Verbal you cannot spend more than 1.5 - 2 mins on any question. Also, max time you can save is 30 secs per SC question. Your couple of CR questions sometimes could take as much as 3-4 mins. All in all, you certainly don't have more than 2 mins per question. Given that a passage may have 3-4 questions, you cannot afford to spend more than 6-8 mins on it. Ideally, 3-4 mins to read and understand it and then less than a minute on each question.



Thank you for the reply. Is this 6-8 mins per passage must be equal for any type of passage. Mostly, long passages (400-450 words) takes me up to 11-13 mins (including answers).


Even the long passages won't come with more than 4 questions. So 11-13 mins is not justified. You need to increase your reading speed to about 250 words per minute at least.
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New post 20 May 2018, 22:07
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would be most likely to agree
with which of the following statements about the usefulness of life stories as a
source of ethnographic information?
(A) They can be a source of information about how people in a culture view the world.
(B) They are most useful as a source of linguistic information.
(C) They require editing and interpretation before they can be useful.
(D) They are most useful as a source of information about ancestry.
(E) They provide incidental information rather than significant insights into a way
of life.

Explanation please.
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New post 25 May 2018, 01:17
Took me close to 10 min to read the passage and answer all the questions. Need to work on my improving my time management. :oops:
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New post 29 Jul 2018, 23:16
Hi Verbal Experts,
daagh GMATNinja chetan2u

Please throw light on the "primary purpose" question.

The author at last concludes that autobiographies still remain a useful tool for research. Then how main idea is to "critique a methodology" ?

Is the primary purpose question different from author's viewpoint/purpose?
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New post 30 Jul 2018, 07:11
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The purpose of the author may be different from the primary purpose of the passage. In this case, the author is merely a proponent of the use of autobiographies as a tool of anthropological study, while people like Radin and Boas were the opponents. The issue of the debate was the efficacy of using autobiographies for some purpose.

The purpose of the passage is to review why the autobiographies are useful vs. why they are not. The author is just giving his views from outside the ring as one more participant. Eventually, therefore, the author's purpose need not be the passage's purpose.
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New post 30 Jul 2018, 10:19
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XYZABCABC wrote:
Hi Verbal Experts,
daagh GMATNinja chetan2u

Please throw light on the "primary purpose" question.

The author at last concludes that autobiographies still remain a useful tool for research. Then how main idea is to "critique a methodology" ?

Is the primary purpose question different from author's viewpoint/purpose?


Hello,

I am no expert, but here are my 2 cents.
Firstly, know that 'critiquing' is not same as 'criticizing'
Dictionary meaning: evaluate (a theory or practice) in a detailed and analytical way i.e. to present the merits and demerits of the theory.

So, here the author introduces the practice in the beginning of the passage - using autobiographies to know more about life stories of N.A people.
Then the author presents the disadvantages followed by his opinion (advantage) of the practice.
Essentially, the author is indeed evaluating or 'critiquing' a methodology.
Hope that answers your question.
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